Tyre gauges

Submitted: Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 12:16
ThreadID: 109977 Views:2909 Replies:13 FollowUps:20
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I have just read with great interest the recent post here on tyre pressures,along the way in this post tyre gauges got a mention, with relation to quality and accuracy of same.
This has put the question in my mind as to what is available out there in regard to a good quality, accurate tyre gauge that one can "put some faith in"?
It would be good to have a gauge that you could be reasonably confidant in
I look forward to your guidence, Cheers. Steve.
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Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 12:22

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 12:22
Poly air make a brilliant gauge that measures right down to a few psi - they aren't cheap but neither are tyres.

I think I paid about $40 but that was years ago.

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AnswerID: 541029

Reply By: BunderDog - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 12:48

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 12:48
Any number are available on EBay for under $10 including postage.
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Reply By: rocco2010 - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 13:26

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 13:26
Gidday

Short of buying an expensive scientific instrument (if it exists) I don't know.

I bought what I believe to be likely to be a reliable instrument , from a reputable supplier and not bargain basement off ebay and checked it against the gauge at the local servo.

They produced close to the same reading, plus or minus a pound or two, and so has the gauge at another local servo at other times.

So I am confident that my gauge is pretty accurate and my usual practice is to check the tyres at the servo and then check again at home. If I am travelling and get air at a country servo I usually check with my own gauge.

I think it would be coincidence if several different gauges were all wrong by the same amount and seeing we are not talking about Formual One here I figure a pound or two either way is not that critical.

But I daresay they will be plenty of people to tell me I am wrong.

Cheers
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 13:58

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 13:58
There are good gauges to be had, but it is difficult to evaluate them.

Gauges come in three types, 1) Pencil gauges, 2) Digital gauges, and 3) Dial gauges.

1) Pencil gauges. These were the standard for many years, but by their very design were rarely accurate. Robust but not easy to read.

2) Digital gauges. Maybe a good idea but in my experience not as reliable as may be expected. Their accuracy can be affected by temperature changes and the battery can be flat just when you need it.

3) Dial gauges. My preference. Generally easy to read and can be reasonably accurate. Many brands and types available so difficult to choose a good one. Choice reviewed some in 2011 and gave a tick to 'Dr Air' and 'Slime' brands.
'Slime' (Yes, a dreadful name) has been around for yonks with a good reputation and is the gauge I use. It has been checked against an industrial calibration gauge and is within 1psi over the range from 20 to 60psi. This gauge retains the reading on removal from the tyre for convenient reading and has a pushbutton to release the reading. The pushbutton also acts as a deflator whilst attached to the tyre.

It does take a little trouble to manufacture a quality gauge so expect to pay at least $20.

My observation of gauges at service stations is that few are within reasonable calibration.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: rocco2010 - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 14:08

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 14:08
Allan

Back you on the digital gauges.

I bought one because the shape and size suited my motorcycle wheels (the person who designed them never had to fiddle around to check tyre pressures) and the only thing consistent about the readings was their inconsistency. And it wasn't a cheapie either.

Cheers



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Reply By: swampfox - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 14:46

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 14:46
hi
Either go to your local hydraulic or any industrial hose shop .
Select a 2.5inch 0-15 psi low pressure use 1/2 pound increments
or larger 3-4 inch to suit your eye sight 0-75psi On road
liquid filled
t piece
tap -to release pressure
hose and clamps
tyre valve chuck, clip on style
2.5 inch version $40-50
As u would expect the larger the guage the more $

I have used a 0-15 running around 3 psi in my buggy Very Realiable/accurate

swampfox
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Follow Up By: swampfox - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 14:49

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 14:49
2.5 , 3, 4 inch diameter guage

swampfox
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Reply By: Member - tommo05 - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 17:11

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 17:11
On a related note if you're carrying a compressor, which I daresay you would be if you are playing with pressures, what's wrong with the gauge on the compressor?

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 17:41

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 17:41
The gauge on the compressor does not read the true tyre pressure.
It reads the pressure at the compressor, which will be several psi above that in the tyre.
If the compressor is switched off whilst remaining connected to the tyre, then it will read the tyre pressure.

