Battery Jump Packs

Submitted: Sunday, Apr 04, 2004 at 18:04
ThreadID: 11820 Views:14949 Replies:6 FollowUps:11
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Just tried out the capabilities of my new 900 amp / 400 cold cranking amp rated jump pack on my 4 cyl diesel hilux . Glad I'm not stuck in the Simpson Desert with a battery which has a collapsed cell and has no life as the battery pack will not kick the vehicle over . This was the primary purpose for purchasing the pack , the sales man was adamant that the 1200amp pack was overkill but I am now wondering what the CCA rating was on a 1200amp pack and would they even jump start a diesel such as mine with a dead flat battery . Any one know about these things ?
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Reply By: ianmc - Sunday, Apr 04, 2004 at 18:16

Sunday, Apr 04, 2004 at 18:16
Hard to know from here whether your pack or the jumper leads & their method of connection may be at fault.
Even when using a second N70 battery with jumpers it seems necessary to give the
clamps a few wriggles to bite the lead posts properly to let the big amps get home.
I had a 600 amp Projecta pack & its was useless for my 2.5td triton but some of the better/bigger ones should be OK
AnswerID: 53163

Follow Up By: kenny - Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 21:09

Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 21:09
ianmc
The pack is a expensive job which has 400amp leads/ surge protection/ four different voltage outputs/ was connected to + post on the battery and to the engine block with the - and wriggled and jiggled quite a bit but I beleive it is a diesel thing as it will spin any petrol engine we have tried it on .
Thanks for the reply
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Reply By: Tim - Sunday, Apr 04, 2004 at 20:27

Sunday, Apr 04, 2004 at 20:27
Yeah I had issues with mine also. Tried to start my TD jackaroo with a 1200CCA power pack and got absolutley no where.
I will admit is was from an cheap auto parts place but it did set me back $160, and before too many arm chair critics jump in and claim it wasn't connected or charged correctly, it was all double and triple checked and in the end it went back to the shop.
Tim
AnswerID: 53181

Follow Up By: kenny - Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 21:15

Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 21:15
Tim
Yeah I think most people are experiencing the same thing with diesels.
I beleive it was connected properly( + to + ) / (- to engine block for earth ) and yes it was fully charged . I keeping mine as it will be good to run the lights off / charge video camera batteries etc etc and I won't be relying on it as a jump starter pack for the vehicle battery . Thanks for the reply
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Reply By: Mick - Sunday, Apr 04, 2004 at 22:18

Sunday, Apr 04, 2004 at 22:18
I've started all manner of vehicles with a Projecta Jump Starter. The big plus for them is the short leads and I've actually used one when jump leads from a car with the engine running failed. Mind you they do have to be connected properly and many people think they know how to do that but don't ensure proper connection - hence the failures.
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Follow Up By: kenny - Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 21:28

Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 21:28
Mick
Thanks for the reply , would you please post a follow up on the correct way to connect them up to see if I am doing it right
Thanks
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Follow Up By: Mick - Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 23:39

Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 23:39
Here we go Kenny! Positive lead to positive on the battery. Negative lead to a good earth (eg Chassis or motor) preferably away from the battery as sparks can cause an explosion if near a battery. I started an Isuzu 4 tonner today with mine. One of the batteries (they run a 24 volt system) was dead and the truck was in a spot which was impossible to reach with normal jump leads. Bingo first go! Make sure there is a good connection between the leads and the battery and chassis. Using normal jump leads I've completed the circuit by connecting the negative lead to a wheel nut as it's right away from the battery. I realise that the leads on the jump start pack are too short for that. By the way, the short leads contribute to their success. The shorter the lead, the better the current flow (less resistance). It's not unlike water flowing through a hose - the longer the hose, the less the flow of water (higher resistance). Cheers!
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Reply By: Macca1 - Sunday, Apr 04, 2004 at 23:46

Sunday, Apr 04, 2004 at 23:46
Kenny,

I had the same problem on my 3.0ltr Turbo Diesel yet it would start my mate's 302V8 without problem. I think the problem is the compression of the diesels. (Please correct me if I'm wrong.)

Mine was a supercheap auto jobby for $89.00 and I wonder what the actual compared to the rated is in CCA.

I think Dual Batteries is my next choice.

Macca
AnswerID: 53199

Follow Up By: kenny - Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 21:20

Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 21:20
Macca
Youv'e hit the nail on the head / dual batteries would be the safest way to go .
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Follow Up By: Mick - Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 23:45

Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 23:45
Macca the usual dual battery system in a 4wd uses a second battery which is a deep cycle battery suitable for running a fridge but not for cranking a motor. The jump start packs have batteries which release a lot of power quickly. Your second battery won't do this - unless you use a cranking battery which in turn is not suitable for running a fridge, lights etc as it doesn't like being flattened.
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FollowupID: 315038

Reply By: Play Rough - Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 03:02

Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 03:02
Just my few cents, I'd check the cable (amount of copper) in the leads. I've found that when i try to jump start large vehicles i need two sets of cheapo jumper leads or a set made out of welding cable and crimped/soldered lugs. The cheap jump leads have 4-6mm of copper to 10mm of plastic to make them look heavy duty. I had a simliar concern with person who wired his electric winch with $10 jumper lead cables in a previous post, your not doing yourself any favours. Voltage drop is the killer in any 12V system.
AnswerID: 53203

Follow Up By: pathfinder - Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 13:17

Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 13:17
totally agree. And this will also be a problem for people trying to jumpstart diesels off another vehicle. The solution is to make your own leads with heavy duty cable and clamps from Jaycar...
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Follow Up By: kenny - Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 21:02

Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 21:02
Playrough
Yeah one of the pluses for buying this pack was that it had short leads and were rated to 400amp and also had voltage spike protection .
I have been caught before trying to start a diesel with cheap jumper leads , I now carry 400amp jumper leads with me and have started 6cyl diesel troopy no worries . Thanks for your reply
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Follow Up By: pathfinder - Tuesday, Apr 06, 2004 at 08:34

Tuesday, Apr 06, 2004 at 08:34
yep, but often supposedly 400amp leads are far from it - thick outer plastic with bugger all wire core...and even if the cable is sufficient, the clamps often are not (had one set of supercheap ones start to arc weld to the battery terminals on me!)

If you want to transfer all 550CCA from one battery to another, make your own jumperleads...
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Reply By: flappan - Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 09:34

Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 09:34
I've had no problems using the cheaper smaller one from Supercheap , on a variety of PETROL vehicles.

Could well be a Diesel issue.
AnswerID: 53214

Follow Up By: Davoe - Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 11:35

Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 11:35
yup I have jump started numerous utes on minesites and if they are stone cold first thing in the morning with a dead flat battery they are difficult to start
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Follow Up By: kenny - Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 21:24

Monday, Apr 05, 2004 at 21:24
Yeah I'm sure it is a diesel issue any way thanks for your replys
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