Standard Cigarette Style Plugs and Sockets

Submitted: Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 14:14
ThreadID: 117437 Views:1970 Replies:9 FollowUps:7
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I guess we all know that with use and vibrations many standard style electrical plugs work out of standard cigarette style sockets loosing connection.

I appreciate there are other systems available that effectively lock the plugs in but I am interested if anyone has come up with a means of stopping the standard plugs coming out. For example a rubber O ring around the plug so it is tight in the socket.

As I indicated I am aware of other systems but these are not the topic for discussion - just the standard systems.

Thanks

Garry
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Reply By: Member - santta - Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 14:25

Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 14:25
Just put a dab of silicon along the edge of the plug. That will stop it from coming out. If you have to remove it, you can repeat the process.

AnswerID: 552260

Follow Up By: Louwai - Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 15:05

Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 15:05
Or you could possibly add that dab of silicon & let it dry before inserting the plug. Then it would just tighten the fit rather than sticking the plug in.
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FollowupID: 837833

Reply By: Member - John - Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 16:12

Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 16:12
G'day, I have a mate that uses standard cigarette lighter plugs, but the male ends he uses have a twist device that expands and locks the plug in place. Jaycar have them. He swears by them, me, I use merrit plugs, lol.
12 volt marine plug
John and Jan

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AnswerID: 552262

Follow Up By: Stephen_L - Saturday, Apr 11, 2015 at 18:42

Saturday, Apr 11, 2015 at 18:42
You have to watch this type of plug.
Some of them have a fuse in them, you unscrew the tip to access the fuse (glass type)
This in itself is not the problem however in order to ensure the fuse maintains a good contact they are usually spring loaded, the spring itself is the problem as it is often made of steel and is a coil (as springs tend to be) and can acts as a bit of a resistor. I have had a few, not under particularly heavy loads, get quite hot and have identified the springs as the cause of the problem.

As usual some are made better than others. This Jaycar locking one looks OK.

I fly radio controlled aircraft and have recently started to migrate from methanol/nitro powered models to electric. The currents involved are significant and we use a type of connector called an XT60. It's rated at 60 amps but I regularly exceed that with my lager models (2 meter plus wingspans) and they work great. Very positive lock as they are designed to be used where vibrations are expected.

Cheap as chips about $1 each.
check them out

I have started using them in my car and they work very well, and are cheap as, never come lose and very large contact area.

Only problem is my accessories cant plug into anyone else's car but not a big issue as I have made adaptors for the rare occasion that the need arises.

Cheers
Stephen

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FollowupID: 837849

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Apr 12, 2015 at 09:37

Sunday, Apr 12, 2015 at 09:37
I'm not reffering specifically to Johns one here Stephen and have not tested it.

I always recommend the Lion brand item which has 4 copper plated prongs on it for superior grip , and a flying lead, and unlike some all the prongs make electrical contact.

Why I did this followup was because I nearly had a fire in the car saturday night caused by one of those cheap plugs with a fuse in it, what happened was that a short ocurred right at the entry point between fuse end and centre pin - perhaps because the screw on fitting wasn't fully tight and allowed some play ?

I haven't fully inspected damage yet but it appears that current was not enough to blow any main fuse but enough to melt 10amp wires (perhaps due to stainless steels higher resistance.)

Now I don't use these cheap plugs for above reasons but in this case it was part of a mobile phone charger with that cig lighter type end and fuse.

The above caused a little stir as fumes from melting wire came out of centre console for some time and I was unsure it I had a fire for 2-3 minutes , not a lot of fun in the pitch black bush.





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Follow Up By: Stephen_L - Sunday, Apr 12, 2015 at 10:53

Sunday, Apr 12, 2015 at 10:53
Sounds like you caught it just in time.
There really are some cheap and nasty versions of these plugs around. Sometimes the cheaper sockets can be just as bad.


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FollowupID: 837880

Reply By: Member -Dodger - Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 16:41

Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 16:41
A standard female marine cigar socket has the advantage of one being able to insert a standard male plug and twisting it to effect a lock.
See here


I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.

Cheers Dodg.

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AnswerID: 552263

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Apr 12, 2015 at 07:36

Sunday, Apr 12, 2015 at 07:36
Ditto. Eight sockets in all and the same as yours. We have never had one of these pop out.
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Reply By: BARRY F2 - Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 16:52

Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 16:52
I bought engle plugs with the screw in top ,it works a treat as it dosn't come loose
AnswerID: 552264

Reply By: Batt's - Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 17:32

Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 17:32
I had a double socket mounted vertically in the back of a 60 ser cruise and had the same set up in a GQ patrol and never had trouble with loose connections off road I use to run my fridge off it and a fluro light.
AnswerID: 552267

Reply By: Sigmund - Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 17:54

Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 17:54
Yes, those dual size plugs (Merit/cigar) have limited value in cigar sockets.
AnswerID: 552268

Reply By: bigden - Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 19:29

Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 19:29
i have a standard cigarette style plug in the rear ( it has been rewired with heavy duty cable)
i run my fridge and a few other bits and have never had a problem. its survived the corrogations of cape york and 3 years of general off road stuff

when i first set up the fridge i had intensions of ftting an anderson plug but never got around to it and now i dont think i will upgrade . it never comes loose.
maybe my fridge plug is a tight fit ? but i am happy with how the standard plug works

dennis
AnswerID: 552271

Reply By: garrycol - Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 20:26

Friday, Apr 10, 2015 at 20:26
Thanks for the tips - didn't even think of using silastic - now mentioned seems so obvious - thanks

Garry
AnswerID: 552272

Reply By: Member - Paul B (WA) - Saturday, Apr 11, 2015 at 22:06

Saturday, Apr 11, 2015 at 22:06
I swap them over for 32 volt T-plugs. Never come loose.
Paul B Kalgoorlie

Do your best, have fun & s/he with the most friends wins!

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AnswerID: 552302

Follow Up By: MactrolPod - Sunday, Apr 12, 2015 at 09:20

Sunday, Apr 12, 2015 at 09:20
We put a small cable tie round the cable and fix a small spring with it, the other spring attached to the outlet / mount.
This holds the plug in firm, yet can be removed easily.
Never had an issue in 33 years of using an Engle with a standard plug.
The CSR couldn't dislodge them!
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FollowupID: 837872

Follow Up By: garrycol - Sunday, Apr 12, 2015 at 10:47

Sunday, Apr 12, 2015 at 10:47
Thanks for that option - as I indicated post I am after options for the standard plug socket arrangement not alternatives which others have listed.

Thanks
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FollowupID: 837879

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