GAS CYLINDER INSTALLATION

Submitted: Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 12:21
ThreadID: 11356 Views:4814 Replies:7 FollowUps:10
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I am happy to report that after searching the web, found out the rules for the installation of gas cylinder on trailers. According to ALPGA they can be installed anywhere on the outside of the trailer, in a well ventilated recessed secure position not protruding past outer allignment of the trailer (eg) drawbar, in front of and behind wheel arch. the facility must not allow fumes to transfer to the inside of the trailer. For further info ALPGA phone number is 93194377, ask to speek to tech section.

Baz.

ps i'm going to have a lie down now my brain hurts.
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Reply By: Arkay - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 12:39

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 12:39
There has been a bit of stuff on the last post on this subject about not having an LPG cylinder inside the cabin of the vehicle.
Guess who is thinking of the thousands of 2 wheel drive and casual campers who go away for the week end with a small gas cylinder in the vehicle (cabin or boot) so they can cook something and heat a kettle on a long week end or on annual school holidays.
How many of those have gone "boom" I wonder? How many havent?
AnswerID: 50842

Follow Up By: Baz (NSW) - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 12:50

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 12:50
When we went on the ferry to Tassie the amount of cylinders they pulled out of vehicle's was amazing, guess know one thinks of the worst.

Baz.
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Follow Up By: flappan - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 13:06

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 13:06
You can transport cylinders in your vehicle.

How can I safely transport my small gas cylinder?

While transporting small gas cylinders is exempt from the provisions of the Dangerous Goods (Road and Rail) Regulations 1998, general duty of care provisions apply to all motorists when transporting these cylinders in their vehicles.

In order to avoid a serious accident or explosion caused by a gas leak from a cylinder in a vehicle, the following should be observed:

never transport/store cylinders in an unventilated vehicle
if the cylinder is transported regularly, keep the cylinder in a purpose built compartment with adequate drainage and ventilation
never attach the cylinder to the external body of a vehicle unless in a purpose built restraint on campervans, mobile homes and caravans, because of the potential risk of damage in a collision
always check for leaks
always ensure adequate cross flow ventilation
keep ignition sources away from the cylinder
secure cylinders and keep them upright
unload the cylinder from the vehicle immediately on reaching your destination, if it is not in a purpose built cabinet.
Ventilation is the key to reducing the risk of fire or explosion.

An article by WorkCover NSW Transporting of Small Gas Cylinders Fact Sheet 2002 is available at Workcover - NSW

Reproduced from Helpline Questions and Answers:

Workplace Issues No. 30 January 2004 edition

From http://www.workcover.tas.gov.au/resource/gascylinders.htm

Also , another here
http://www.workcover.nsw.gov.au/FAQs/WorkplaceHazards/GasCylinders/faq4.htm
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Reply By: Mad Dog Morgan (Geelong) - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 13:42

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 13:42
For years I just did what everyone else did..chuck em in the boot and go but now it's all getting too hard...arrhh my head hurts, think I'll wrap myself up in cotton wool and stay in bed for the rest of my life.
AnswerID: 50857

Follow Up By: Member Colin - NSW Bungendore - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 13:52

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 13:52
It's illegal to wrap yourself in cotton wool ! - well it probably is.

Interesting comment about taking bottles out of cars on the Tassie ferry. On my 2002 trip they checked the expiry date on my bottles in the back of the car but didn't remove them!

and
excuse my ignorance Ray - the flag with a crown - "please explain?"
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Follow Up By: Mad Dog Morgan (Geelong) - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 13:58

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 13:58
You are looking at the Vic state flag Colin.
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Follow Up By: Baz (NSW) - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 14:27

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 14:27
Apparently you cannot carry gas cylinder's onto the ferry in your vehicle or anything flameable, kero and such, you get your cylinder's back, but they keep kero and stuff according to the girl at the terminal that checked our car, unless it is attached to your camper or van but this is what i thought was strange, they put everything they take and put in the back of a ute on the ferry, and when you get to the other end you go to the ute and pick it up. What a bang.

Baz.
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FollowupID: 312618

Follow Up By: flappan - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 15:06

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 15:06
So if your Bottle is on the CT , thats OK ??? , but not in the vehicle.

I though I read somewhere you cant carry bottles with Gas in them , but you can take empties.

ie, fill them up in Tassie . . . ???
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Follow Up By: Baz (NSW) - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 15:33

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 15:33
Jerry can's.

Baz.
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Reply By: marklynn - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 14:12

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 14:12
Just on the subject of gas cylinders....no one would carry disposable cigarette lighters in there vehicle, or use them for lighting gas appliances if they had seen the damage caused when they explode...Have seen photos of hands blown off & legs severely damaged
AnswerID: 50865

Reply By: Arkay - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 16:28

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 16:28
Re. Tassie ferry. CAN'T take empty gas cylinders or fuel Jerry cans. Can only take those items IF THEY HAVE BEEN EMPTIED and FILLED WITH (are full of) WATER - 'Tis true! Been there, done that.
Now about that nice clean diesel fuel from the Jerry can ...........
AnswerID: 50891

Follow Up By: Member Colin - NSW Bungendore - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 22:48

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 22:48
Re Jerry cans - I believe a full Jerry can is safer than an empty one, as it has less gas - which is what catches fire, not the liquid ??

Fill the Jerry with water ? - I hope we have good fuel filters!

As I said before - with all the hassels, we may as well stay home - all the Parks are getting locked up, no gas to cook with and no fuel to go anywhere!
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Reply By: Member - Ruth D (QLD) - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 17:00

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 17:00
Thanks Baz, for doing all the research - bit interested in this. Surprised about the Ferry though. Don't wrap in cotton wool - you will suffocate. Been trying to work out where to put the gas bottle on the new ute. Did anyone work that out please?
AnswerID: 50900

Follow Up By: Baz (NSW) - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 19:23

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 19:23
Guess would be the same as with the trailer, you know, well vented,secure, within confine's of ute. I would say you could'nt much more ventilated than the back of a ute !!

Baz.
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Reply By: cokeaddict - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 17:06

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 17:06
Hey Baz,
Ya did well mate, problem solved. Hope you read the directions before taking those pills. What a pain in da butt that was....glad its over. Until the next exciting episode..here is a word from our sponsor.....

Just for the record Baz,NRMA is cool with bottles mounted on trailer,
they follow same guide lines as you mentioned....."within the outer limits of the trailer and stuff. So if anything happens I'm covered...although i have NO idea how they will see me when im on da moon after a bottle pops, but knowing the NRMA, they probably got road side assistance up there too.
AnswerID: 50903

Follow Up By: Baz (NSW) - Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 19:32

Thursday, Mar 18, 2004 at 19:32
I'm just relieved because of our trailer, with 3 jerry holder's a spare wheel room for motorbike and a stoneguard on the drawbar, where the hell was i going to put the gas bottle holder's,( bike going between stoneguard and spare.)

Baz.
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FollowupID: 312678

Reply By: Topend - Friday, Mar 19, 2004 at 08:24

Friday, Mar 19, 2004 at 08:24
Just thought I would comment on why a gas bottle needs to be upright. The pickup is at the top of the bottle where it picks up gas. If the bottle is on its side it will pick up liquid which when released from the bottle will turn to a gas 800 times. Therefore if a full bottle heats up during the day and needs to vent, you may end up with 800 times more gas if the bottle is on its side compared to if it was upright.

Topend
AnswerID: 51020

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