Glass Splash Back

Submitted: Saturday, Mar 14, 2015 at 17:09
ThreadID: 117065 Views:1941 Replies:8 FollowUps:16
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My wife and I have ordered an off road caravan with a 6" chassis and independent Cruise Master suspension system, so we can travel corrugated roads without the van falling apart.
We have done a lot of remote off road travel to so we have an understanding of corrugations and the damage they can do to vehicles and trailers/vans.
My wife is thinking of having glass splash back panels fitted to the interior walls, my concern is the vibrations with crack the glass.
Has anyone travelled corrugated roads with splash back panels fitted and if so have they stayed in one piece?

Regards
Peter S
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Reply By: Member - Tony F8 - Saturday, Mar 14, 2015 at 18:02

Saturday, Mar 14, 2015 at 18:02
Shouldn't be to bad if they silicone bed the splashbacks, as long as there is no flex in the caravan frame.
AnswerID: 549968

Reply By: Bigfish - Saturday, Mar 14, 2015 at 18:52

Saturday, Mar 14, 2015 at 18:52
Why not get some stainless steel ones made up? Recently had our kitchen done up and used stainless on the rear of the stove. Looks good, unbreakable, easily cleaned and cant crack.

cheers

Oh yeah...It will probably outlast the van.
AnswerID: 549970

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Mar 14, 2015 at 19:19

Saturday, Mar 14, 2015 at 19:19
I don't understand the logic of deliberately adding that sort of weight.
Might be difficult to calculate or quantify, but you will continue to pay a premium on tyres, suspension, fuel, .... forever.
There are very good reasons to minimise weight at every opportunity.
Add an extra slab instead.............

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome.
AnswerID: 549972

Reply By: vk1dx - Saturday, Mar 14, 2015 at 21:58

Saturday, Mar 14, 2015 at 21:58
Good point made by Peter.

We have a glass splashback in the house and to conform to safety and building requirements it is bloody (!!!) heavy, Ours is 3.5M long, maybe longer than you would want. But two may add up to the same weight as ours.

I both hate it and love it. I see it every morning (I took it 100 kms nth Oodnadatta on the Fink RD) and I always feel it calling us back to those great red dirt/sand remote areas. So if that is your wife's aim then I hope that you get something.

What about a plastic sheet or the like, and a photo or design printed it the and then covered with a clear sealant.

But like I said glass is heavy. I suggest that you try something else.

Facebook - Standout Kitchen in Gilmore
AnswerID: 549978

Reply By: Les - PK Ranger - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 00:51

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 00:51
Standard glass for splashbacks is 6mm toughened, usually clear and painted.
It weighs 15kg / m2.

I wouldn't do it, although toughened with good clearance around and sell and truly neutral cure siliconed on would be pretty resistant to breakage.

Stainless would be a better choice, can be fairly thin and there are many options now for patterns, or if you're really clever, a laser engraved bush scene could be done :)
AnswerID: 549981

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 06:17

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 06:17
Hi Les

Not trying to be smart or anything mate but how would it go with a pot of boiling water next to it for say 10 to 12 minutes? Like when cooking pasta. Ours may be be thicker. Not sure.
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FollowupID: 835383

Follow Up By: Crusier 91 - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 12:19

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 12:19
Glass weight m2 = 2 1/2 x thickness of glass

eg: 5mm thick glass = 12.5kg per square meter
6mm thick glass= 15kg per square meter
and so on.

Installing into a on-road van should not be a problem
I wouldn't install in a off-road van.

I was a glass cutter/glazier in my last life
Cheers
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FollowupID: 835393

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 13:03

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 13:03
Hi Cruiser

What about the heat issue. After all that's why they are placed on the walls behind stoves isn't it.

How would it go with a pot of boiling water next to it?

Phil
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FollowupID: 835396

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 13:16

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 13:16
vk1dx, toughened glass is no problems with temperature differences, why it's used in shower screen panels a lot, it's a grade A safety glass, and it can handle hot water on cold glass fine.

Standard is 6mm toughened, no need to go thicker (except for aesthetics is some extravagant case), and shouldn't be thinner.

The main thing would be to give good tolerences, usually a couple of mm in a home situ, I would give it some more as it will likely be flexing quite a bit more.
Also, toughened flexes very well, the paint should be ok too.

Cruiser, yes, I used to just remember 2.5kg per mm thickness to the m2.
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FollowupID: 835398

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 13:47

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 13:47
Thanks I thought there was a difference - "toughened" to "shower screen" etc.

Ours is secured to the wall with great lumps of some kind of silicone looking based goo.
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FollowupID: 835401

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 13:51

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 13:51
Yes, silicone is industry standard for glass / mirror fixing, particularly neutral cure in a construction grade (Dow Corning is popular).

Other products can possibly damage paints and / or backing layers of vinyl, and especially mirror backings are prone to damage / staining if using acid cure silicone or other type of adhesives for construction (liquid nails, max bond, etc).
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FollowupID: 835402

Follow Up By: Crusier 91 - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 14:14

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 14:14
vk1dx, depending on how old the shower screen is, it maybe laminated (you can tell the difference between plate glass and laminate if you can't see the edge by knocking on the face, laminated will sound dence compared to plate.

Note sure about your shower screen being fixed by silicon alone though, sounds a bit un-desirable to me. Is glass floor to ceiling?
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FollowupID: 835404

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 18:14

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 18:14
The shower screen is fairly new and it was the kitchen splashback that I said was secured by the silicon "goo".

