76 series Landcruiser

Submitted: Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 19:19
ThreadID: 117563 Views:7495 Replies:10 FollowUps:17
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Hi all

Our very first post here :)

We have just splashes out and bought ourselves a 76 series Lancruiser wagon and we are interested to find out what mods people gave done to theirs.

Thanks in advance everyone!
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Reply By: AlbyNSW - Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 19:53

Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 19:53
Welcome to the site

Lots of mods you can do but it all depends on what you need and what you plan on doing with the new girl. You can easily throw 10's of thousands of $ at them if you want
A three inch exhaust system makes a noticeable difference to both your ears and improved performance
A good set of rubber doesn't hurt either and fuel tank size may be another consideration

There is lots of good info on Lcool or Newlandcruiser. Net worth checking out too
AnswerID: 552730

Follow Up By: Pete & Shez - Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 21:05

Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 21:05
Cheers mate.

Definately looking into an exhaust, got our eye on a 3 inch Manta.

Also looking at the below:

- Overhead console to house UHF
- Custom centre console
- All terrains tyres & CSA rims
- Roof rack
- Awning
- Drawers & fridge slide (currently researching)

Looking to make it an unreal touring vehicle, any tips on specific brands and anything else we've missed woukd be appreciated.

Thanks again
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 20:57

Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 20:57
Good to see you, Pete 'n Shez,

Being a wagon, a bigger fuel tank capacity reduces the reliance on carrying jerrycans inside, or on a roof rack.

Agree with Alby, 3" exhaust is a must, for a couple of reasons.

Cargo barrier would be a sensible addition, and you can stack gear right to the roof in the cargo area. I'd get some bar work too, but some seem to manage without it.

UHF is a must, for lots of reasons. Tinted windows are worth it, to help aircon, and block some rays.

Lot depends on how deep your pockets are. :-)

Bob

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Follow Up By: Pete & Shez - Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 21:09

Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 21:09
G'day Bob

Cheers for that advice mate.

Have noted all of these things down for our wish list.

Now just to chip away at it all one at a time :)

What are you driving?
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 22:23

Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 22:23
No worries. :-)

Have a '02 L/C 79 ute TD. Used to be my work ute, and bought it off the lease company. Can't part with old friends, eh!

Tomorrow I'm going for a drive down the Diamantina, 700 km round trip, in a v8 79 series, big exhaust, lots of lights and bar work. Not mine, just doing a job for a bloke, as he has to go away for a few days.

Have fun with the planning. Just remember, the more "stuff" you add the more fuel it will use.........just a fact of life. :-(

Bob

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Reply By: Kenell - Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 22:25

Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 22:25
Pete & Shez,
I bought mine just over 3 years ago. I have now just started long service leave and I am in the throes of completing my desired mods. I put an overhead console and UHF in early on and also a custom centre console. Dual batteries and Piranha BCDC were essential for my fridge. Recently I had the tinting done. Bullbar and winch were also essential early on together with LED driving lights and good rubber (Mickey Thompson ATZs). I also fitted a Safari snorkel to replace the "elevated air intake" (the original is not a sealed waterproof snorkel). Two weeks ago I had Harrop Eaton lockers installed and in the next few weeks I am having EFS suspension, 3" exhaust, long range tank, fuel pre filter and radiator bash plate fitted. The truck is very capable off the shelf. The interior was sparse though. I love driving it now and I am looking forward to enjoying the new mods. I am sure if you do a bit at a time you will get a great deal of pleasure from your new purchase.
Ken

AnswerID: 552738

Follow Up By: Pete & Shez - Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 22:29

Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 22:29
Cheers Ken

Sounds like an absolute monster. Enjoy your LSL and all your new mods. Cheers again mate and take care.
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Reply By: 671 - Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 22:28

Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 22:28
As Alby said, what do you intend doing with it? That often determines what you do and don't need. After over forty years of roaming around mountains and deserts, I always do as little as possible. I always thought if you have to modify just about everything then you have bought the wrong car.

My current car has an auto locker in the front diff. That prevented loosing the front axle in difficult mountain conditions if a front tyre lost traction or lifted off the ground.

I have done many deep water crossings so a snorkel and high diff and transmission breathers are a must.

There is nothing like mud/rock tyres in the conditions they were designed for and there is nothing like street tyres on the street so I have two sets. I bought a new set of mud/rock and fitted them to the original wheels when I bought the car then bought a new set of street tyres and wheels on ebay. The owner had taken them off his new car and could not wait to get rid of them. The cost was only $325 which I thought was not too bad for five new Bridgestone tyres and new wheels.

I use those street tyres for daily driving and all long sealed road trips but a last minute change of plans one day when I was a long way from home saw me take them over the Oodnadatta Track without any problems.

The mud/rock tyres have worked perfectly on desert sand hills and are excellent in mountains.

I have never owned a bull bar in my life and never will. So far the score is one roo hit in 1972 in the middle of the Nullarbor and nothing since. I always drive to avoid the things and it seems to work.