Apart from the above, gauges fitted to compressors are rarely accurate.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: olcoolone - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 18:06

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 18:06
Don't get over stressed with tyre gauges being inaccurate..... tyre pressure in general is not that accurate.

Most cheap tyre gauges will be up to 4-5 psi out and being 4-5 psi out on tyre pressures according to the placard is not going to cause any damage or be dangerous.

Remember tyre pressure is a more rule of thumb calculation then science.

As long as they are not too under inflated flat or too over inflated your safe, the biggest thing is the ensure the tyre pressures are the same left to right on the same axle.... unless you have tandem axles.

If one wants to get pedantic a tyre gauge to be 100% accurate has to be used in a controlled temperature...so even the best will be out for everyday use.
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 19:15

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 19:15
Um sorry mate but that is simply not true.

a couple of PSI either way on a 120psi truck tyre is not an issue, but some vehicles can be very fussy about tyre pressure and 6psi is a very big incriment in a tyre that may have 30 psi in it...thats 20%..a considerable engineering margin.

I've always been pretty fussy about tyre pressure and several of the vehicles I have owned definitely change their behaviours with 5psi changes in tyre pressures.

On light vehicles running relativly low pressures a few psi either way can make a difference to how the tyres wear and the vehicle handles.

have a look at load V pressure tables and the the incriments can be as low as 25kpa or about 3.6psi..in the Australin standard..though many of the tables are 50kpa or 7psi incriments.

as for being 100% accurate...nothing is 100% accurate, but some of the better tyre guages are good for pluss or minus 1psi and you don't have to spend hundreds to get one.....and any decent guage will have some sort of temperature compensation mechanism buit in.

cheers
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 21:05

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 21:05
Sorry Bantam if every one who had brand X tyres ran 33psi and every one with brand Y ran 36psi and so on it would be true.

Or every one who had brand X tyres fitted to brand J vehicles......

People run all differant pressures with little impact.

If you did a survey on this forum I am pretty confident tyre pressures would be all over rhe place.

Some are just to anal when it comes to some things.

Thete is not one pressure suits all for the application anf personel preferance.

So maybe you should have good hard think if you think every one is uniform........arrh the idea perfect world comes to mind again.

Yes agree a few psi can make a big differance but we are talking road going vehicles and not race cars with race car drivers trying the shave 1/10's of a second a lap off.

I supose I can be gratefull I'm not hell bent on increasing the efficency of stuff by 0.000068% as some are, close enough is good enough as I have better things to do with my time then worrying about tyre pressures, antenna dBi and everything else some 4x4ers worry about.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 21:23

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 21:23
The actual reading of the Guage is not so important , it is more a reference point to work off when you raise or lower pressures looking for the sweet spot

There is a utube video from Dr Air I think it was from memory discussing gauges and their accuracy and they are saying that a gauge reads most accurately in the middle third of the dial so for most users a gauge of 0-60 psi like ARB etc sell is the most suitable. That style of guage operate on a bladder system not a clock spring type mechanism so are less susceptible to loss of accuracy due to abuse
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 21:44

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 21:44
Yes Alby....... Agree 100% it's a referance to work with.



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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 22:28

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 22:28
quote
Sorry Bantam if every one who had brand X tyres ran 33psi and every one with brand Y ran 36psi and so on it would be true.

Or every one who had brand X tyres fitted to brand J vehicles......

People run all differant pressures with little impact.



Lets not confuse variance from one situation to another with the need or benifit of accuracy in individual situations.

we have enough problem getting it thru peoples thick skulls that every vehicle is different and requires the tyre pressures to be chosen bassed on the tyres selected and the load they are carrying.

That whole bag of worms does not justify one jot the view that accuracy is not required or benificial.

