Whose fault for a dodgy bike rack?

Submitted: Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 09:26
ThreadID: 109796 Views:2184 Replies:8 FollowUps:9
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12 months ago I ordered a windsor rapid expander caravan with the option of a bike rack fitted. I have had my sons bike on the back for the last 12 months. On the weekend I took it to the caravan place to have a few unrelated repairs done and they noticed a big hole in the roof cause by the handlebar of the bike rubbing against the exterior of the caravan. The bike in question is a 20" kids bmx. Not a specialised bike by any means.

My question is who is responsible? I'm claiming dodgy bike rack, their claiming long handlebars on the bike.......
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Reply By: Freshstart - Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 09:38

Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 09:38
Sorry mate but I believe it's your problem. I think that you should have checked that nothing would be rubbing on anything. Sorry.

If I put a bit of wood on the roof rack and a bit was sticking through the mesh and scratched the roof, then it would be my stuff up.
AnswerID: 540273

Reply By: Been-Everywhereman - Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 09:45

Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 09:45
Yep same as Freshstart.
It would be a universal bike rack and standard procedure before setting off is to check things are secure and looking good.
AnswerID: 540275

Reply By: Athol W1 - Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 09:54

Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 09:54
LeeJ
Sorry mate but IMHO unless there is a mechanical or structural failure in the bike rack I believe that it is a user beware issue, as the manufacturer has no control over the manner in which the rack is used.
AnswerID: 540276

Reply By: Member - mechpete - Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 09:56

Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 09:56
LeeJ
why do some people always try to find someone else to blame
you mucked up you wear it
mechpete
AnswerID: 540277

Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 12:28

Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 12:28
Yep agree

I fitted a garage door to a clients home about 12 months ago and she called me last week to say she had lost her car keys and that the garage remote was on the keyring so cannot get into her garage either now.

I arranged for a serviceman to come out and recode and supply a replacement handset to the door. Her response was "who is going to pay for that?"
Some people..........
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Follow Up By: LeeJ - Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 at 07:21

Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 at 07:21
Maybe because determining who is responsible is an important part of the process.

Also just to clarify- I did not fit the bike rack, it was recomended and fitted by the dealer. I also did not unjustly use the bike rack. I used it in due faith and as it was meant to be used.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 at 07:44

Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 at 07:44
Lee it is the manufacters responsibility to fit the rack and ensure it does not fall apart which I understand is the case
The problem is to do with whoever fitted the bike to the rack did not exercise caution to ensure it was not going to move around or damage the bike or the van / vehicle
If you paid them to also mount the bike onto the rack then you probably have a case if not blame the bike fitter
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FollowupID: 826134

Follow Up By: Les PK Ranger - Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 at 08:38

Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 at 08:38
Alby posted: 'I arranged for a serviceman to come out and recode and supply a replacement handset to the door. Her response was "who is going to pay for that?"
Some people..........'

Before sending a person out to carry out such a service, I would make it VERY clear beforehand who was going to pay for it, and payable on completion.
Makes debt collection a whole lot easier to establish these things, as like you say people are unbelievable sometimes as to their way of thinking.

Lee . . . yes, I see where you are coming from, but bikes are so varied, with a car the handle bars are normally higher than a regular car boot for example, but on the back of a van they could cause issues.
Usually a bikes front wheel / handle bars should be tied off to not move.
If handle bars are at risk of contact, the wheel probably needs removing and handlebars occy strapped off so they are parallel to the van rear.

Anyway, lesson learned now I guess.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 at 09:49

Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 at 09:49
Agree Les, this conversation was prior to the service call and it was made clear to pay them on completion. I was just taken back at her mindset that she was not taking responsibility for her own actions, something that is becoming more commonplace in our society
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 at 13:12

Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 at 13:12
QUOTE "Maybe because determining who is responsible is an important part of the process."

There is no determining who was at fault, by you fitting a bike and not paying attention was who caused the damage.



QUOTE "why do some people always try to find someone else to blame
you mucked up you wear it"

Because some can not accept they made a mistake and it is going to cost them money to repair.

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FollowupID: 826149

Reply By: LeeJ - Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 11:11

Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 11:11
Thanks everyone. I thought as much but some family members suggested that it was the fault of the manufacturer so I thought I'd better ask.

Not looking forward to the cost of repair- tops off 2014 really. What a sucky year.

Oh well, thems the breaks hey.
AnswerID: 540280

Follow Up By: Bigfish - Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 18:59

Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 18:59
Just a suggestion mate...Would it be cheaper to have a thick piece of aluminium pop rivetted/and silastic over hole and this will also stop future issues with bars?
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 at 07:36

Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 at 07:36
Good suggestion Bigfish
Places like Supacheap also sell thin alloy chequeplate panels that is self adhesive that the doofdoof boys use as decorative trim that may work as well
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FollowupID: 826133

Reply By: get outmore - Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 11:15

Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 11:15
thier fault if you put the bike in saw it rub and took it back
not thier fault you actually used it
AnswerID: 540282

Reply By: brushmarx - Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 12:08

Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 12:08
Personally, I think you should use a time machine, go back a century or so and bitch slap the designer of the bicycle who thought a handlebar was the way to go.
If he used a Playstation joystick style of steering mechanism all would be fine, no rubmarks on your caravan.
Othewise, I'm with the rest of the fine people here. First fitting of the bike probably would have shown a possible problem, then either a modification to the rack, or different bike positions could be looked at.
Cheers
I'll get there someday, or die wanting to.

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AnswerID: 540285

Reply By: bazz - Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 18:39

Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 18:39
well my rack failed and dragged 2 bikes , the stem snapped , it was mounted on rear , took photos , do I have a claim , if so what steps to take ...?
AnswerID: 540297

Follow Up By: TomH - Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 20:17

Monday, Oct 13, 2014 at 20:17
NO

Not enough info How old is it, Is it a 2 bike rack, was it attached correctly. Lots to consider.

Incidentally these things have a habit of wearing out and the forces transmitted by the weight on them often exceeds the design limits.

Eg people mount genny carriers on rear bumpers of vans and when it hits a decent bump up to 7 times the static weight can be on the carrier. Result genny gets a sudden solo trip.
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FollowupID: 826114

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