Winch ground anchors

To any of you who currently, or in the past, have winches fitted to your vehicles, have you ever used what I have heard referred to as a ground anchor?
That on occasion, useful bit of kit that you hook the other end of your winch cable to when there is no conveniently located tree, rock, other vehicle or whatever, to enable you to pull yourself out of the poo that you find yourself bogged in.
I know personally of one instance where a spare wheel was used for such a purpose.

What I was wondering was, does anyone own, or have had reason to use, one of the commercially available jobbies, or one you knocked up in your shed??

Cheers
Pop
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Reply By: gbc - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 12:56

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 12:56
I've seen port-a-tree's being used in winch competitions, usually the outback challenge in sand because if it's not sand or deep mud they are a bit of a worry. I couldn't imagine carrying one touring though.
Those courses are specifically designed to bog vehicles in strange spots that normal humans wouldn't dream of driving.
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 13:12

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 13:12
I guess that's sort of where I was coming from with this. Now I personally stay well away from mud as much as possible. Hate the stuff, but occasionally I have found that it's a matter of hopefully crossing that little stretch, finding another way, or abandoning the trip all together.
I too have seen demos of these anchor systems but of course the "demonstrators" have a vested interest in showing the successful outcomes.
I have never owned or used one, and of course extra weight and bulk to lug around. The bloke (my son) who was the guy who used his spare wheel, could have saved himself a lot easier if he had had one.

Cheers
Pop
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Reply By: Member - John - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 13:07

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 13:07
G'day, if bogged and no winching point, time to get the shovel out and dig the hole for the spare........ you have one or two, so no need to take another heavy piece of kit, not in a race, so plenty of time, just my opinion
John and Jan

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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 13:25

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 13:25
John,

As per my previous follow up, my young bloke in his youthful exuberance, managed to bog himself below the high water mark in an area famous for it's very high tidal movements. He was solo, but fortunately had a winch. He reckons he could have given an excavator a run for it's money digging holes (twice) to bury the spare ahead of an incoming tide. So in that particular instance, speed was definitely of the essence.
He did learn his lesson however and avoids those sort of situations nowadays...lol.
I do take your point however. Usually, for most situations, speed is not a factor. The only reason I was even considering getting hold of one was that they appear to be a hell of a lot easier to deploy, so to speak, than digging a hole big enough for the spare, and some sort of trench for the cable so it doesn't just pull out of the hole.
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Follow Up By: Member - John - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 14:33

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 14:33
Pop, yep, time was of the essence for your son, would be for us all in that situation.

My Patrol is heavy when touring, so any way I can prevent more weight is used. Cheers.
John and Jan

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Follow Up By: snow - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 20:40

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 20:40
Hehe Pop, I can well imagine!
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 13:45

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 13:45
Back in late '80's and '90's, Pop, company I was working for fitted winches to a couple of Landcruiser Utes. (IPad puts in the capitals, not me! They're "know-all" baskets.). As a consequence, I was regularly bogged!!! You know how it is, "hmm, bit boggy there, eh? Ah, she'll be right, I've got the winch if I get stuck". (Insert here, revving, roaring, of both vehicle and driver, muddy boots, spikey cable and not a tree in sight.......well within reach of the cable). Can empathise with your son.

Never used a spare wheel nor any of the other flash anchors, but regularly used 3 star pickets, driven well in the ground about 50-60 deg angle, and chained top to bottom, with winch cable hooked to first picket, at ground level. Surprised most times how well it worked, except in very sloppy ground. Usually this "structure" was left in situ, as the pickets were driven well down to stop them pulling out.

As a final note. Once they ceased to fit winches, I rarely got bogged. Learned to read the bogs, went another way or just left the vehicle in the shed for a couple of days.

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Louwai - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 15:17

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 15:17
I was going to suggest the same thing.. A few star pickets can be strapped onto the roof-rack somewhere.... Good rope will do the trick for top to bottom if you don't have a couple of short chains.