And we are not talking about race cars......My old L300 van was one of those vehicles that responded well to accurate controll of tyre pressures....I have driven and workd in companies that run fleets of vans most of my working life.....both L300s and Hiaces can drive very poorly with out due diligence to the tyre pressures.....though some simply don't notice or have never driven a van that actually behaves and is pleasant to drive.

hiaces like to run a bit harder..L300s respond very pooly to over inflation and being 5 psi over or under in the front tyres can make them quite unpleasant to drive, particularly when the front end has some age under it.
An L300 with a front end in good condition a litlle weight in the rear and the tyres correctly inflated can be very pleasant to drive and handle very well.

I know plenty of times I have got into a van another bloke has been in....and its driving like a dog....get the tyre pressures right and things get a hell of a lot better..

cheers
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Follow Up By: Member Kerry W (WA) - Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 02:38

Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 02:38
Yes Olcoolone, very true.

It is surprising how much lower one front tyre has to be on some 4x4s before you notice much difference in handling - even when cornering.

No matter how diligent you are.
Kerry W (Qld)
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 08:31

Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 08:31
Bantam..... seriously and with all due respect to you: people who own tyres do not sit down and calculate or research what is the best pressure to the nearest single digit PSI, if you run 32-46 for most tyres on most vehicles your going to be in the ballpark.

If one is so pedantic with single increment adjustments they really need to take up another hobby.

Yes it is good to maintain pressures to a safe acceptable level...... so what is a safe and acceptable level?

If 4x4er's were concerned and also looked after their health the way they are concerned and looked after their 4x4 we would be a nation of super fit and health humans.......LOL

So do you adjust pressures on hot days....cold days.... if driving on windy roads through the hills...... on a freeway doing short trips..... on a freeway doing long trips.... if your loaded with 3ookg of gear..... if your loaded with 400kg of gear.... if your loaded with 200kg of gear....... How much water is in the air you pumped your tyres up with?

All these things listed above affect tyre pressure considerably.





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Follow Up By: Member Kerry W (WA) - Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 09:50

Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 09:50
Phew! - sounds stressful. I usually go bush to get away from all this head stuff.

and believe it or not - things rarely go askew
Kerry W (Qld)
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 11:53

Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 11:53
Serioulsy and with all due respect .....those who are wise and prudent do reasearch and calculate the appropriate tyre pressures for their vehicle.

A follow up further down proves that positivly.

Also when you hear people talking about "airing down"....well those who know their business any way...they speak in specific terms about the tyre pressures....when some one who has done their reserach, calculation and testing for their vehicle and they say 18psi...that is what they mean and not 16 or 20...and that is what they will be looking for on their guage.

When it gets that low in pressure a few psi this way or that can mean a great deal.

Those who know their business and know their vehicle and the tyres on it will know there is a great deal of difference between 18psi and 24psi...but its only 6psi...likewise they will know there is a great deal of difference between 18psi and 12psi..though it is only 6psi.
They will also understand the risks and limitations these pressure changes pose.

When we get down to 12psi....a 3psi error is 25%......that is a significant error in any engineering terms.

we keep hearing people talking about wild generalisations when it comes to tyres.

quote
if you run 32-46 for most tyres on most vehicles your going to be in the ballpark.

this would have to be one of the wildest generalisations I have ever heard......one worth of a high school drop out tyre fitter.

If you ran 46psi in the rear tyres of a factory shod 75 series fully loaded you would be 20psi under the required pressure, guaranteed of uneven tyre wear and definitely in risk of premature tyre failure.

If you ran 32psi in the front of many light 4wds they would ride like a dray and you may find some serious traction problems.

quote
So do you adjust pressures on hot days....cold days.... if driving on windy roads through the hills...... on a freeway doing short trips..... on a freeway doing long trips.... if your loaded with 3ookg of gear..... if your loaded with 400kg of gear.... if your loaded with 200kg of gear....... How much water is in the air you pumped your tyres up with?

As usual you are throwing the baby out with the bath water and mixing minor issues with significant issues like thay had equal importance....they aren't.

do I adjust pressures on hot and cold days......no that is rediculous and shows ignorance of the whole concept of cold inflation pressure the inherant engineering latitude and the self regulating nature of tyre pressures.

do I change pressures depening on how I am using the vehicle?.....not to the rediculous extent you imply...but I do run a few psi harder on long highway trips....as do many....and I can tell the difference.

