Numbers on the back of vans

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 21:04
ThreadID: 110839 Views:2599 Replies:11 FollowUps:14
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Placing chn 40 /18 ect on the back of vans do the trucks call you and say coming round ect what is the % that call you before you call them .
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Reply By: Member - Michael P (QLD) - Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 21:16

Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 21:16
new boy,
I've had ch 40 plus a call sign (both very visible) on the back of my van for many years & had only 2 calls one from a guy in a ute wanting a chat & one from a truckie telling me that I had a flat tyre. The poor soul didn't realise that I can see the tyres in the rear view mirrors.
Caravans will get very little good will from truckies, if any. IMO.
Save Your time & money.
Mike.
AnswerID: 544720

Follow Up By: TomH - Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 22:45

Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 22:45
He probably thought that because you hadnt stopped you couldnt see it, perhaps he was right.
Far better that he told you than let you have an accident.

A rather one eyed view of truckies who we found very good if you were good to them.
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Reply By: Member - bungarra (WA) - Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 21:53

Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 21:53
Have 40 & 18 on the back of the 'van

Not uncommon for a truckie to call me up and advise he is coming past...in which case I tell him I will back off once he is running straight and draws level......that way he gets past quicker and back on the right side of the road

Other times a truckie will call me around him once he has a clear view...they sit higher in the cab and can often tell much further in advance how safe the and long the next opportunity for me to pass is...

OR I will call them and ask them to talk me around when safe to do so

Wouldn't travel without it




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Reply By: Motherhen - Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 22:17

Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 22:17
Hardly ever, and we have a large UHF 40 on the rear of the caravan. When we started out, my husband would call and let the truck driver know he was aware of them and would give them room when suitable. The answer would be "Stay as you are mate. I will pass you in xx kilometres". After initiating, they'd say "Coming round you now". Otherwise no contact from them.

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Reply By: Rob J8 - Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 22:18

Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 22:18
Had 40 on the back of two vans but truckies didn't call so haven't bothered with this one. I find the truckies in the North of WA will answer if you call them but on the East coast not so much. Maybe too many vans on the road
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Follow Up By: TomH - Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 22:42

Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 at 22:42
Possibly because they use Chan29 on the East Coast.

Also we found ch 18 was useless.
All you could hear was a couple travelling in tandem yakking about some inane things that was more annoying than anything.

We always uses ch 40 and talked to the truckies and ASKED if they wanted us to do anything to help get them past.

As already said they would often say will get you in x km as they know the roads and the best places to get past.

They were however appreciative of a headlight flash when their tail got clear of us.

The absolute worst thing is to have a CB and not turn the blxxxy thing on.
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Follow Up By: Kevin E1 - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 09:01

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 09:01
It's ch 40 on the Bruce hwy in Qld,
29 in NSW
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 23:23

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 23:23
I don't turn mine on unless I'm off road, I don't need my family listening to foul mouthed bogans!

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Reply By: vk1dx - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 01:17

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 01:17
I used to call them to say Hi and one day gave up and don't bother now. Not one answered. I figured that they won't talk to 4WD's without a van hanging on the back.
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 01:43

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 01:43
This bit didn't make it. Oh for an editor. Maybe a new computer would help as well. But the cost!!!

"Now I just wave etc".
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Reply By: Member - Richard L8 - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 08:40

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 08:40
Hi All, I'm all new to UHF's as well. Just going through setting up my UHF ready for our around Aus trip in March. What other channels do you guys use when setting up your scan feature?
AnswerID: 544741

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 13:35

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 13:35
Scan 'em all Richard, and use "Group Scan", not "Open Scan". Surprising what you hear at times. :-)

Channels 22 & 23 are reserved for telepathy type activities only, and are often quite irritating when they are transmitting.

Ch 31 - 38 (on old 40 ch sets) are repeater input channels, and you'll only get one side of the conversation if you are receiving them.

