Latest Fraser Island Dingo Attack

Submitted: Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 12:26
ThreadID: 109931 Views:2055 Replies:9 FollowUps:15
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Maybe not a good idea to go jogging on Fraser Island?
See here.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Manfred b - Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 19:01

Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 19:01
Worked with dogs for a living all my life, take a tip: if you are running and spot a dog - stop running and face it. Dogs hunt by running prey down, guess what you look like when you are running?
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Follow Up By: gbc - Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 19:57

Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 19:57
Precisely right and all the dingo guff on the npws paperwork supports it. We taught the kids to stand tall with hands in the air facing the animal if confronted. Luckily they have not been confronted.
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Follow Up By: Sandman - Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 20:08

Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 20:08
We had the same advice out at Giles Weather station last week. Take a stick as the dogs hunt in packs. Face them and dont run....

Pete
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 20:54

Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 20:54
even with only 2dogs this can be hard. face one and the other flanks and goes behind.. turn to try and head it off and keep it in front of you and immediately other dog moves in on you
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Follow Up By: rumpig - Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 21:10

Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 21:10
news footage tonight showed one of the ladies who was attacked being interviewed...she mentioned they both stood back to back (so facing the dingos) whilst the dogs circled them and one attacked their legs.
Not the usual Fraser Island type of attack that involves unsupervised kids or drunk backpackers alone on the island that's for sure.
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Follow Up By: Sandman - Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 21:18

Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 21:18
Kick the living $hit out of them, they will get the message....Its not like a Hollywood movie, keep your wits about you and if they do come for you be prepared to sink the boot in big time.....
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 21:43

Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 21:43
Unless you were wearing steel cap boots, Sandman, all that would happen would be that they'd bite your feet, as well as your legs. And no doubt these girls were only wearing joggers?

Got bitten on the foot, enclosed in a leather riding boot, by a dingo years ago, and it was like having said foot crushed in a 50 tonne press, with teeth. :-)

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: gbc - Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 09:42

Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 09:42
I'd rate 2 dingos against pretty much any grown human. The ladies did the right thing once they realised their predicament, but it is whelping season and they were running - the switch was already flicked.
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Reply By: Bazooka - Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 21:36

Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 21:36
Is it the feeding or lack of prey causing this odd behaviour Allan? Might have to stop giving handouts to the maggies and currawongs if it's the former. They seem to be particularly friendly but might be lulling me into a false sense of security. Hitcock all over again.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 21:50

Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 21:50
Dunno Bazooka. I don't consider myself an expert in this area. But being a regular visitor to Fraser since 1985 I have often observed the dingos. They certainly have become more audacious over time and I would not trust one. The mere numbers of visiting people, together with some people feeding them probably has emboldened them. We had our campsite raided by a dingo one night recently.

Magpies? Not an expert there either. LOL
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 22:32

Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 22:32
Bloody native animals have no respect these days. We had possums trying to get through a nylon tent once. All we had was plain bread - in its plastic wrap, inside a pack, inside the tent. The buggers could still smell it and were determined to have a midnight snack. We fought off that attack but they got their man later during our bushwalk in Tassie. He/she found its way into our hut, opened a pack lid and helped him/herself to the last of our dried fruit. We thought it was cute so enjoyed the show with our torches before sending it back into the night. Very determined lot down there and they obviously know where the human lollie shops are.
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Follow Up By: Sandman - Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 22:48

Sunday, Oct 26, 2014 at 22:48
If I had no choice but to retaliate, make sure its a good one and any enclosed shoe will cause hurt to the ribs of a dog.....

I've watched packs of dingoes out here in Alice Springs, i watch them and they watch me as I walk. If they bring the fight to me then there probably isnt much i can do except retaliate. Certainly I'd prefer to be left alone and I certainly dont go out to seek trouble but if you dont have much choice........
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 08:40

Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 08:40
According to the chief ranger on Fraser the problem is the dingoes becoming accustomed to humans, losing their fear of us, because humans have been approaching them and sometimes feeding them over the years.

The mother or pack will pass that lack of fear onto new pups.

