Some plants from the Gibson Desert Nature Reserve

Hi,
I'm not much of a botanist, however here are some plants from the Gibson Desert Nature Reserve recently.




Number 7 was pretty interesting, such a huge specimen. Number 9 had ants crawling all over it as if it was a food source.

Cheers
Alan

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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 21:43

Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 21:43
Hi Al

Great show, do you want me to name some of them for you?



Cheers



Stephen
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Follow Up By: equinox - Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 21:45

Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 21:45
Yes please Stephen, give it your best shot :-)

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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 22:12

Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 22:12
Here we go Al, easy ones first....

Spider..

Nephilidae...Golden orb web spider.

No 3 looks very much like Calandrinia...Parakeelya.

No 4 Senna species, in the Cassia family.

No 5 Ptilotus obovatus, Silver Tails

No 9 Acacia species, Mulga??

No 10 looks like in the Senna family



Let's hope Val sets the records straight.


Cheers


Stephen





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Follow Up By: equinox - Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 22:30

Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 22:30
Hi Stephen, that's great.
Not sure about 3 being Parakeelya, unless that's a juvenile - I thought they had yellow flowers.
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Alan

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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 23:28

Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 23:28
Hi Alan

Parakeelya have that pretty purle flower as you have it pictured. When we were out on our recent trip, it was everywhere and it is a very suculent plant and holds lots of moisture. It will start off a very small plant and gets a lot larger with age.

I have seen some young plants with quite small flowers, a little larger than say a 5 cent piece and only about 50mm high, with larger plants the flower the size of around the 20 cent size and around 150 mm high.

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Reply By: Member - John and Val - Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 22:30

Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 22:30
Hi Alan,

1. Calytrix sp
2 same as 6?
3 Calandrinia sp - Parakeelya
4. Petalostylis sp
5. Ptilotus obovata
6. Dicrastylis exsuccosa - Golden sand sage
7 John Baas might know this one?
8 spider
9 Hakea sp
10. Senna sp - Cassia

So now it would be very easy to put them into the wildflowers section, especially as some are already posted there, just waiting for extra photos. You could put #7 in and call it unknown.

Cheers,

Val.
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Follow Up By: equinox - Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 22:56

Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 22:56
Hi Val, thank you for that, I will put them in tomorrow.

Re number 2 & 6 here are two additional pics:



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Alan

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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Sunday, Sep 28, 2014 at 07:32

Sunday, Sep 28, 2014 at 07:32
Alan, they are all Golden sand sage. Your close-up photo is a good one. I found it hard to get a good photo of it - so many fuzzy hairs that the camera didnt know where to focus.

Thanks in advance for posting in the wildflowers section. Just fill in as much info as you can and I will fill in the gaps. Use the latin name or "unknown" if you dont know a common name as that is a mandatory field.

Cheers,

Val.
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Follow Up By: luxtourer - Sunday, Sep 28, 2014 at 22:01

Sunday, Sep 28, 2014 at 22:01
I believe 10 is also called Cockroach Bush (senna notabilis)? We saw stacks around Marble Bar last year.

Thanks for the pics Alan

Cheers, John
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Reply By: Joe Fury - Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 22:50

Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 22:50
G'day Alan

The plant shown in your #7 frame is the Caustic Vine, this plant has a white sap that is toxic, don't handle food without washing your hands if you handle this plant, it can make you quite crook.

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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Sunday, Sep 28, 2014 at 07:38

Sunday, Sep 28, 2014 at 07:38
Thanks Jo, I wondered about that, but the only plant I have seen was much smaller so I wasn't sure.
So here is another name for Alan - Sarcostemma viminale.

Cheers,

Val.
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Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, Sep 28, 2014 at 11:17

Sunday, Sep 28, 2014 at 11:17
Wow, thanks Joe (and Val) - glad I know that now. This one attracted my attention, after that I did see a few smaller versions of it around.

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Alan

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Follow Up By: Rick (S.A.) - Wednesday, Oct 01, 2014 at 12:41

Wednesday, Oct 01, 2014 at 12:41
When a stem is broken, a white sap immediately issues. I have found it to be a really handy 'wound healer'.

If you have a cut or graze on your hand, put the white sap on it & it will be resolved more quickly than without the sap.

Sometimes found trailing up a mulga, it is also a resident of stony areas, usually observed as a single, isolated plant. From personal observation, it is an extremely widespread species

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Follow Up By: equinox - Thursday, Oct 02, 2014 at 20:49

Thursday, Oct 02, 2014 at 20:49
Thanks Rick,
That is interesting.
I know what bush to look for next time I get a wound :-)

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Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Sunday, Sep 28, 2014 at 00:01

Sunday, Sep 28, 2014 at 00:01
Good post Alan - surprising so much in flower out there.


Thanks everyone for naming the plants - most interesting - always something new to learn.

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