How do you secure your tarp on your trailer or roof rack?

Submitted: Friday, May 22, 2015 at 15:36
ThreadID: 118942 Views:4757 Replies:16 FollowUps:12
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This not a mate told a mate etc, I heard it first hand.
A lady pulled into the caravan park I was staying in. She was driving a Camry and towing a regular single axle boat trailer carrying a boat of about 14 ft. The boat was covered in a tarp and the rig was tied down with two ratchet straps. In addition the loose ends of the tarp were secured with what I call ‘Telecom’ rope, 6mm rope with two blue and one yellow wrap.
This lady said she was pulled over by an officer of Queensland Transport. He told her that the load was illegal because it was secured with condemned rope. She was given a warning and allowed to proceed.
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Reply By: Flighty ( WA ) - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 16:03

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 16:03
Mikee
It is true, it came into affect in W.A recently.
Ratchet straps are okay, but rope of ANY type is now considered unlawful to secure any load, and that even includes the little tarp you put over your rubbish in the 6x4 trailer when taking it to the dump.
ABC rural had an article on it 18/5/2015 in WA country hour and written by Tara de Landgrafft.
Gives a good explanation of the rules and the crock that we have yet to deal with in the "chain of command" from they who must be obeyed.
Obviously some clown with ties (pardon the pun) with the manufacturers of ratchet straps.
Cheers
Flighty

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Reply By: Notso - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 16:15

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 16:15
I suspect it's more to deal with the knot tying ability of some of the population. My Mrs had to explain how to undo a nut and bolt to a young fella in a shop the other day. He didn't know you needed a spanner on both the nut and bolt head?
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Follow Up By: D-MaxerWA - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 20:10

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 20:10
An axe knot is the most secure
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Reply By: Mikee5 - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 16:31

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 16:31
Queensland Transport website here says 'use rope' in part. The rope on the boat in question was not securing the load, that was done with ratchet straps. The rope in question was basically to control the tarp from flapping.
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Follow Up By: D-MaxerWA - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 20:26

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 20:26
The rope also had to secure the tarp in place, not just to stop it flapping. It could have come adrift into oncoming or following traffic, creating a hazard. If you get a chance to read the rules, you will find that it is madness gone madderer. You can't just chuck a bale of hay on the back of the ute anymore. It has to be secured by an approved tie down or an approved rope. The approved securing mechanism must also be able to keep the load secured in the event of G forces created in a sudden stop. The approved securing device must also only be used by someone trained in the correct procedures to secure said load. If I get a courier to drop something off at my place and he hasn't secured the load properly and causes an accident, I am partly responsible if I didn't check with the courier company to make sure he was trained. The fines are rather large.

I am glad I retired last week, don't have to worry about the ladders on the back of the truck anymore.
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Follow Up By: CSeaJay - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 22:27

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 22:27
Dmaxer
What a croc. Where does one train and get credentials to be 'trained in correct procedures to secure a load with an approved securing device"
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Follow Up By: D-MaxerWA - Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 18:24

Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 18:24
CSeaJay

I am not sure of where, but you should have a read of the rules
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Reply By: Gramps - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 17:12

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 17:12
Just use cheapo zip ties. Don't have to worry about Boy Scout badge for knot tying :)
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Reply By: Alan S (WA) - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 17:31

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 17:31
Mike

With the new requirments rope can still be used but it must be certified for Transport tie downs. Telstra rope doesnt qualify.

I knew this ruling was coming in but i only thought it applied to commercial users, but it looks like it applied to all road users.

But in your example, was the rope actually holding the load or was it just stopping the tarp from flapping. I normally would tie/strap the load, then cover and just run ropes over the tarp and through the eyes just to hold the tarp in place.

If she had just tied the loose ends of the tarp but not tied the load the she was relying on the streght of th etarp to hold the load anyway.

Alan
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Reply By: pop2jocem - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 19:08

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 19:08
Then again I have seen some el cheapo ratchet straps that I wouldn't rely on to hold my hat on.

