Chainsaws on the road.

Submitted: Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 10:59
ThreadID: 110420 Views:2413 Replies:10 FollowUps:14
This Thread has been Archived
Petrol,Electric or battery powered,the first two require carrying fuel directly or indirectly via generator to run them,how good are the battery operated ones in comparison ?
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Rosss - Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 11:14

Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 11:14
Mate has a 36 volt Ryobi Cordless, magic saw, wouldn't have anything else.
AnswerID: 542973

Reply By: Member - bungarra (WA) - Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 11:21

Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 11:21
I carried a small petrol for a few years

Switched to the 36v cordless Ryobi.....works a treat...little slower on cutting simply because of the rev's the chain does....but cuts well...good decision and happy with it
Life is a journey, it is not how we fall down, it is how we get up.
VKS 1341

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 542974

Reply By: AlbyNSW - Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 12:19

Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 12:19
What do you want a chainsaw for?

If you are just chopping up a bit of light material for a campfire anything will do but if you are in places like the Vic High country and need to clear a decent tree off the road you need a decent petrol saw
AnswerID: 542976

Follow Up By: River Swaggie - Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 15:02

Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 15:02
Yep I totally agree, I've come across trees across tracks, 7 in a matter of a couple of kms, no one had been there for awhile though .. Nothing but petrol would have cut it (pardon the pun)..

If you camp in areas with higher traffic flows you'll be ok,but sometimes that's contrary to the rule, a big tree can fall anytime, but if you like to explore off the beaten track you'll need petrol, sometimes it could be a 20-30km or more round trip if you cannot remove a tree ..

Also if your cutting a tree off a track allow enough for a hummer to get through, most only allow enough for a Suzuki Swift... Lol..

Cheers and have a Safe and Merry Xmas out there..
0
FollowupID: 829781

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 07:10

Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 07:10
"Also if your cutting a tree off a track allow enough for a hummer to get through, most only allow enough for a Suzuki Swift... Lol.. "

Doesn't that bug you!! At least make the opening the same width as the road/track.

And a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you also, mate.
0
FollowupID: 829805

Follow Up By: River Swaggie - Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 12:25

Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 12:25
Lol, sure does mate...

All The best to you and your family too..
1
FollowupID: 829824

Follow Up By: alhow - Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 20:53

Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 20:53
Absolutely, a decent sized saw should be carried throughout the high country and yes it's interesting how people cut access through fallen trees so tight. hard to understand the thinking as it doesn't take any more effort to make a little wider.
1
FollowupID: 829853

Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Tuesday, Dec 16, 2014 at 18:28

Tuesday, Dec 16, 2014 at 18:28
Totally agree Alby, anywhere in the bush you can become logged in as it were. A storm passing through can have you stranded in a matter of minutes. A good saw is essential, even if you are camping in a National Park as trees come down there too.

I know it is illegal to take them in there but what do you do in an emergency and no communication. If you take them in don't use them for firewood and keep them out of sight. This is not law breaking, it is covering your ar-- rear.

Many moons ago (1970), 2 mates were cutting timber in the bush about 10 mile out and a huge storm came through. It took them 5 hours to cut their way home, half of that was on a main gravel road. They were sleeper cutting at the time and could handle a sharp saw.

Cheers, Bruce.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 829885

Reply By: Idler Chris - Vic - Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 12:20

Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 12:20
Depends on where you go. An electric one with the chain kept very sharp will suit most. In the northern parts of Oz the timber gets much harder which can leave the electric saws struggling. Try cutting gidgee at night and it throws sparks the wood is so hard.
What other people think of me is none of my business.
Do unto others what you would have them do unto you.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 542977

Reply By: Member - Silverchrome - Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 12:30

Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 12:30
I'd go for battery...the technology is pretty good now. I have an 18V Black n Decker and its one of the most useful tools I have for use around the house (primary reason). But we take it with us when travelling but have only used it a few times on the road.
AnswerID: 542979

Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 12:58

Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 12:58
My experience with batteries is that you charge them up, don't use them for weeks, and the darn things are always flat, just as you want to use them. [:-(

My Still travels in an ex-army ammunition box with a slot cut in it for the blade, and a plastic blade protector on the blade and chain.
I keep a couple of bottles of oil (2-stroke oil and bar oil) in the box with the saw, along with basic chainsaw tools and a spark plug, and I carry a 5 litre poly fuel container with 2 stroke mix in it.
It's been travelling like that since 1989. It's done a lot of work, it's on its second bar and about its fourth chain, and it still starts first or second pull.

I've often had to remove sizeable trees that have blocked roads and tracks, particularly after strong winds or a bushfire.
I wouldn't like to attack a sizeable eucalypt with a battery-powered saw.
You'd probably be starting off with a half-flat battery to start with, so you'd more than likely run out of power before you got 'er done.

If you carry a 36V battery, it needs charging regularly - so it's only going to be a workable solution if you're carrying a genset, too, to my way of thinking.