Do I change my tyre pressures depending on how the vehcle is loaded.....damn straight.....when the owners manual specifies and the load v pressure tables agree that there is a required difference in my rear tyres of nearly 100% ( the fully laden pressure is nearly twice the unladen pressure) from unladen to fully laden...of course I do


As far as moisture in the air in tyres.......OH here we go....yes it does effect how the heat changes pressure......but nowhere near to the extent you imply.....and for most people managing this issue is simply not practical...where tyre pressure is simple and easy to manage.

That said my workshop air is pretty dry compared to most.... have made it that way for a number of reasons......I have also worked for people who drain there compressor and let it cool, before filling tyres.

If ya realy want to throw about something that is beaten up and makes no appreciable difference away from the race track you could talk about filling tyres with nitrogen.


regardless of if you can be bothered or can tell the difference, running the correct tyre pressures for the situation and within a few psi can make very big differences to many things.
handling
traction
ride
tyre wear
fuel economy

and this is well proven and documented...to argue otherwise is simly rediculous.

If more 4wders and and caravan tourers understood tyre pressures properly and took the time and effort to run the correct tyre pressures for the job...there would be a great deal less tyre failures and a great deal less threads on forums asking why their tyres have failed or worn badly.

cheers
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 12:10

Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 12:10
quote
It is surprising how much lower one front tyre has to be on some 4x4s before you notice much difference in handling - even when cornering.

No matter how diligent you are.

different vehicles behave differently......if you have a heavy 4wd with a live front end, particularly if it has big tyres you may have bugger all steering feel at the best of times.......ya drive these things by looking out the front window, because you get next to no usefull information thru the wheel or the seat of ya pants.

IFS 4wds drive a feel more like cars, and have far better steering feel.

that does not make correct tyre inflation any less important.

underinflated tyres will wear poorly and if grossly underinflated will fail prematurely regardless of how the steering feels.

cheers
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Friday, Oct 31, 2014 at 08:39

Friday, Oct 31, 2014 at 08:39
Well what is the correct tyre pressure?

What the tyre placard says...... what the tyre manufacture says..... what the world wide web says...... or is it what one thinks it should be.

There is such a big difference people run tyre pressures at it shows there can be a big tolerance.

Maybe you should start a thread on the subject...... it might be scarry how many don't run the correct pressures.

I am not disagreeing with you on the aspect of under or over inflated tyres.... what I am saying is the gap between the two is greater then one may think.

You can have 2 people with identical 4x4's and identical tyres doing much the same type of driving...... one person may inflate their tyres to 34psi and the other to 42psi.... both have never had a tyre fail of wear badly.

We run our Coopers at 45psi front and 48psi rear and have done so for 10's of thousands of kilometers over all terrain with no problems...... others on some other forums run 35psi front and 35psi rear with no problems.



In my previous post I just threw up questions people ask and what are the different theory out their in the real world, I know what the outcome is.

What your personal preferences are and how fussy you may be in the real world people are not all like you when it comes to tyre pressures.

Getting back to the original post..... a tyre gauge out by 2-5psi is not going to make an ounce of difference and the variance people run everyday is greater then that.

Classic example a quality tyre chain inflate or service vehicle tyres to 45psi, we run them at 68psi and have done for years on many of our service vehicles...... no problems and no issues....... they clock up about 50-70,000k a year.

Do you think every mechanic sits down a checks what the tyre pressure should be for the weight, type of vehicle and ask the owner what they drive like and were before checking their tyre pressures......arhhh NO! and should they be...NO!

Tyre pressures are not an exact science and can be run with a big variance in pressure from the center reference point.
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Friday, Oct 31, 2014 at 13:36

Friday, Oct 31, 2014 at 13:36
Again you throw the baby out with the bath water, make thing out like they are harder than they are and add complications that are pretty well irrelivent.

This is not hard, this is not complicated and this is not difficult.