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: D-MaxerWA - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 20:09

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 20:09
The ratchet strap has to be certified to suit the load you are carrying
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Follow Up By: Zippo - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 20:41

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 20:41
Precious few - if any - of the ones I have seen on sale have any sign of being certified for anything. A manufacturers' self-assigned rating, yes, but that's about as good as a politician's promise.
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Reply By: philw - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 20:42

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 20:42
If you have a decent prang,your load will eject from the roof or trailer,no matter what restraining method used. Let's just ban carrying anything,that requires tying down. Welcome to Australia 2015.
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Follow Up By: D-MaxerWA - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 21:00

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 21:00
philw, you have got the picture. We may as well ban all motorised vehicles as well. Damn them powers that be. Probably still have the same rules for a horse and cart.
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Reply By: Alan S (WA) - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 21:26

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 21:26
While there may be some who see this as another useless regulation, it has only come about because of real life Accidents. How would yo u like it if you were faced with a poorly restrained load coming straight at you.

Years ago on a bend in the road here in the perth hills, a corner that since claimed 3 lives in another accident, a truck carrying new creosoted sleepers lost its load, virtuallyr shooting sleepers accross the road in front of coming traffic. No one in that instance was kill.
but these laws are meant to protect us intelligint people from those trying out for the darwin award, so in my view I support them.
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Follow Up By: D-MaxerWA - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 22:18

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 22:18
I agree with you there Alan S, Max Trenordens wife would probably still be alive today if the load had been properly secured. However, you need to read the new regulations to understand why they are so completely over the top. This is worksafe gone mad. I often work on minesites, so I know about safety.

Everyone should read the new regulations before commenting on this topic. They are draconian.
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Follow Up By: Member - johnat - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 22:23

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 22:23
Look at the numbers, and this is knee-jerk at its finest!
How many accidents of this type have actually occurred causing any injury at all?
Then look at the number of millions of vehicle km traveled and tell me that there's any more than a miniscule risk of this type of accident causing an injury.

Oh, and intelligent people, Alan, recognise that the people injured in such accidents were not "trying for a darwin award" but were innocent victims.

"Years ago", a load came adrift on a curve and caused no deaths - irrelevant. The same corner claimed 3 lives in an unspecified type of accident - irrelevant.
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Follow Up By: Alan S (WA) - Friday, May 22, 2015 at 23:36

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 23:36
John at
Not the victims trying for darwin awards, but those tying stuff on with scant regard for the implications.

As for irrelevant, maybe , maybe not, but remember most people impacted by unsecured loads are innocent.

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Follow Up By: Ron N - Monday, May 25, 2015 at 01:21

Monday, May 25, 2015 at 01:21
I for one, am thoroughly sick of unsecured loads creating havoc on our roads when they fall off.
The new regulations are merely Govt knee-jerk reaction to regular instances of unsecured/improperly secured loads coming adrift and causing accidents.
If people took more care and exercised some skills and intelligence, the harsher attitudes from authorities would not have been brought into regular use.

Just on regular jaunts around W.A., I have come across the following on the highways ...

Star pickets
Gluts from truck trays
Sheet of steel
Tradies equipment and tools
Paint
Oil and oil drums
Bales of hay
Chunks of timber
Large bolts and chunks of steel
An entire spare wheel carrier frame from a truck or semi-trailer
And I've even seen an ENTIRE HOUSE dropped onto the centre median strip of the Roe Hwy - when the inadequate chains holding it snapped, and the house slid straight off the low-loader, and landed on the median strip as the truck rounded the corner from the Gt Eastern Hwy bypass road ...

On the Mitchell Freeway about 18 mths ago, a motorcyclist was killed when a tradie lost a poorly-secured wheelbarrow from his ute.
Quite a number of years ago, a bus driver was killed instantly just East of Merredin when a loader bucket fell off an East-West semi as he was passing it on a curve (truck going the opposite direction).
The bus driver collected the loader bucket smack-on in the face. It was a miracle no bus passengers were injured, it could have been another Grafton.

I have no problem with transport officers and police being harsh on improperly secured, or poorly-secured, or insecure loads.
AFAIC, all drivers should be made to pass load-tying practical and knowledge tests if they want to drive a ute or a commercial vehicle, or tow a trailer.

The old days of, "She'll be right", should be put well behind us. It's all about taking responsibility for your actions, that potentially endanger other road users.