Tnx
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FollowupID: 835420

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 18:25

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 18:25
Phil, yes I thought you meant the splashback was glued in . . . usually, these panels are glued to the wall, little spacers underneath the bottom edge to keep clearance while it dries properly, and removed later.
Then, the whole thing is perimeter sealed to keep moisture out, as liquids from cleaning / spills are nice to keep from getting in there and building up bad bacteria etc.
Usually a coloured silicone is used to compliment the splashback colour and not clash.
It should be done very neatly by an experienced person, using a Windex type spray and what's know as a silicone spatula (or a finger tip :)), there's a bit of a technique experience brings to take excess material off and leave joins very neat.

Most large toughened unframed shower panels are glued into deep channel and silicone (usually translucent) is used for this, and it is very strong and can be done neatly.

I have made a lot of glass furniture in my time using silicone, complete with shelves, drawers, the lot . . . nowadays I make very nice glass display cases using UV curing glue, which is much cleaner and very neat.
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FollowupID: 835422

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 19:08

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 19:08
Check this out: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.693293264055526.1073741827.423036701081185&type=1

I took it at Hamilton Station cattle yards and they printed it on the back of the glass. 20 plus photos merged into one and every colour in the kitchen is in it. Cost a bloody fortune to make sure it was properly sealed and will last.
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 19:31

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 19:31
Exactly what I'm talking about mate, very nice and can bring out a few stories at dinner time with guests I imagine :)
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FollowupID: 835427

Reply By: Rangiephil - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 10:17

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 10:17
Just another couple of things to think about.

When I had glass splashbacks made for my home kitchen the installers told me that for any plug apertures they had to cut the glass then temper it, and they lost a proportion to cracking from the cut holes.
So IMHO don't have any holes cut in it for switches etc or any flex may crack it later.

Also glass splashbacks are painted on the back to get the colour. I would think ANY movement would rub paint off and have it looking really bad.

I personally cannot believe how caravan makers are now fitting stuff that is very appropriate to houses but not vans. A friend has just bought a new van and it has a ceramic basin and toilet. They must weigh a motza.
Regards Philip A
AnswerID: 549994

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 10:36

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 10:36
Good point Peter. Any hole would present a "weak point". And depending on the shape, it can weaken the sheet significantly. No holes is best.

In fact the old Comet plane of BOAC fame (I think) had windows that, due to their shape, developed bad cracks around them resulting in quite a few disasters until they changed the shape of the windows.

Phil
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FollowupID: 835390

Follow Up By: Crusier 91 - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 12:54

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 12:54
All splashbacks should be "toughened". Holes drilled into any glass to be toughened should be a certain distance from edge of glass, this distance depends on thickness of glass.
Under certain circumstances holes need to be closer to the edge of glass for hardware fitting purposes, for eg: heavy frameless shower screens or a glass door, in this case holes are slotted. If not, it wont make it through the furnace.
The weakest point in any toughened glass in its edge, you can belt the surface face of glass with a hammer and it won't break (unless there are impurities in the glass its self or it has not been toughen correctly, there should be a exact amount of shattered glass pieces in a 100mm square, this is called a "dice count")
Paint on a splashback should be painted on the "non-tin side" then heat cured and then have a protective vinyl cover.
Splashbacks or any type of toughened glass do not crack, they explode!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Cheers
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FollowupID: 835394

Follow Up By: Crusier 91 - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 13:01

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 13:01
Just to add, The weakest point in any toughened glass in its edge, you can belt the surface face of glass with a hammer and it won't break, you can tap the edge using minimal force with the same hammer and she will explode.
Most installers use "liquid nails" to stick splashbacks on. Fixing glass with screws is a thing of the past and cost quite a bit more.
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FollowupID: 835395

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 13:26

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 13:26
I used to have a bit of 3mm toughened clear in the retail / trade glass centre I managed for a few years.
3mm toughened was (and still is) rare, this one made by one of our subsidiary companies that made toughened stove top glass.

I'd do a demo with it where I'd whack it hard on the timber entry door frame in the showroom, and I must have done this 100's if not a 1000 times as an effective demo of the toughness of the glass.

Until . . . one day a local priest was in for a talk about a bit of glass to be a wall in a new baptism font, with a large piece of glass in a sunken area so people could see the event underwater.
Well, I told him no probs, we'd be looking at 12mm or maybe 15mm toughened glass for the project.
"Is it strong enough ?" he asked.
Sure, demo went well once, twice, and I gave it a third whack for good luck and sure enough, it broke into tiny particles 8|

Was a good demo of why it is a safety glass anyway, and we glazed his mini indoor pool wall a couple of weeks later.
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FollowupID: 835399

Reply By: Member - Tony (ACT) - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 15:09

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 15:09
Well we have a coloured splash back in our Off Road van and it looks great. Easy to clean and as far as heat from stove not a problem. When burners are in use the top of the stove is open so no heat cannot get to splash back.

It is a acrylic splash back not glass, but looks like glass.

We travelled through western Qld.



including Plenty Hwy with no problems with the splash back.
AnswerID: 550012

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 18:30

Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 at 18:30
Yep, can be done fine, light, strong, easy to work with . . . have also seen beautiful photographs laminated to the back of both acrylic and glass, scenes taken by people on travels etc, some are very spectacular and a real talking piece.

Acrylic is fine, but always have to keep in mind, it scratches finely wiping dust from it (not as much of an issue with vertical panels), and you can't use anything abrasive on it . . . neither cleaners themselves like ajax etc, or cleaning pads like scourers, steel wool, or those white microfibre blocks.
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FollowupID: 835423

Reply By: Member - bungarra (WA) - Monday, Mar 16, 2015 at 10:40

Monday, Mar 16, 2015 at 10:40
We travel in an off road van in severely corrugated conditions a times. We opted for stainless splash back in case of potential breakage but also weight conscious.

As you would be aware a serious off roader is naturally heavier owing to construction hence weight saving where possible is more focused in choosing options

Cheers
Life is a journey, it is not how we fall down, it is how we get up.
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