Of course there is engineering latitude in tyres otherwise they would be failing left, right and centre, because people in general fail to pay adequate attention to their tyres.

It is this engineering latitude that allows us to run tyres aired down within reason.

BUT when we eat into that engineering latitude by.

underinflating
overloading
running continuoulsy at high temperatures
using tyres that are very close to their load limit
and other things

we erode that latitude......and as many find, witnessed by the tyre repairers and testified on forums.....there will be failures.
The fact that there are not more failures is testiment to there being a latitude.

BUT within that latitude there is a whole range of reduced performance......and that does include premature wear and unnecessary failure.

Some may not realise they are experiencing reduced performance and simply accept the rate of wear and failures as normal and to be expected.





So ya think tyre pressures are not an exact science.....well I think you will find the major tyre companies and the tyre industry groups will disagree with that.

Tyre pressure would have to be one of the most straight forward and best researched variables we know about in vehicles.

Everything we could possibly want to know about tyres has been tested and proven, both in the lab and in real situations.

For those who want to know, there is plenty of very good information, very well documented and researched....and clearly expressed.

(AND Im not talking about the 3 or 6 or what ever PSI rule.)




BUT....there are a lot of people out there that think they know better than the companies that made the tyres and the engineers that selected them and specified the tyres and the pressures for their vehicles.

AND there remains large quantities of superstision and misinformation about tyres circulating.






Just because there is a wide variation of tyre pressures that people run......that proves very little.

What does prove a point is that there are thousands of tyres out there that have failed or worn out prematurely because of incorrect inflation.....AND there is thread after thread and post after post on internet forums where people have had failures, damage or premature wear on their tyres and simply have no clue as to why.

When the facts emerge the cuases are clear.






What completely gob smacks me, is that when there is a vehicle running factory stock tyres.......why a mechanic or high scool drop out tyre fitter would not simply look at the tyre plackard......... that all modern vehicles are legally required to display .....and inflate the tyres to the pressure specificed.

But no...plenty of them have their own opinion on what tyres should be inflated to.
"OH we inflate all this sort of tyre to 50psi"
"Na mate the car companies don't know what they are talking about"
"We always inflate tyres 6psi over"

Mechanics and tyre fitters ( sorry mate) would have to be the least reliable recommenders of tyre pressures........who knows why......







SO..where should you get the correct pressure......

this is not hard....this is not difficult.....this is not complicatred.


And before we talk about anything else.....we have to talk about "minimum cold inflation pressure".....its called that for a reason.


If you are running factory standard tyres......the tyre plackard is a good place to start...if you cant be bothered any further...just open the driver's door or the glove box and there it is.......all modern vehicles have one and your vehicle is unroadworthy without.

now that was not hard was it

If you have aftermarket tyres or want to take it a step further.

Get the tyre designation from the side of the tyre.....they all have them.

Get a load V pressure table for that tyre either from the standards manual or from the manufacturer...BTW every tyre shop has a coppy of the manual..or should have.

Then either work off the weights in the vehicle manual or weigh it on a public weigh bridge......most tips have a weigh bridge and it wont cost you a cent if you don't want a certificate.

then just look up the table and you are fine.

nothing hard, nothing complicated or time consuming.


Then at least you know where your starting point should be.

If you know and run accurate tyre pressures for the load carried you are then asured of best results and having the whole of that engineering latitude as safety margin...and not eaten away till all the latitude is gone.





OH...
I fact you contradict yourself...you see it fit to specifiy your own vehicle runs 45 in the front and 48 in the rear...if there was such great latitude why would you bother with a 3psi difference and if you where using a guage with a significant variance...how the hell would you know.

cheers
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Tuesday, Nov 04, 2014 at 18:42

Tuesday, Nov 04, 2014 at 18:42
QUOTE[ Again you throw the baby out with the bath water, make thing out like they are harder than they are and add complications that are pretty well irrelivent.

This is not hard, this is not complicated and this is not difficult.]

Yes good that you see my point of the matter, it's those talking accuracy and 1 psi increments that make it sound hard.