I have a hand winch but don't take it on every trip.

I have a long handle shovel bolted permanently across the back of the chassis.

The only other things are a UHF and a HF radio. The HF is very handy in the deserts.

The rest of the car is stock standard. I have never had any reason to change anything else.

AnswerID: 552739

Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 08:06

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 08:06
I don't like bull bars or electric winches either, I have a Bogout Cheap, light, small and really works...forward or backward. Beats a hand winch in every way.
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Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 13:12

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 13:12
Michael and 671,

I agree with you on winches and bars. I suspect the additional weight causes more damage than value of having the device. It means I drive cautiously when wildlife is likely to cross my path and I've never needed a winch.

I do like the idea of the Bogout. I searched and couldn't find a reference to it on this site. The Bogout website was quite useful. I just ordered a twin pack!

I reckon it could be linked to a snatch strap to lengthen the distance to an anchor point.

Its an interesting design.

Longer 'rungs' would mean the tow rope would be closer to the centre of the wheel, hence more torque. If you have large diameter, wide tyres the effective length of the rung would be reduced, hence less torque. I can't wait to try them out.

Bob
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 13:35

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 13:35
I had a chat to the inventor at the supershow last week and he was a really nice bloke. I'd already bought mine on line so no sale was involved. He did however give me plenty of tips on how best to use it in different circumstances.

I've been on too many trips with people who have never used their electric winch in anger, got into trouble and tried to get out only to find the winch didn't work for one reason or another. Winching by any means is a pain in the butt, dangerous and should be avoided where possible in my opinion.
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Follow Up By: 671 - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 20:23

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 20:23
Echucan Bob posted: I do like the idea of the Bogout.



I had never heard of them until you mentioned them.

They certainly worked well in that DVD but, like any winch, there must be a suitable anchor point nearby. That is often a major problem, particularly in deserts.

I have had my hand winch for who knows how many years but the only time I have used it on a car was to pull a friend's immobile vintage car up his steep driveway.

It has saved me a lot of work in the bush though by pulling fallen trees off the track. In most cases I would not have been able to do it successfully with a winch mounted permanently on the car. A Bogout would have had no chance.

I have had my car stuck a few times while traveling in a convoy. Recovery has never been a problem then with so many hands available but most of the traveling my wife and I do is solo. The rule then is don't get stuck. By watching the weather, getting local advice before venturing into any potentially difficult or remote areas and walking through some doubtful spots first, we have been able to avoid it.
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Reply By: braggy - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 07:07

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 07:07
We lined the floor and doors with Dynamat insulation in our 76, helps heaps with sound and heat
scanguage is a handy thing to have.
Diff breathers ,gearbox breathers and diff lock breathers cheap and easy to do.
If it is a new one, you will have a 130lt tank , and front and rear diff locks standard

Great wagon you will love it
AnswerID: 552749

Reply By: Member - Serendipity(WA) - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 08:31

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 08:31
Hi Pete & Shez

Welcome to ExOz - this is a great forum website.

A simple and relatively cheap addition is some bonnet struts. I used the same ones as the nissan ute has bought from eBay. Bought the fittings from a trailer shop. I had to move the fuse unit on the drivers side down by about 30mm by adding a custom made bit of bent aluminium bracket.

Cheers

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Follow Up By: Member - Serendipity(WA) - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 08:37

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 08:37
Another cheap one that is helpful. A bonnet scoop guard. You will find lots of leaves, twigs, bugs will enter here often at speed and start denting you inter cooler.

I bought some expanded aluminium mesh from super cheap - the sort that people use to add below their grill line for the look.

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Follow Up By: braggy - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 18:48

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 18:48
Yes, bonnet gas struts,best thing I've done, those bonnets are really heavy.
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Follow Up By: Member - Serendipity(WA) - Wednesday, Apr 22, 2015 at 00:37

Wednesday, Apr 22, 2015 at 00:37
One of the better things if you are towing running heavy loads is to upgrade the brake booster. You can swop out the original for an 80series double diaphram booster and really increase your stopping power.

One of the better upgrades I did.

Look it up on Lcool where I posted all about it.

Cheers

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Reply By: Member - Rosco from way back - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 08:56

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 08:56
G'day P & S

All good sound tips above. One thing I'd suggest is that you don't re-chip it, unless of course you're hell bent on upping the already adequate ante. From my research, the jury's still out on long term impact to re-chipped engines.
AnswerID: 552751

Follow Up By: The Landy - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 16:40

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 16:40
Interesting point.

I have looked into this at various times and remain unconvinced about the longer term benefit. For sure, more power, but at what cost. We tow a TVAN and at times it might be nice to have some more power on the hills, but, in need, I just ease off and change back a gear.

Interestingly, I discussed with my insurance broker recently and they indicated a “performance chip” would need to be referred to the insurance company and additional premiums would be payable, if in fact they agreed to permit it under the policy. I suspect they would, but there is still the warranty issue to work with as well…

Cheers, Baz – The Landy
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 17:02

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 17:02
Yes Baz

In my opinion it's not something you do for the hell of it, unless of course you suffer from testosterone overload. I chipped our previous TD5 as I found the old 2.5 struggled when towing 2 tonnes.