The reason for the growth of fences is not to keep dingoes out but to keep the humans in and away from the dogs.
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Reply By: toffytrailertrash - Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 08:52

Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 08:52
They NPW should never had taken the brumbies off the island, it was their food source...put them back on.
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Follow Up By: Chris_K - Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 15:03

Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 15:03
Sure - and Cane Toads were the answer to the Cane Beetle right? Brumbies just decimated the vegetation on Fraser...people are the problem here - not the Dingo's. Visitors (the stupid ones) feed them, get up close and personal to take photo's, and then they lose their fear of humans.
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Reply By: Hairy (NT) - Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 12:30

Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 12:30
Gday,

I wonder If you can sue the owners for lack of dog control?
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Reply By: toffytrailertrash - Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 15:12

Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 15:12
There are only two alternatives to the control of the dingoes on Fraser and one is to supply them with food as there is now no natural, whether feral or otherwise available to them and we all now what the second alternative is..... It is only a matter of time before a person/child is taken.

Cheers
AnswerID: 540911

Reply By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 16:05

Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 16:05
I also have been going there for a while and never had a lot of problems with dogs. From time to time I have seen them nip people (many years ago) but never attack. What's also interesting is that they have been culled quite ruthlessly I believe and their numbers are much smaller now (paper this morning quotes 50 to 200 for the Island) so it really doesn't make a lot of sense. There is a fair bit of food on the island but their scavenging around various camps and towns has been seriously curtailed.

I was there a month ago and it really was spot the dingo as they are few and far between. Even at camp where the fishing and cooking aromas should have brought them around it was several days before we had an encounter. It was late at night and someone got a fright seeing one near the camp (what a girl) and we moved it along.

Sounds a bit like crying wolf or is that dingo but their behaviour has changed over the last few years and it seems that they are getting desperate. So when we had heaps of dingos the problem was less evident the it is now and with government intervention after a series of attacks and at least one death we seem to have a more serious problem. One can only wonder about the management.

Kind regards
AnswerID: 540912

Reply By: Bazooka - Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 16:13

Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 16:13
My curiousity was, as usual, aroused by various comments so I went looking and found THIS-Fraser Dingoes Myths and Realities (FAQs) which answers my questions.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 16:58

Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 16:58
surprised at how much fish they eat and how little feral cat, assume there is not a cat problem on the island like we have on the mainland?
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Follow Up By: rumpig - Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 18:39

Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 18:39
Especially during tailor season, drive the beach at night time and you'll see plenty of places the dingos have dug up the fish frames buried deep in the sand by the fisherman, you'll also spot a fair few dingos about also
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Reply By: Ron N - Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 18:34

Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 18:34
A water pistol filled with a strong ammonia-based cleaning solution and squirted at aggressive dogs is a pretty good way of getting them to back off.
Hit in the mouth and eyes it stings and burns, and makes them think twice about continuing with an attack.
AnswerID: 540921

Follow Up By: rooster350 - Tuesday, Oct 28, 2014 at 11:06

Tuesday, Oct 28, 2014 at 11:06
Yep, and we all carry one of those around with us for just that situation...really is a good idea but hardly practical for a tourist on the odd , odd chance of meeting up with a hungry dingo intent on having them for lunch.
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Reply By: Robyn R4 - Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 21:46

Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 21:46
My dad grew up on Fraser during the 1940s. As much as I love and am fascinated by the place I have seen an enormous change in the dingoes between 1985 (my first visit) and 2000 (my last).
Of course we know there are so many more 4WDs on the road these days (and not all are owned by responsible people)
In my opinion there are now too many visitors to the island and with that, comes problems for the dingoes. You see idiots feeding them to lure them in for photos etc but when something goes wrong, the poor dingo cops it. Gotta have that damn Facebook photo, eh?!
I am very much saddened by the decline of the dingoes' ways. In 1985, they were skitty and kept their distance. 15 years later, we were being warned what to do if confronted.
You can educate people all you like about respecting the poor dingo, but I think the damage has been done- there will always be the idiots who disregard rules and subsequent tourists then run the risk of facing a dingo that's been taught the wrong thing.
And yes, the brumbies were part of the ecology in the 80s when all went a bit more smoothly...
I love Fraser because of my family connection but have vowed to love it from a distance now and be one less vehicle there.
I respect people who visit and I fully understand the lure...but it's not for me any more.

AnswerID: 541093

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