For me as long as my tyre pressures are are somewhere in the 34-48 psi range and the tyres on the same axle have the same pressures and they are not flat or over inflated then I am happy.

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Reply By: 801 - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 19:24

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 19:24
The accuracy of the pressure readings is also affected by the temperature of the tyre. If you set the pressures when the tyres are cold then take another reading after they've been sitting in the sun for a couple of hours the pressure readings will be different when you re-measure them. As long as you're putting in the pressures you want & they're measured under the same conditions the accuracy of the gauge to within a couple of psi is really not an issue.
Just get a gauge from a reputable dealer who will stand by the product if you have any issues & you'll be OK.
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Reply By: scottwittkopp - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 20:05

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 20:05
Three letters

ARB
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Reply By: Member - Steve O (QLD) - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 20:20

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 20:20
Hey thanks guys, hear what your saying, will hunt around and see what I can find in the $30 to$ 50 range
I thought there might have been a couple of "standouts" in gauges like there is in a lot of things...thought it was worth putting it out there, but from the general consensus if one can get within a couple of psi consistently it should all be good
Thankyou all for taking the time and making the effort to assist, it is appreciated
Cheers Steve.
AnswerID: 541061

Reply By: Member - Rod N (QLD) - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 20:38

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 20:38
After awhile and usage there is no guarantee the gauge will still be accurate. In a past life our gauges were calibrated against a standard gauge every few months. The standard was calibrated against a master every 12 months.
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Reply By: The Bantam - Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 22:09

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 22:09
A while go I was selling nice tyre guages on line.....I'm not at the moment and even if I was I would not say so because it is not the done thing on this forum.

How I got into it was like this.

way back in the 80s I went on a work trip away.....on the morning of the trip I pumped up my tyres to my normal highway pressures at a local service station...all good I thaught.

well I swore that the roads needed some maintenence and cursed Russ Hinze and Joh Bejelkie all the way Maryborough.

anyway next morning I fueld up and checked my tyre pressures.....they where like 15psi over what I wanted them to be...so I went into Repco....that was a serious trade supplier back then..... and baught the best tyre guage they had....it cost me about a days wages and I still have it...it was and still is a great guage....though it has always consistently read 2psi under.

ANYway..a few years back I went looking for a decent tyre guage to leave in the vehicle because the other one I wanted to keep in the workshop.

WELL....I looked in all the usual places and must have baught half a dozen guages..several of which cost enough for me to return them for refund.

There are heaps of crappy ones out there and just because you are paying good money don't guarantee a good unit.
many of the suppliers are not consistent either.

DR AIR used to have a realy nice dial tyre guage and it could be had in a number of places at a fair price......but it disapeared off the market to be replaced by another guage that looked very similar but was not of the same quality.

yes, many are as much as 3 to 5psi out..or more.
Some simply will not read consistently reading after reading varying 2 or 3 psi every time they are presented to the same tyre.

I swore off the electronic guages.....some of them are realy accurate when they are new....I mean seriloulsy accurate better than 0.5psi...but those that I had did not cope with heat, temperature and vibration..after a few weeks in the glovebox, they where just not accurate if they worked at all...and then there are the batteries.....they take small button batteries and have no isolating power switch so the batteries go flat in about a month..less if they are in the sun.

Some of the better stick guages are surprisingly accurate.....but they don't tolerate dust and sand.....AND..just try buying a good quality stick guage these days.

If you are looking for quality it either has to be a dial guage or a full sized tyre inflator like the garages use.

I know lots of us have seen service station tyre guages that are horribly inaccurate.....but what do you expect frm an instrument that is left in the weather 24/7 and dropped on the concrete 100 times a day.

I took some convincing, but the jmec/pem rolling scale tyre inflator and one or two of their coppies are prettyy danm consistent and pretty danm accurate....if they are looked after.

Now I'll give away my secret......no current commercial connection or interest.

I finally did find a guage from one of my suppliers and started selling them.

The guage I was selling comes from Auto King a automotive indusrty importer.

