98 GU

Submitted: Tuesday, Mar 23, 2004 at 21:41
ThreadID: 11500 Views:1361 Replies:9 FollowUps:2
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Hey Guys,
I am currently looking to upgrade from my MQ SWB to a 98 GU ST. I have found one that has caught my interest, it is an auto and in exceptional condition for the 180,000k's under its belt. My main question is, can anybody give me some pointers on what, if any, wear/troublesome points I need to be looking for in this model.
The vehicle is also dual fuel. 90ltr Gas & Sub tank, can anybody who has this combination or knows of it give me some greatly appreciated feed back on the pro's and con's of this setup if any.

Thanks
Shagga
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Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Mar 23, 2004 at 21:45

Tuesday, Mar 23, 2004 at 21:45
4.5 GU's are very thirsty even on gas.

YMMV
AnswerID: 51660

Reply By: locallaw - Tuesday, Mar 23, 2004 at 21:55

Tuesday, Mar 23, 2004 at 21:55
Gidday,I would if I may suggest buy a 4.2 turbo a far better donk than both the petrol and the 2.8 tdi.

Seeya Martin(locallaw)
AnswerID: 51666

Reply By: Pluto - Tuesday, Mar 23, 2004 at 22:07

Tuesday, Mar 23, 2004 at 22:07
I can't point out anything from direct experience. I bought mine as a 2 year old 2.8. It didn't have any where near the K's you mentioned (it still doesn't).

There is some info ont he subject in Western 4WDriver Magazine, Issue 42. I think 4x4 Australia did a similar article, but I don't know which issue.
AnswerID: 51674

Reply By: Waynepd (NSW) - Tuesday, Mar 23, 2004 at 22:31

Tuesday, Mar 23, 2004 at 22:31
I have the same vintage but in the DX mode.
It is a 4.2l diesel with about 227,000km on it no trouble yet but it is a diesel so it barely run in :)))

....as truckster has pointed out you will be spending a lot of time at the bowser with the petrol model they average about 20l/100km around town i would hate to imagine what they get if towing or even loaded up.
AnswerID: 51684

Reply By: Martyn (WA) - Tuesday, Mar 23, 2004 at 22:35

Tuesday, Mar 23, 2004 at 22:35
Urr Shagga.
There's an article in Overlander Magazine, August 2003 if you can get your hands on it.
Keep the shiny side up

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AnswerID: 51685

Reply By: Member - Toonfish - Tuesday, Mar 23, 2004 at 23:36

Tuesday, Mar 23, 2004 at 23:36
so your selling or trading the MQ?

sounds like a lot of kms on a GU 98 model?

AnswerID: 51699

Follow Up By: Shagga - Thursday, Mar 25, 2004 at 21:36

Thursday, Mar 25, 2004 at 21:36
Thanks for your responses,
Toonfish - I will be selling the MQ, once I have replaced it.

I have had another look at the truck again today and spoken to the previous owner who used it to tow a horse float once a month. She lives in the country and said all her driving was highway however the drivers side springs seemed to have sagged by about 30mm, both front and rear.
Can any one tell me if there is a dual jerry can carrier that will suit a GU on the market that will not interfear with the rear door?
0
FollowupID: 313782

Reply By: flappan - Wednesday, Mar 24, 2004 at 09:12

Wednesday, Mar 24, 2004 at 09:12
What size sub tank ??? The standard 40l ?

The problem with Dual Fuelers , when the replace the main tank , and leave the sub tank , is range. You'll probably get a range of 350k's or so on gas plus 200 odd on the fuel . Total of around 500 or so K's . Not much really.

If they rplace the Sub tank , with the Gas , and leave the main tank , so its basically 90/90 then you get decent range.

I have a 98 Ti 4.5 , that I bought 6mths ago , with 125000 on it. 180 isn't too bad , but depends on where those K's were. On road K's who really cares. Its not as though its a bleep y little 4 cylinder thing. You should get well over 400,000 out of these motors with no probs.

I get around 20/100 City (Canberra) , 15 - 17 Highway , and between 18 - 20 towing my Campertrailer. Bearing in mind it will easily pull away from just about any diesel out there , and maintain the speed limit whilst towing the trailer . . . I'm happy.

Its horses for courses , I DO think the 4.2 is a better vehicle , but I certainly wouldn't discount a Petrol Patrol if the right one comes up.
Oh yeah , of all the vehicles out there , the Petrol Patrol IS ideally suited to dual fuel , so thats not a problem.
AnswerID: 51729

Reply By: roblin - Wednesday, Mar 24, 2004 at 13:37

Wednesday, Mar 24, 2004 at 13:37
Shagga,
I currently have a 98 GU ST with dual fuel but only 147 000klms on it (it goes in 2 days and I get my new TD Prado though!!!)
I bought it with 117000Klms on it and put gas on straight away (the economy factor!)
A few things first. The LPG tank should be a 120litres wet (approx 92litres actual although I have gotten a max of 94litres in before the auto shutoff woked)
The standard dual fuel installation leaves the sub-tank in place (35litres only). The sub-tank only has a low pressure fuel pump as standard fit as all it does is transfer fuel into the main tank for onwards feeding to the injectors. As part of the lpg installation, a mains pressure fuel pump shouald have been installed. This provides sufficient pressure for injector operation and priming. Mine is a VL Commodore item and is installed on the cahssis in the vicinity of the right rear wheel.
Because the GU standard fit has a sub-tank indicator light that shines when the sub-tank is selected. Unless the globe has been removed, the sub-tank light will be on all of the time. This is a wiring loom thing that wasn't part of the mod for lpg
I have the lpg sender unit hooked up to the standard fuel guage as well. Some installations use a guage/switch combination. In this case, the fuel guage will always read zero and, to me, would be of constant annoyance.

