Carrying 2 stroke fuel

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 09:53
ThreadID: 110731 Views:2021 Replies:10 FollowUps:9
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I like to travel light and frugally and don't see the point in using up valuable space and weight carrying more fuel than needed.
I am looking for a storage container to carry fuel for my chainsaw and are looking for a suitable container in the 500ml to 2 litre sizing. 1 litre would probable be ideal for me.
Does anyone have any suggestions? There are plenty of 4 and 5 litre ones available which I already have so looking smaller

thanks in advance.
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Reply By: Member Andys Adventures - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 10:12

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 10:12
Try an old oil bottle, and keep in cool place.
AnswerID: 544221

Reply By: Member - John - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 10:13

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 10:13
ebay, I have some similar to these for fire lighter, haven't looked at all of them, should be a lot cheaper than this one. Hate that, can't add pics for some reason. Follow the link....... http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Fuel-Bottle-1-Litre-/321591925708?#ht_1874wt_1363
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 15:38

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 15:38
Thanks I had a mate who used to use this type for his Shellite stove, Have been to 3 camping stores looking for them but no luck.

Funny I have even done a search on Ebay for small fuel containers with no luck but you managed to find them
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Reply By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 10:27

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 10:27
AlbyNSW
My thoughts on large containers are the same as yours.
The one litre inflammable products in the hardware store IE. Diggers brand turps,kero,metho etc with the large safety cap.
It happens that those bottles fit neatly inside 70mm pvc stormwater pipe.
I made a 16mm plywood plug for the bottom and another for the top with a hole to let the bottle cap come through. The length of tube is long enough to protect the bottle cap and the ply plug pushes down on the shoulder of the bottle to keep it tight.
The ply plugs are fastened from the outside through the pvc with brass nails or screws.
I keep shellite, 2 stroke and unleaded in three separate bottles. Been doing this for three years.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 15:40

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 15:40
Thanks, that sounds like a good system you have going there.
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Reply By: Tuco - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 10:32

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 10:32
Get one of these ...
1 litre fuel bottle

I have been using a Castrol Super 2 Stroke oil bottle for premix since 1975 when I had a 2 Stroke OSSA motorcycle. Castrol have changed the design and style of bottle many times in that time. Fortunately the opaque one (with side level marks) isn't affected by petrol. Many plastics don't like petrol.

Cheaper aluminium drink bottles can be sourced from the likes of Reject Shop and some camp shops.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 16:21

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 16:21
Thanks for that, I like that one in the link you posted as well
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Reply By: Member - Tony (ACT) - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 11:09

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 11:09
I use two 500 ml plastic oil bottles one for fuel and one for bar oil. They fit in a cut off 5 lt oil container along with spare chains.

Lasted 6 months on a trip last year, used for cutting fire wood.

This along with 10 lt of gennie fuel, all fit in the gennie slideout locker.
AnswerID: 544226

Reply By: Member - Mark (Tamworth NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 14:12

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 14:12
Alby
When I am carrying my fuel stove in my backpack on long bushwalks I use specialised 500mL-1L fuel bottles for carrying metho, petrol & shellite,. They are one of the safest containers you can get and very robust. They have a small tap at the top that allows you to accurately dribble out small volumes if required.
But they are expensive, $25-30 each for the Trangia brand. You'll find them in any good camping shop that sells back pack fuel stoves.
AnswerID: 544237

Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 16:08

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 16:08
Thanks Mark
That was the style I initially had in mind
I tried a BCF and Anaconda and they did not have them at the time. A few have posted links to them on line also so will chase them up
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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 15:29

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 15:29
I used to carry a chain saw and fuel and oil and a spare chain and sharpening stuff.
Now I leave it home.
Sometimes I carry a 240V sabre saw and run it from the inverter.
Cuts anything.

Cheers,
Peter
AnswerID: 544245

Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 16:24

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 16:24
Peter I don't bother either unless I am going to heavily timbered areas.

I do own two sabre saws and an electric chainsaw for home use but you would be seriously under gunned with them in places like the High Country
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Reply By: Rod W - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 15:37

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 15:37
You seem to contradict youself in that you like to travel light and frugally and don't see the point in using up valuable space and then in the next sentence you're carrying a chainsaw that requires fuel.
So get rid of the chainsaw which eliminates the need for fuel thus you not using vauable space and become more lighter and frugal. Why do you need a chainsaw in any case. I bet you also carry an axe?
AnswerID: 544247

Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 16:18

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 16:18
Rod you obviously have never been to places like the Vic high country otherwise you wouldn't have made such a remark.

There is a difference between travelling light and travelling unprepared.

I don't take my chainsaw when I go to central Australia or the deserts but it is wise to have one in heavily timbered areas.
I was in the high country again just two weeks ago and was glad I was not the one who had to remove some of the trees that had been across the tracks in the days prior.

I hope this makes sense to you.

I don't carry an axe by the way

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 16:38

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 16:38
Absolutely agree, Alby.

The standing dead trees that were killed by fires in the last 10 years or so are now starting to fall regularly. I think it is now unwise to go into fire-affected alpine areas (and that is much of it) without a chainsaw.

Just a couple of months ago I went up to Geehi dam through fire-affected country. Had a clear run, but thought to myself "I wonder if my luck will be as good on the way back?"

It wasn't.

In the couple of hours I spent poking around the dam and surrounds, a dead tree had fallen across the only access track and I had to clear it.

There was no wind - these things just give up and fall at any time.

For the same reason you also need to be very careful about choosing a bush campsite. "It'll be right for one night" is very likely to be wrong. (Nat Park campsites have generally been made safe.)

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Follow Up By: Rod W - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 21:58

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 21:58
Yep that makes sense but an axe takes up less space.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 22:14

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 22:14
Rod unless you can swing an axe like the guys at the Royal Easter Show you would be setting up camp next to some of these trees whilst you worked your way through them
There is a lot of timber that comes down up there and some massive ones at that
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Reply By: gbc - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 16:03

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 16:03
Google up sigg fuel bottles. You won't get better or safer for small volumes of fuel.
AnswerID: 544250

Reply By: Ron N - Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 16:41

Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 at 16:41
Alby, don't make the mistake of buying a narrow-neck fuel bottle.
These things are often designed to normally connect to a stove via a coupler.
A narrow neck bottle is a PIA to refill.
Acquire a wide mouth bottle, you can refill them easier and see the amount of fuel in them.
SOTO make a 1000ml wide mouth fuel bottle, but I'm not sure how easy they are to acquire.

Cheers, Ron.
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