Cheers, Ron.
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Reply By: MP - Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 10:12

Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 10:12
Excellent topic and another law that appears to differ from state to state and territories. It would be great to hear from somebody that could clear things up, because from what I could find on SA Govt websites(without wasting too much time) the majority of technical information applies to Heavy Vehicles over 4500kg GVM. This would be to cover the transport industry, but there is little information re light vehicles. From what I could find it covers load limits, load projections, when to flag a rear projecting load and that the load must be appropriately secured. It does not specify what type of tie down must be used let alone a rating, other than it must not make the vehicle unstable, the load must be unlikely to fall or to be dislodged from the vehicle and an appropriate method be used to secure the load. I hope someone can supply more information as there are many of us out here that would benefit.

Cheers

Mark
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Reply By: Neil & Pauline - Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 12:21

Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 12:21
this is the link that gives all the info you need, maybe

http://www.ntc.gov.au/Media/Reports/(E62BE286-4870-ED95-1914-1A70F3250782).pdf


Neil
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Reply By: rocco2010 - Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 12:41

Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 12:41
Gidday

Interesting references to knot tying.

My grandfather trained under sail in the RAN 100 years ago and he passed on his skills with knots to my father and uncle.

The things those men could do with a piece of rope to secure loads were amazing.

Sadly my father was not able to pass on his knowledge to me. I just couldn't get a handle on it.

ratchet straps are my saviour

Cheers

AnswerID: 554126

Follow Up By: Member - Blue M - Monday, May 25, 2015 at 01:13

Monday, May 25, 2015 at 01:13
When I was a young fella I lived across the road from a Western Transport Depot in St. George and watched the trucks come in and load wool onto semi trailers to go to the East. All tied down with hemp type ropes using a Sheepshank knot. (there may be other names for this knot)
After a good many years they changed to nylon type ropes. Many a time did I see the guys land on their ass when pulling them down tight.
The slippery rope will not hold a knot as firm as hemp rope would.

Ratchet straps are all the go now as they as so much easier to use.

Cheers
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Reply By: Robyn R4 - Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 12:59

Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 12:59
Thanks for this.
We're off to the Kimberley in less than a week and I'll be double-checking with hubby before he heads to Bunnings (or wherever!) for the last time before we go.
Ropes always make me nervous anyway...I personally never trust them, no matter how good the person is tying them. They just don't seem secure enough for my liking, and the implications of the lost load can be pretty awful (eg the ladder the unknown tradie lost off his ute on the highway near the Gold Coast about 12 years ago and the resulting fatality when it hit the following car...)
:)
AnswerID: 554127

Reply By: Bigfish - Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 17:12

Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 17:12
Supercheap has rolls of duct tape on special $1.00 each. 14 meter rolls..

There is nothing duct tape can,t handle.......

Now I have to figure out what I am going to do with 2 new rolls of Telstra rope....
AnswerID: 554136

Reply By: Bazooka - Sunday, May 24, 2015 at 15:34

Sunday, May 24, 2015 at 15:34
A quick google shows that this rumour has been around a while. Just read a comment regarding chain of responsibility legislation which suggests rated rope should preferably be used but there was nothing definitive that I could find.

http://latus.edu.au/load-restraint-rope/

From WA : https://www.mainroads.wa.gov.au/UsingRoads/HeavyVehicles/Compliance/Pages/CoR.aspx

Qld: http://www.tmr.qld.gov.au/Safety/Vehicle-standards-and-modifications/Loads-and-towing/Load-restraint.aspx

http://www.logan.qld.gov.au/environment-water-and-waste/waste-and-recycling/load-restraint
AnswerID: 554170

Reply By: charles D2 - Sunday, May 24, 2015 at 22:25

Sunday, May 24, 2015 at 22:25
My two cents worth, any load can be dangerous, here in Perth a few years back, sitting at a traffic light i saw a truck loaded with pipe pull off and one pipe slipped out and went through the windscreen of the car behind, no one was hurt, the load was secured by chain locked down, accidents do happen,
The issue is do you make another law, NO. Publicise the dangers and then let informed adults choose to take a risk and face the consequences. Personally since i saw that accident i will never ride behind a truck, car or any other vehicle that i view as a risk. We have too many laws as it is, people stop thinking for themselves.
We need guidance not laws but then i suppose where would the Law Inforcement get there funding. Just my opinion.
Charlie
AnswerID: 554178

Reply By: Shaker - Monday, May 25, 2015 at 15:55

Monday, May 25, 2015 at 15:55
I have been led to believe that Telsta use the rope as a mouse for pulling cables through conduit & only allow it to be used once, after that is is condemned.
Maybe that was part of the reason.
AnswerID: 554209

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