Suspension help

Submitted: Saturday, Mar 20, 2004 at 14:04
ThreadID: 11409 Views:1214 Replies:5 FollowUps:0
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Hi all! I have a 2003 Mazda Bravo 2.5L TD that is used on a roadside mail delivery contract. It travels approx 1,200 kms each week over mainly gravel and dirt roads. These roads can be quite rough and corruagated at times and i'm finding that with virtually no weight in the back the back end tends to want to move when traveling over these corrugated roads at 110 km per hour. Its quite bad on corrugated corners and i'm concerned that if i let an inexperienced driver do the run for me on odd occasions they could easily get themselves into trouble.

My questions are: I was wondering if changing the shockies to OME or similiar would this help the problem? Would I also need to change the rear leaf springs?
What else apart from adding weight can I do to overcome this? Reducing speed is not really a option because I have a time schedule that requires speeds around 100 km per hour to be maintained.

Any help and advise will be very much appreciated.

Les

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Reply By: navaraman - Saturday, Mar 20, 2004 at 14:43

Saturday, Mar 20, 2004 at 14:43
"Reducing speed is not really a option because I have a time schedule that requires speeds around 100 km per hour to be maintained. "
Firstly I should say that you should drive to the prevailing road conditions not to a time schedule otherwise you're asking for trouble. Whilst replacing shocks and springs can help; any ute with little or no weight in the back will still be a bit hairy on corners. The new suspension would still benefit from some extra weight in the back, Something to do with Newton's Law for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. The new set up can't push the wheels down to give better contact if they've nothing to push against.
AnswerID: 51162

Reply By: Redjack - Saturday, Mar 20, 2004 at 14:55

Saturday, Mar 20, 2004 at 14:55
Assuming your only carrying a partial load, firmer shocks and softer springs would help. Maybe take a leaf out of the spring pack.
AnswerID: 51163

Reply By: Pesty - Saturday, Mar 20, 2004 at 16:00

Saturday, Mar 20, 2004 at 16:00
Les, Try some bags of sand in the back maybe 3 or 4 to give the suspention something to work against, if this is successful then a more permanent load could be added somehow. My brother has 2000 model the same and it is good when loaded for holidays. Its worth a try with very little expence.
AnswerID: 51168

Reply By: Michael_FNQ - Sunday, Mar 21, 2004 at 09:41

Sunday, Mar 21, 2004 at 09:41
Changing the shocks should help, a better shock in the rear will help stop the "rear axle tramping" and reduce the sideways movement. Changing to a OME spring would certaing make a big difference both loaded and empty, better ride & handling.
AnswerID: 51237

Reply By: phil - Monday, Mar 22, 2004 at 09:52

Monday, Mar 22, 2004 at 09:52
I have a 2000 Bravo Cab Plus T/D and also find that the rear suspension is not well controlled.
Mine has a steel tray which adds quite a bit of weight already (2000kg empty compared with about 1750 for a dual cab ute) so extra weight may not help.
I have also been thinking about changing the rear shocks. I think the springs are OK. I would not want any softer.

What fuel consumption do you get?

Phil
AnswerID: 51361

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