On gas the GU gets around 350kms around town and 450kms highway. The sub-tank is good for about 150kms on the highway. Off road I haven't really taken notice. I haven't been far enough away from civilisation with it to care. I just make sure that I have full tanks before I go out and play.
The reason I am getting the Prado though, is to allow me to go wherever I want without constraints due to the lpg or, now, regulra supply of unleaded.
The car is slightly less crisp running on gas but, when the gas is half the price I don't care. Although I haven't had the issue with the GU, my last Commodore (on lpg) required a set of spiral wound ignition leads to ensure a good spark for the gas. lpg is really dependant on good ignition components so, if you have problems, look at plugs and leads first.
As far as the rest goes, the tank hangs lower than the standard fuel tank. I am not a full on serious off roader but haven't had problems with clearance in any of the hill work I have done.
The rest of the problems are standard GU. The suspension can be a bit harsh on a trip (not compared to the old landies though) and the seats can get uncomfortable for you if you're tall (I'm 6'4"). Watch out for the plastic joiner strip between the flares and guards coming out. I have a couple that keep poking out on occasions.
Otherwise, a good vehicle. As already stated, the engine, unlike many others suits lpg quite fine. Technology is old and the motor, in comparison to new petrols, is very sluggish but cruises nicely at 110kph (psrticularly with the cruise set).
If you want more fuel range, there are 70 - 75 litre subtanks available but they cost around $750 plus installation. This will then give you another 200klms range. As one contributor said to me ' that's a lot of jerry cans for 40litres of fuel.
Hope this helps. You won't be disappointed. I also think that 180 000 odd kays is high but they are solid cars and wear well.
Rob
AnswerID: 51751

Reply By: roblin - Wednesday, Mar 24, 2004 at 13:37

Wednesday, Mar 24, 2004 at 13:37
Shagga,
I currently have a 98 GU ST with dual fuel but only 147 000klms on it (it goes in 2 days and I get my new TD Prado though!!!)
I bought it with 117000Klms on it and put gas on straight away (the economy factor!)
A few things first. The LPG tank should be a 120litres wet (approx 92litres actual although I have gotten a max of 94litres in before the auto shutoff woked)
The standard dual fuel installation leaves the sub-tank in place (35litres only). The sub-tank only has a low pressure fuel pump as standard fit as all it does is transfer fuel into the main tank for onwards feeding to the injectors. As part of the lpg installation, a mains pressure fuel pump shouald have been installed. This provides sufficient pressure for injector operation and priming. Mine is a VL Commodore item and is installed on the cahssis in the vicinity of the right rear wheel.
Because the GU standard fit has a sub-tank indicator light that shines when the sub-tank is selected. Unless the globe has been removed, the sub-tank light will be on all of the time. This is a wiring loom thing that wasn't part of the mod for lpg
I have the lpg sender unit hooked up to the standard fuel guage as well. Some installations use a guage/switch combination. In this case, the fuel guage will always read zero and, to me, would be of constant annoyance.

On gas the GU gets around 350kms around town and 450kms highway. The sub-tank is good for about 150kms on the highway. Off road I haven't really taken notice. I haven't been far enough away from civilisation with it to care. I just make sure that I have full tanks before I go out and play.
The reason I am getting the Prado though, is to allow me to go wherever I want without constraints due to the lpg or, now, regulra supply of unleaded.
The car is slightly less crisp running on gas but, when the gas is half the price I don't care. Although I haven't had the issue with the GU, my last Commodore (on lpg) required a set of spiral wound ignition leads to ensure a good spark for the gas. lpg is really dependant on good ignition components so, if you have problems, look at plugs and leads first.
As far as the rest goes, the tank hangs lower than the standard fuel tank. I am not a full on serious off roader but haven't had problems with clearance in any of the hill work I have done.
The rest of the problems are standard GU. The suspension can be a bit harsh on a trip (not compared to the old landies though) and the seats can get uncomfortable for you if you're tall (I'm 6'4"). Watch out for the plastic joiner strip between the flares and guards coming out. I have a couple that keep poking out on occasions.
Otherwise, a good vehicle. As already stated, the engine, unlike many others suits lpg quite fine. Technology is old and the motor, in comparison to new petrols, is very sluggish but cruises nicely at 110kph (psrticularly with the cruise set).
If you want more fuel range, there are 70 - 75 litre subtanks available but they cost around $750 plus installation. This will then give you another 200klms range. As one contributor said to me ' that's a lot of jerry cans for 40litres of fuel.
Hope this helps. You won't be disappointed. I also think that 180 000 odd kays is high but they are solid cars and wear well.
Rob
AnswerID: 51753

Follow Up By: Shagga - Thursday, Mar 25, 2004 at 21:46

Thursday, Mar 25, 2004 at 21:46
Rob,
Thanks for your excellent comments. The sub tank light apparently only opperates when the truck is on petrol and not when on LPG (it wasn't on when I test drove it). At this point I am of two minds as to whether I will buy this one, as the short range could be an issue.
0
FollowupID: 313789

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