World's largest asteroid impact zone in central Australia ??

Submitted: Tuesday, Mar 24, 2015 at 08:32
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Researchers have found anomolies which may point to a massive impact zone roughly at the intersection of SA, Qld, and NT.

ABC report here.


J and V
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Reply By: Les - PK Ranger - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2015 at 08:50

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2015 at 08:50
Yes, read a few articles about that yesterday.
2 x 200km diameter 'craters' obviously not visible on the surface, but evidence underground.
You'd think previous seismic testing might have picked something up, maybe they did notice something but it was obviously not oil / gas related.
Cool to think how many times it's been driven over and nobody was aware of this until now.
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Reply By: Member - mike g2 - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2015 at 12:10

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2015 at 12:10
looks interesting, but most impact craters ( eg: wolf creek) I've seen leave a circular or elongated elipse style crater- not seen here?.
MG
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Reply By: Mick O - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2015 at 13:16

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2015 at 13:16
Having been to a few impact sites around Australia, I reckon the most impressive is Gosse’s Bluff. While it resembles an impact crater of itself, it is actually only the central peak of a ‘complex’ crater. The hills are merely what remains of the uplift of material that rebounded as a result of the impact compression.

Here’s what I had written in a blog from our "boys" trip of 2011.

The bluff itself is a circular ring of hills 5km in diameter and 200m high. It was formed about 140 million years ago by the impact of an asteroid or comet believed to be up to 2km in diameter. The hills are part of the crater's central uplift, which formed when the earth's surface recoiled from the impact. A circular drainage system 24km in diameter marks the outer ring of the crater. The bluff is deeply significant to the Western Arrernte people, who own the Tnorala Conservation Reserve that now contains the crater.

The impact is believed to have occurred at the very end of the Jurassic Period at a time when the largest dinosaurs declined in number. This impact alone would not have been large enough to cause mass extinctions on a broad scale, but would certainly have caused a lot of local damage. The remnants of a similar crater originating in the same period can be found in South Africa (Morokweng Crater). At 70km in diameter it was a much larger impact than the Gosses Bluff incident. Either way, this is not a place you would have wanted to be standing when the celestial tour of our cosmic visitor came to an abrupt and fiery end! What we see today are only the worn remains of a crater that was once 5 km deep and certainly surrounded by a rim much higher than stands today.

The Mereenie Loop road and its sights

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Reply By: Life Member-Doug T NSW - Tuesday, Mar 24, 2015 at 20:20

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2015 at 20:20
Impacts are one of my major interests in life, you have stoked my fire and made me sit up and take notice of this thread, Thanks, .

Check out my website on the subject with a full list of Australian Impact sites.


Meteor Impact Sites & Links

Liverpool Meteor Impact Crater, NT

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Follow Up By: Fab72 - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2015 at 17:54

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2015 at 17:54
I can feel a very interesting Sunday History post coming up. (please).

Fab.
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Reply By: Gone Bush (WA) - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2015 at 19:00

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2015 at 19:00
It's a subject I find really interesting.

Even the comparitively tiny Dalgaranga Crater is interesting.

Dalgaranga Crater
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Reply By: Member - John and Val - Wednesday, Mar 25, 2015 at 19:34

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2015 at 19:34
Thank you everyone for your comments. It's quite mind blowing to think that we've been privileged to observe or or even drive over the evidence of world shattering events.

Cheers

John
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Reply By: John B2 - Monday, Mar 30, 2015 at 15:51

Monday, Mar 30, 2015 at 15:51
Very interesting subject I would like to visit this site but at present my wheels are out of action should be back on track later in this year
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