Puncture Repair

Submitted: Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 10:25
ThreadID: 11351 Views:4946 Replies:12 FollowUps:6
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The Falcon has a large screw in the centre of the tread. The tyre didn't go flat but as soon as I remove it it'll go flat. With no experience can I perform a durable and permanent repair with the repair kit as sold by super cheap. It's comprised of a tool that's used for reaming the hole and another for stuffing some material into the hole, also some glue but I'm not sure what I do with it. So, should I duck back down to super cheap and and purchase the kit at $23 or take the tyre to a pro.
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Reply By: Davoe - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 10:40

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 10:40
self repairs are for when you are in the bush and need a repair done. Unless you are bored or broke take it down to bob jane or whereever and save yourself the backache
AnswerID: 50823

Follow Up By: Mad Dog Morgan (Geelong) - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 10:56

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 10:56
Thanks Davoe. I have no experience with repairing punctures on or off the wheel. I wouldn't mind some hands on experience so I know what I'm doing when the situation arises in the bush but not at the expense of the wife and kids safety who use the Falcon mostly.
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FollowupID: 312587

Follow Up By: Member Eric - Friday, Mar 19, 2004 at 22:41

Friday, Mar 19, 2004 at 22:41
have used a similar kit for years , works great , takes a little getting use to , once you get the hang of it , its roses . give it a go mate , best to learn in the city not the bush
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Reply By: Willem - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 11:08

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 11:08
Ray...Take it down to the tyreshop and have it fixed.

I repair all my 4x4 tyres out bush or at home. But I run splits which makes the job easier. I take all my other car tyre repairs to the tyreshop.

Cheers,

AnswerID: 50828

Follow Up By: Mad Dog Morgan (Geelong) - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 11:35

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 11:35
With this type of repair there is no need to take the tyre of the rim Willem.
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Follow Up By: Willem - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 12:01

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 12:01
I know that, Ray. Why don't you just do it then. These plugs have been around for years. I am surprised you haven't had to repair a puncture before :-)

Cheers
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FollowupID: 312591

Reply By: jackablue - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 11:24

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 11:24
I've used the similar type in the bushranger series. The handle seems to be better as it is a T shape rather than a screwdriver type handle as on the super cheap one.
I've done two repairs on my small car at home. Both have worked fantastic & it is good practice to try it at home before you have to in the middle of nowhere.

Cheers

Jackablue
AnswerID: 50831

Follow Up By: Mad Dog Morgan (Geelong) - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 11:42

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 11:42
What does one do with the glue Jack, put a bit in the hole or rub it into the repair material ? The instructions don't say. Super cheap had two kits. The cheaper one at $13 had a screwdriver type handle the other at $23 was a T handle.
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FollowupID: 312590

Follow Up By: jackablue - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 12:21

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 12:21
Just put a dab on the hole & when you push the plug through it also gets coated. I got mine from Auto 1. TJM also sell them. Mine has done me fine for 2 years & the 2nd repair 10 months. The T handle would just give you a better grip when pulling it back out. I think I looked at the supercheap T version but decided that the bushranger model had a stronger looking handle for the same price. $17.00 - $21.00
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FollowupID: 312595

Reply By: Davoe - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 11:50

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 11:50
I think the screw and plug type repair is no longer used by tyre shops as a repair and an internal patch is used. I also think the screw and plug kits tell you it is only for temporary repair will stand corrected if I am wrong. Not to bad an idea to learn how to fix a tyre at home rather than buy a kit tyre pliers etc and have to try and work out how to use it when out bush
AnswerID: 50834

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 12:09

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 12:09
Hey Ray, dont know if anyone else has mentioned this, but take it to Bob Jane, or a tire place... :P
AnswerID: 50835

Reply By: Member - MightyQ - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 12:16

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 12:16
G'day Mad Dog, Hey man if you want to fix it yourself go ahead, go to a reputable motorcycle shop and ask for a Metzler Tyre plug kit, it may cost more than the supercheap one but it's far better quality. I used them when racing and the results were very good
AnswerID: 50837

Reply By: Cobra - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 13:05

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 13:05
I use the ARB kit, works well in the bush, BUT, these plugs are for emergency use only and the tyre needs to be professionally repaired as soon as possible. Apparently, it is illegal run a tyre that has not been professionally plugged.
AnswerID: 50847

Reply By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 15:07

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 15:07
$10 bucks at the local trye place, just tell them you want to put the wheel back on!
I had a tyre fixed last year then a week later I was cruising down the highway and 3 studs sheared off and my back wheel went spinning past me at 100km/h!!
AnswerID: 50873

Reply By: Member - Bernie. (Vic) - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 15:54

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 15:54
Hi Ray
Why dont you try ( practice) your plug repair see if it holds Ok for a couple days , then go and get it repaired properly at tyre place. The first time I did temperary plug it did not seal 100% & now I know where I went wrong.

Cheers
AnswerID: 50882

Reply By: awill4x4 - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 19:49

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 19:49
Interestingly, the boss at work also had a screw embedded in his Falcon tyre today so he took it to the local tyre place to be repaired. His Falcon is a new BA XR6 ute with the factory 17" mags & tyres. He went back a couple of hours later and the tyre guy told him he eventually got it patched but that there was no guarantee it would be successful. When asked why, he said the factory Ford tyres come in this new "Silica" compound which we all have heard different tyre manufacturers saying is the best thing since sliced bread. The only problem is, the glues for the patches don't stick to them very well.
Simple, my boss thought. Why don't you just chuck a tube in it? Sorry, low profile 17" rubber, no tubes available.
So he accepted the repair but he doesn't know how successful it will be.
Regards Andrew.
AnswerID: 50932

Reply By: brian - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 21:15

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 21:15
Hello truckster not a criticism but a question are you of american decent as you often have american/non australian spelling in your replies.Yes i know many more inportant issues out there but i hate the way the australian public accept/endorse american influences at the cost of their/our own culture.as a nation why do we do it,are we that weak???Guess Lee Keirnigan's song about going back to the values of the 1950's has some merit.
AnswerID: 50954

Reply By: uther - Friday, Mar 19, 2004 at 06:58

Friday, Mar 19, 2004 at 06:58
plug repairs are only a temp repair, over time water will "wick in" on the repair and cause separation within the tyre.

And the truth will set you free....uther
AnswerID: 51010

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