You'd be amazed at how much load 3 star pickets will take when installed at a good angle & deep enough to suit the ground conditions.

Also, when putting them in, make sure that the "wide side" of the star is facing towards the vehicle. Then you'll get maximum loading onto the ground. Facing the other way & it will be like a shark fin cutting through water....

Cheers, Bryan
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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 14:06

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 14:06
I have one for sale in the classifieds here.
Never been used.
http://www.exploroz.com/Classifieds/Accessories.aspx?id=24028

I have dug a few holes from time to time :)





Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome
AnswerID: 553342

Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 14:15

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 14:15
Star droppers and hand winch.
Patience required...lots of it....



Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome
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Follow Up By: Hoyks - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 14:43

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 14:43
I tried the whole dig a hole and bury the spare trick once. The ground was sandy and it resulted in the tyre and the vehicle moving towards each other. It was less than efficient, but got me the 5 foot so that I could hook two 10m snatch straps, a 20m winch extension strap, tree trunk protector, 5m of drag chain and 10m of wire rope to a tree and pull my Sierra out of a wet sandy creek bed.
Winching with a hand winch and snatch straps is not recommended, they stretch like a rubber band, but it worked.

Star pickets, driven in and wired up in a saw tooth pattern works well though. Pulled a troopie out of a bog using that method. The only tree we could reach started coming out of the ground.
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 15:32

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 15:32
WOW, I didn't realise that particular brand of store bought ground anchor was that expensive. Not saying they don't cost that much, I haven't even priced one yet.
I could knock up one myself, but why go to that trouble if they aren't quite what the advertising claims them to be. Hence my question.

I have heard of people using a number of star pickets hooked together. I was wondering how a standard picket would stand up to having 10,000 lbs applied to the primary dropper. The one the winch line is hooked up to without some sort of additional bracing.
Then of course you need to extract them from whatever depth after use.
I have only personally been in a situation once where some sort of anchor system would have come in very handy. Would have saved me about 4 hours of shovelling and hi lift jacking and packing whatever was handy under the wheels. I remember thinking at the time how appropriate the name "Lake Disappointment" was. About 3" of crust and bottomless chocolate pudding underneath. 2 spare wheels and tyres did see some action as jack bases. My blocks of wood just vanished into the "pudding".
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 15:40

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 15:40
If you do a google search on the ARB anchor, you will find some videos that indicate that they work very well and they are certainly quicker than star droppers which can be hard to retrieve after use.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome
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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 18:09

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 18:09
Someone went to a lot of effort in this one on Lake Dissapointment pop...

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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 18:41

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 18:41
After you pull a couple out of the hole, you learn to bury them deep and to dig the "T" hole.
Especially, as in this example, the winch was a Turfor pulling an F350 and slide-on!





Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome
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Reply By: Troopyman - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 18:29

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 18:29
I have owned a PRT ground anchor for years . It folds up and I always carry it when touring / camping . The original PRT one is rated and stamped at 8000lbs swl . Why not use a home made one or a knock off , because I don't want to hurt or kill myself or anyone else .
AnswerID: 553359

Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 20:04

Tuesday, May 05, 2015 at 20:04
If I am doing a recovery operation, especially if it involves winching, nobody, repeat NOBODY, will be allowed within cooee.
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Reply By: Bush Winches and Anchors - Sunday, May 17, 2015 at 17:16

Sunday, May 17, 2015 at 17:16
The Company Bush Winches and Anchors [url=www.bushwinch.com.au]Bush Winch provide a portable Ground Anchor kit for soft ground recovery situations e.g. sand and mud and a Bridle Kit for creating anchors on hard ground where other natural anchors like trees and rocks, even if not in the right position, can be utilized to create an anchor point.

Anchors need to be portable, easy to position and and just as easy to retrieve and re-use. Burying spare wheels in soft ground is a lot of work and and retrieving star pickets from hard ground is often not possible.
AnswerID: 553888

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