Its a 50mm dial guage that reads 0 to 60 psi, and is ideal for most 4wds..that is why it is sold as a 4wd tyre guage.

I have seen this same guage under a number of other brands.......DR AIR was selling this guage at one time.......not sure of current status...I saw a guage that looks very similar in tradetools...but without getting it out of the pack I cant identify it positivly.

They are a very nice guage and in my estimation good for about plus or minus 1psi.

I have tested them against other guages and against other guages the same.....they remain consistent, measurement after measurement and from guage to guage.

There are quite a number of 50mm dial guages on the market.....a lot of them are not real flash.....some of them will be this guage or a similar one from this manufacturer who I am yet to identify.

what too look for.

discount any plastic cassed guage right from the get go.

Look for a guage with a quality feel......the cheaper ones just dont feel as well finished or as firm in construction.

Look for a guage made in Tiawan.....some cheap coppies are made in china.

look for a serial number.....if the manufacturer does not care enough to give that guage an individual seriel number....be suspicious.

all the ones I have seen that I suspect comming from this manufacturer come in a plastic case with a black back part and clear front.....if the manufacturer does not supply a case they don't care....some of the poorer coppies also come in a similar case.

This particular guage is available in a 60psi and a 100psi version and they are both nice and accurate

I wanted to get one tested in a propper lab...but the cost was prohibitive.

when you get any tyre guage home...look at it carefully......then the first thing is to take several cosecutive measurements from the same tyre....be carefull not to let any air out while doing this......the guage should repeat bang on time after time...if it does not do this return it.

If a guage is not at least consistent it has no hope of being accurate.

From there, check your guage against a number of other guages of good repute in good condition.

I have seen the guage I was selling or something very very similar selling for between $25 and $60

Good guages of pretty good quality can be had and for a reasonable sum...but you realy have to look closely.....there is a lot of rubbish out there being sold well over the odds.

cheers
AnswerID: 541064

Follow Up By: Member - Steve O (QLD) - Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 08:20

Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 08:20
Bantam, Thankyou for your detailed reply,you have given me some good clues to attempt to track down a decent gauge, like you I don't mind paying good money to get a good product, but like you say it is very easy these days to pay good money and still get a crap product!
I will heed you comments and start scratching around.Thankyou again, cheers Steve.
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FollowupID: 827056

Follow Up By: olcoolone - Tuesday, Nov 04, 2014 at 18:44

Tuesday, Nov 04, 2014 at 18:44
Jeeeezzzzz anything you haven't done in your 130 years on this planet? LOL
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FollowupID: 827394

Reply By: Doc - Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 10:01

Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 10:01
Go into your nearest go-kart shop. Kart tyres are very pressure sensitive, and are often adjusted up or down by 1/2 a pound to change grip & handling. The gauges used by serious karters are generally both very accurate and also easy to read. I've got one (IKD brand I think) that I've had for years and it is great. It is around 50mm, has a rubber surround on the gauge to protect it, has a 30cm or so hose with a clip-on nozzle for connecting to the valve, holds the pressure reading when disconnected, and has a button to let air out / release the pressure reading. It also comes in a plastic case. Not cheap though. Mine is almost identical to this one - Kart tyre gauge
AnswerID: 541076

Follow Up By: The Bantam - Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 12:02

Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 12:02
Um..yep..that looks familiar..though Id have to handle it to know for sure.

The problem with that particular tyre guage is that it only reads to 40psi.

For 4wds you realy need a guage that reads 0 to 60 at least.

If you are running tyres that require pressures above 60psi you need one reading 0 to 100.

cheers
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FollowupID: 827070

Follow Up By: TomH - Tuesday, Nov 04, 2014 at 20:29

Tuesday, Nov 04, 2014 at 20:29
I have one that looks like that $20 from Supercrap that came with my workshop compressor

Also have a Bushranger $36 from Anaconda It also has a piece that you can move to deflate tyres without disconnecting it.

Both gauges read within 1lb of each other so I reckon thats good enough.
Also had an ARB and it had similar readings to the other two so must be some degree of accuracy or something.
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FollowupID: 827399

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