Bob
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Follow Up By: Member - Fab72 (Paradise SA) - Saturday, Jan 24, 2015 at 09:05

Saturday, Jan 24, 2015 at 09:05
Bob...telepathy? Wouldn't need a UHF if you were capable of telepathy.
I'd say maybe telemetry.

Fab.
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Saturday, Jan 24, 2015 at 09:47

Saturday, Jan 24, 2015 at 09:47
Ha ha, well spotted, Fab!

Looked at that when I wrote it, that doesn't look right??? Checked the Thesaurus on iPad, and it had less success than I.

Then thought of "telemetry" later on. Thought I'd leave it, and see who notices.......

Must be my advancing years? Had a bit to do with telemetry some years back, but yet to try the telepathy thingy. :-)

Thanks,
Bob

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Reply By: Member - Alan H (QLD) - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 09:02

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 09:02
I like to sit on 40 on major truck routes to get to hear about wide loads so I can get off the road for them. Usually pick up the pilot well before you see them.

Nothing worse when towing to go around a blind bend to find a wide load and no where to pull off.

In the bush and in the hills we just pick a channel for our convoy.

Big trap when travelling say in the desert (usually on 10) is to expect that all oncoming traffic will be on air. You have to expect a vehicle which may not have a radio and drive accordingly

Alan
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Follow Up By: Kumunara (NT) - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 09:56

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 09:56
Alan

The vehicles without the UHF. Are they the same ones that don't have a sandflag.



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Follow Up By: Member - Alan H (QLD) - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 09:58

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 09:58
Probably are!!!!!
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Reply By: Gronk - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 09:51

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 09:51
Often see the ch number and the peoples names.....often been tempted to call and see if they are happy to talk or just a grumpy old pair of grey nomads ????

I find if I go 2 k/ph over the speed limit, truckies don't bother me !
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Reply By: Athol W1 - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 09:59

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 09:59
We normally travel with the radio on Ch 40, and when NOT travelling the Pacific or Bruce Highways we normally call up the trucks when seen from behind. Generally we get a good response when I offer to back off if and when they wish, though often they advise me to maintain my current speed. About 20% will advise me of their intention to pass at which time I back off as soon as I see them pull out.

I always give them a flash when the last trailer has passed.

We do normally travel at or close to the posted speed limits (except in NT), but still get overtaken by heavy vehicles.

Ch 40 is also essential in WA, especially on the Great Northern Highway, for knowing when the wide loads are approaching. Last year there were several wide loads of 8 metres, and there is absolutely NO room on the road for and other vehicles, not even motor bikes.
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 14:04

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 14:04
The company I work for has all their prime movers, used for road train duties, set at 89-90 kph. So don't get to do too much overtaking.........of anything!

But there's always someone slow and steady, and it's reassuring to see a "Ch 40" sign on back of the 'van, so you can communicate your intentions. Nothing worse than someone you've been following for a few clicks, suddenly deciding "he can pass here" and they slow right down, giving you a mere 600 metres straight stretch, with a crest/blind corner at the end, to overtake in a 53M 100 tonne sports car. Definitely not good for the nerves!!!

Lot of trucks won't call, and even coming around another truck, you'll often only hear a brief "I'll have a look at ya, mate". It' s obvious if he's only taken a few minutes to catch you, after appearing in the mirror, that he'll round you up at the first safe opportunity.

One bit of advice. If you're calling up a truck, it's often best to try to identify them......."copy in westbound Shaws, Toll, NQX or green 'n white Kenworth". You'll hear blokes call "copy in the road train". And there could be a dozen scattered along 20 kms of highway.....often no one answers.

I've called different 'vans and campers up at times, maybe to ask about their van or whatever. Some are very friendly, but others often give you a sense that they'd rather you didn't ask..........maybe because I was in a truck?

It would be if everyone had a UHF in their vehicle, especially when sharing the highways with lots of other vans and heavy vehicles.