Bottom line I guess, is how likely you are going to be regularly travelling through moderately-heavily treed country.
I used to travel the remote areas of the Southern Goldfields of W.A. a lot and the country is fairly heavily treed.

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 542981

Follow Up By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 13:31

Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 13:31
Ron
Not to steal the thread but containers for fuel and bar oil.
I have found that the one litre bottles of diggers inflamable products at the hardware fit neatly inside pvc downpipe.
I fashioned a plywood plug top and bottom to keep the bottle in place with the top one with a hole to allow the screw on cap accessible. Easy to pack and resists damage.
Petrol saw is the go.
Living is a journey,it depends on where you go !
VKS 737 mobile 0049 selcall 0049

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 829778

Follow Up By: River Swaggie - Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 15:06

Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 15:06
Great idea there pinko I must look into that, I have a couple of the shellite containers left over , I have my maps in the 100mm sewer pipe with screw cap one end ,your way I could even store on my roof rack if I trust there leak proof ..

Cheers mate.
0
FollowupID: 829782

Follow Up By: Batt's - Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 22:33

Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 22:33
If your fuel container was to leak inside the pvc pipe wouldn't it cause a chemical reaction and start to break down the pvc if it's not made of fuel resistant material rendering it a dangerous storage container. I think the metal ammo box would be the best option.
0
FollowupID: 829798

Follow Up By: River Swaggie - Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 12:29

Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 12:29
Although with shellite I use the red Trangie fuel containers anyway, I would also like to test this as the sewer pipe can handle a lot of crap..

I like the idea to stack or lay down, it will save space instead of the bloody milk create..
0
FollowupID: 829825

Reply By: pop2jocem - Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 13:26

Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 13:26
Just my opinion. I have carried a bow saw and axe for as many years as I have been 4WDing. Only ever used them for gathering campfire wood. I have in the past winched smallish trees of tracks although very infrequently. Anything that is too big to be winched or dragged off a track is in my opinion not the sort of job I would try to tackle with a battery powered chain saw. A reasonably sized petrol saw would be needed. Even a reasonable quality saw with a charged up battery and nice sharp chain is not going to (if you will excuse the pun) cut it. Just a bit of campfire sized wood should be OK.
As others have said, it depends where you are traveling and your purpose for considering taking a powered saw.

Cheers
Pop
AnswerID: 542983

Reply By: Bushranger1 - Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 14:55

Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 14:55
G'day Mike,
"I love the smell of 2 stroke in the morning"!

Cant beat a petrol chainsaw when the going gets tough. Wouldn't be without my reliable Stihl saw. Reckon you cant go wrong with a Stihl, Husky or Echo saw but if you won't be using it much one of the cheapies might suffice.

Just make sure if you go for a 2 stroke saw use fuel stabilizer in the mix so it's always ready to go after sitting around between uses. Modern fuels tend to go stale pretty quick & will gum up your fuel system if you don't add stabilizer. I use STA-BIL brand but there are a few different ones around.
Also use 2 stroke oil rated for AIR cooled engines & not for outboards.

Cheers
Stu
AnswerID: 542986

Follow Up By: Krooznalong - Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 14:15

Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 14:15
Hey Stu
Have never used stabilizer - I just run it dry if I know it'll be sitting around for a while. 20+ years and the little Husky is still going well.
0
FollowupID: 829833

Follow Up By: Bushranger1 - Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 16:05

Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 16:05
Yea that works too.
I like to keep my saws fueled up ready to go as I live in the bush & sometimes have to clear the road out at short notice after storms have bought down trees.
0
FollowupID: 829839

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 23:40

Sunday, Dec 14, 2014 at 23:40
Used to carry a petrol chainsaw. Hate petrol.
Now carry a 240V sabre saw and run it from the inverter. Very light and compact.
I can cut a bulbar in half with it. Try that with your chainsaw. :)

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome.
AnswerID: 543002

Follow Up By: Member Kerry W (WA) - Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 00:36

Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 00:36
Well actually, ...... some Sthil saws come with an optional tungsten carbide tipped chain. - They will easily chew aluminium.

Just sayin'
Kerry W (Qld)
Security is mostly a superstition. It doesnt exist in nature. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.
-Helen Keller

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 829804

Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 12:50

Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 12:50
Try a steel one, or a chassis or a steel bumper bar or tow bar. The reciprocal saw will handle them all or a pretty big tree with a long timber blade.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome
0
FollowupID: 829829

Follow Up By: alhow - Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 21:04

Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 21:04
Not in the high country, lol!

For safety sake people need to be realistic especially for the those reading being a little 'green' on the subject.

1
FollowupID: 829855

Reply By: gbc - Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 09:28

Monday, Dec 15, 2014 at 09:28
We use a cheap $99 ozito petrol saw from bunnings for travel. It was left over from a commercial job at work and has surprisingly never missed a beat. It is also an excellent climbing saw. We also have an electric saw and a mcullough pro mac (yes original).... each saw for their own job and I do like an electric saw but in the bush the versatility of petrol vs the pain to carry the stinky little thing is well worth it in my opinion.
AnswerID: 543012

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)