As I'm sure you'd agree from your own experience, you needed to be prepared to keep the revs up and stir the gearbox constantly, which is par for the course with a lot of the smaller capacity engines.
However, I did have reservations and I did subsequently crack a head. Whether that had anything to do with it I don't know, but you have to wonder.

These engines are fairly lazy and under-stressed so why push the envelope. To me it's a bit like dropping an aftermarket turbo on an engine that wasn't designed to cope with the added loads in the first place. They'll get up and bogey, that's for sure ... but for how long???????
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 17:18

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 17:18
I have asked this question before but didn't get a straight answer but are the 70 and 200 series motor internals the same?

When people mention a lazy motor and not to overstress it, I wonder if it is already built to suit the extra power the 200 has and it is more the drive train that will be copping the extra stress?
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 17:36

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 17:36
I don't know either Alby. It wouldn't surprise me if Mr T used heavier internals in the 200.

As an example, many years ago I had a Landy County with the venerable old 3.9 Isuzu which was designated 4BD1.
The turbo version was 4BD1T and had heavier pistons and crank etc, so it certainly wouldn't surprise me if the same applied here as the 200 punches out a swag more power and torque.

I have read the 70 series is limited by the capacity of the drivetrain as you suggest.
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FollowupID: 838452

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 20:07

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 20:07
The Toyota 1HDT and 1HDFTE had, I understand, different heads(have to with the 24 valve engines), stronger conrods with oil sprayers and bit of other stuff the 1HZ could only wish for. Would have been good research for the new v8s no doubt.

Always been a bit reluctant to invest in a chip. Partly because of cost but also the longevity factor.

Bit OT, but was talking to a Cummins Diesel fitter, and asked about upping the horsepower of their truck engines, say from 525 to 600 hp. He said, if under warranty, it costs 2 grand just to plug the laptop in and set the new hp. When out of warranty, cost is a mere $200! Perhaps they may have some reservations upping power, even though they are rated up to 600.

Remapping the ECU might be a safer option to a chip for the Toyotas?

Bob



Bob
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Reply By: Bigfish - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 16:24

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 16:24
Before I spent a cent on any mods I would install a secondary fuel filter. There are plenty of horror stories costing thousands of dollars involving common rail diesel motors. Primary or secondary definitely A MUST HAVE. Also I am unsure but I would be looking at an EGR shutoff. Best to get onto the Landcruiser forum and check out whether an EGR block is a good thing. I know on the prado and pajero its a must have.
AnswerID: 552766

Follow Up By: mountainman - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 21:22

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 21:22
Yes..a second fuel filter... and ruthlessly look through your insurance policy.. making sure your covered for dirty fuel.. some companies wont insure dirty fuel now because of the MASSIVE repair costs... bosses hilux was 4grand in repairs...dirty fuel..
shannons will cover your gear... such as if you took off your tyres to work on your car... next day stolen....stuff like thatbut thats for anything you take off. ..is covered
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FollowupID: 838465

Reply By: The Landy - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 16:49

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 16:49
Hi Pete & Shez

Is it a new GXL, as it comes with some upgraded features?

A great vehicle out of the box, so to speak, without any mods.

I think asking the question the other way around might save you money. What mods don’t I need, versus, what mods should I do?

A mate and I travelled the Anne Beadell Highway and Sandy Blight Track last year. His 76 Series is stock standard, absolutely nothing added to it other than a tyre monitoring kit and it did it easily towing a Track TVAN behind it, perhaps see how yours goes before doing anything.

Enjoy, and importantly, get and use it (I’m sure you will!).

Cheer’s Baz – The Landy
AnswerID: 552769

Reply By: Member - Will 76 Series - Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 19:59

Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 19:59
Pete & Shez,

We have a 76 Series Wagaon and love the beast. I purchased if for its toughness but also to tow a large offroad trailer.
Some mods we have added are:
-Koni shocks - fantastic off the tar but a little hard on the tar;
-ARB Bull Bar & Side rails - recently completed monkey gum trail and the side rails save so much possible scrapes and damage;
-Roof Rack
-Put a chip and 3 inch Taipan exhaust - fantastic and worth it for towing in my view
-180 ltr fuel tank (bushtracker tank steel);
-Cooper AT 3 's but willl upgrade to the Cooper STMax next time as not that happy with the AT 3's
-Roof shelf which is fantastic for storage for driver and passenger stuff
-Uniden UHG upgrading to ICOM or GME next;
-Ricaro Seats x 2 - absolute must as the toyota custom seats are not good
-Outback draw system

She's a touph old rig but we love it and the fuel consumption when towing is better than friends of ours who tow with a dual cab. Great rugged truck - you will love it and as said use it as it is such a capabile vehicle.

AnswerID: 552776

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