Bob



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Follow Up By: new boy - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 20:50

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 20:50
Hi Bob you sound like one of the rare ones who do call us vaners I guess because you are one.
My question was based on whether it,s worth putting the number on the back I already use 40 and know how to assist a truck past .From the replys seem waste of money effort and just keep doing as I am.
You raised one very interesting point about identifying the approaching truck but also it would help them to know who is calling ie. "Kenworth north bound coming up to coromal van"and go from there.
I have never had an issue with a trucky 98% will repsond in some form be it short and sweet to thinking will he never get off the other 2 % wont.I even had one bloke accross the Nullabor who wanted to take my fuel pump off and check it for me no way ,and ofcourse flat treesless plain he was still going when I was 20 ks infront.
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 22:07

Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 22:07
Ha ha, some blokes don't mind a chat, eh?

Reading your follow-up, it occurred to me that some of the "quiet" blokes may well be listening to talking books. Know quite a few drivers who always have a talking book or two, when AM radio just won't cut it. Maybe they don't want to talk in case they miss some of the story?

Bob

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Reply By: Member - Fab72 (Paradise SA) - Saturday, Jan 24, 2015 at 09:31

Saturday, Jan 24, 2015 at 09:31
G'day,
I'm on both sides of the fence. I drive a truck and I tow a van.

When I'm driving the truck, I generally don't call up the van vehicle because through experience I've found than few people actually have their UHF on. Secondly, only I can make a sound determination as to how long a stretch of road I need to get past them. In their rear view mirrors, they can't see my load, have no idea how heavy I am, how many horses my rig has or where I'm going. If I'm turning off at the next town, I'll just sit back.....10 minutes longer isn't that critical that it warrants an overtaking manoeuvre. Then last but not least, I'm sitting a lot higher so I can see a lot further.

As a van tower.... I initiate the conversation by making contact when the truck becomes identifiable. No point saying "Hey you in the truck behind me". Once I can clearly identify the truck by colour, make, company and direction of travel, then I'll simply say example "Copy the north bound blue and yellow Freightliner low-loader".
They'll generally reply "yeah mate."...or something like that. Then I'll identify myself, this is where a bit of road humour goes a long way, "Yeah mate I'm up front in the Pajero towing the Jayco road block, sing out if you want me to back her down".
Now the important thing....DON'T TELL THE TRUCK DRIVER WHEN TO PASS....simply let it be known that you've got your UHF actually on, that you've acknowledged his presence, and have enough road sense to know that for everyone's safety when he/she is overtaking you will slow it down DURING...not before, the overtaking manoeuvre.
Then the final part is letting the truck know when he's safely past your car by saying a simple "Job done mate". He'll generally thank you and wish you safe travels... in some cases he may further initiate a conversation although these are kept brief due to not wanting to clog up the channel.
Simple....that's all there is to it.

Now on narrow dirt outback tracks things get a bit different at times. An example of this is when towing triple stock crates. They are VERY top heavy and slow. Generally speaking it will be the caravaner or 4X4er doing the overtaking. Based on the camber of the road or the direction of any cross winds, the truck driver will call you past when it's safe for you to pass and safe for him/her to move to the edge of the track without flipping it or ending up in a dry bog. He/she, if they are experienced will generally call you past on the up wind side too so he/she is not clouding you in dust. It's not uncommon to be called past on the left hand side of the road as the truck moves to the right. again... the only way the truck knows you're there will be by you making the initial contact.

That's my 5 cents worth. Travel safe.
Fab.
AnswerID: 544799

Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Saturday, Jan 24, 2015 at 10:03

Saturday, Jan 24, 2015 at 10:03
Great post, Fab. Thanks
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Saturday, Jan 24, 2015 at 22:36

Saturday, Jan 24, 2015 at 22:36
On the Mt Lyell mine road, a truck plus a few trailers was coming towards us and slipping around a bit. He was on my side so I just called said "Stay there I will cross over". All good and a wave as we passed.

Good post Fab.
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