Rust prevention.

Submitted: Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 at 19:49
ThreadID: 111251 Views:2557 Replies:7 FollowUps:7
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Hi folks, any suggestions based on experience would be appreciated. The vehicle in question is a Defender so it has steel frames with aluminium sheet for the doors ( dissimilar metals!!) It is in pretty good shape but does have some surface rust appearing on the lower parts of three of the door frames and the passenger side footwell.
I have generously splashed Phosphoric acid on the areas after scratching away the flaky bits.
So here is the question, I have Lanotec and Fisoilene, one stinks to high heaven and the other one is OK. Anyone used both? And which one stays on longer? Cheers, Kanga.
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 at 20:15

Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 at 20:15
Kanga,

You ever seen a rusty fish? :-). Go with the fisholene.....

The couple of times I've used it, it dries to glossy finish. Imagine prep would be the thing, removing the rust before applying the Fisholene.

Bob

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 00:05

Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 00:05
Rusty fish? Yes Bob, there is a whole gallery of them right here..........

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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 06:10

Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 06:10
Ha ha, Allan! Got me again.........:-/

Bob

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Follow Up By: Neil & Pauline - Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 12:26

Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 12:26
Alternatively have you ever seen a rusty sheep (lanolin)



Neil
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Reply By: dermie66 - Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 at 21:15

Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 at 21:15
Hi Kanga

I've been using a mix of fisholene and Tectyl 506 for over 20 years, works really well, only smells for the first week. Its a bit soft, subject to stone chipping on the exposed chassis etc but fine on 'internals'.

regards
dermie
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Reply By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 at 22:46

Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 at 22:46
As an own Landy owner from way back, I know where you're coming from.
You could try http://knockout-rust.com.au/.
I've been using it for a few years now and reckon it's a cracker of a product. In my opinion superior to both Tectyl and Fisholene.
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Reply By: swampfox - Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 at 23:59

Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 at 23:59
hi
Valvoline Tectyl 506 good . Never mixed with fisholene, sounds like a good idea
The company who makes tectyl makes better products but they r not imported by valvoline oz

Fuchs oil does have rust preventive also ,a huge range and they available with in Australia
Import vehicles did used to be transported with a heavy wax which was very hard to remove . Give Fuchs a call they may have something similar.

Swampfox
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 21:38

Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 21:38
50/50 Tectyl 506 and fish oil has been a great rust preventative in the crash trade for years, dries to a bit of a skin and doesn't smell too bad (you can get a low odour fish oil too I think I've see none marketed at some stage).

I have to ask . . . can you get the fuchs outta there once applied ?? :D :D
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Follow Up By: dermie66 - Saturday, Feb 28, 2015 at 22:46

Saturday, Feb 28, 2015 at 22:46
Hi Swampfox

I remember using Tectyl 122 in the early 90s, it was a black finish. You're right, it was bl00dy good, better than 506, which i guess is why the took it off the Oz market.

cheers
dermie
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Reply By: Batt's - Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 12:29

Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 12:29
If you're able to scratch away flaky bits what's stopping you from rubbing it back with sandpaper and painting it then you will have gotten rid of the problem instead of hiding it. The rust will still slowly be getting worse you have just covered it up and slowed it down. These products can be rubbed off if it's in an exposed area high traffic area and paint and clear coat will stand up a lot better. I use tectyl and lanolin but never to hide rust.
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 12:31

Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 12:31
You could always try an erps but that's another story lol.
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Follow Up By: Kanga1 - Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 13:52

Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 13:52
The exterior parts of the channels in the doors are straight forward to get to, the insides of the channels however are impossible to get to which is where it will be using the Fishoilene/Lanotec, the surface rust was already hidden by the door cards! Thanks for the suggestion. Cheers, Kanga.
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Reply By: snow - Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 22:02

Friday, Feb 27, 2015 at 22:02
I used sump oil throughout the chassis and inside panels of a 4x4 years ago, was on the beach 3 days a week most week for long time and rust never became an issue for the duration that I had the vehicle at least.
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Reply By: Ron N - Saturday, Feb 28, 2015 at 09:42

Saturday, Feb 28, 2015 at 09:42
I've treated the steel chassis of a 109 Landrover with Exit-Rust, over 15 yrs ago, and it has performed perfectly as a steel rust-preventative in all that time.
Exit-Rust leaves a dark-blue, iron tannate coating on the steel.
This coating chemically removes all rust and stabilises the surface of the metal and continues to prevent rust from forming.

Iron tannate comes from the bark of poplar trees, and this is the reason there is little rust in areas where poplar trees predominate.
You may have seen the Russian tank video, where a WW2 tank was hauled from a pond in a forest in Eastern Europe, after more than 60 years under the water.
The tank was rust free due to the poplar trees that lined the ponds banks. The trees had added iron tannate to the pond water and thus preserved the tank.

Phosphoric acid is O.K., but it can be washed off easily, and rust reforms when it is washed off.

Fishoil is well known as a rust preventative, but it can smell for quite a while.

Another product I use is Metalfix rust-preventative paint. It's expensive, but it is 100% effective.
The paint is water based, and it contains phosphoric acid and it reacts with rust to neutralise it, and then seals the surface.
It has no smell, is totally non-toxic, and you can wash your paintbrush out in water.

All you do is scrape off the flaky rust, wash the surface to be treated, let it dry and paint it.

The paint dries quickly and sets hard and resists 1000 degree temperature, acids, oils, pure salt water, and 100 other corrosive elements with outstanding ability.
You can paint over the top of Metalfix with any other paint.

Cheers, Ron.
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