Anyone just brought an orange snatch strap

The Tigerz11 snatch strap is not up to the job and is dangerous. It has been recalled.



http://m.recalls.gov.au/content/index.phtml/itemId/1072257
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Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 10:05

Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 10:05
Unsealed 4X4 has tested snatch straps. Tigerz 11 Hercules failed miserably. The article is here.

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AnswerID: 554633

Reply By: Member - mike g2 - Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 10:44

Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 10:44
Thanks Chris, 4x4 article a good read. I'm amazed. well done to them for this timely formal test. Very useful to remind us all that wet strap can be weaker. Goes to show.. who would be responsible for a serious incident? would it be like the numberplate- gate ... responsible authority ? retailer ? manufacturer?
? sue a ( 4x4 course) training organisation.
a recovery bystander came too close- strap broke...Try proving it wasn't your ( owner/driver) fault under duty of care.

I can just see it.. "user untrained or trained poorly or didn't use it properly /correctly or according to instruction" ( good one for a QC in court) .
I have seen other cases of products being sold here that fail our safety tests.

how far do you go now- test shockies, Tow bars +ball? , electrical eqpt?, emergency eqpt... your car/van/trailer/RV/tent/boat....
personally I am beginning to think quality control is beginning to suffer in this country.
MG.
AnswerID: 554635

Reply By: Sigmund - Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 10:47

Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 10:47
And to add, Robert Pepper* reckons that snatch straps loose their elasticity after maybe 5 uses and should be replaced.

* http://www.exploroz.com/Shop/BoilingBilly+4WD_Handbook.aspx?s=the%204WD%20handbook


AnswerID: 554636

Follow Up By: Crusier 91 - Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 17:22

Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 17:22
Yes it is true. Though our ARB straps are rated for 8 uses before they goes in the bin. We write the date of each use on the strap.

And

My recovery gear use is last resort for anyone bogged other than my self, it's not cheap to replace.
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FollowupID: 840760

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 15:46

Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 15:46
I don't agree with how they interpret their results. Sure enough a few straps were duds (and that is worth knowing) but nobody ever died from a broken snatch strap.

What many people have died from during snatch recovery is a big lump of metal on the end of a loaded intact strap. That is usually a shackle or a broken recovery point, or a towbar that has rusted or the recovery point bolts have rusted etc

So when they praise a 8000kg strap for breaking at 10,000kg, I think they get it wrong. An 8000kg strap should break at around 8000kg.
AnswerID: 554644

Follow Up By: Bigfish - Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 15:53

Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 15:53
I think you will find that they rate the 8000kg strap as a minimum it should break at. If it breaks over..that's a bonus. Same as most other things that are rated. Fishing line is another example (IGFA rated anyway). Quality ones are rated at a minimum figure. I for one would be very happy to know that my 8000kg strap broke at 10,000kg. I will never be able to tell the difference when I am using it and the extra breaking weight will allow me some leeway with my strap being used a couple of times, being wet, age and how much wear from fine sand and dust in the fibres.. Of course they can guarantee but if it breaks at 7000kg you probably wont know. Get it tested later and the manufacturer can just say that is weakened by the last pull on it..Also saves buying a 10,000kg strap..
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FollowupID: 840756

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 16:28

Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 16:28
It is fine for lifting equipment to be over-rated, but not snatch straps. Bigger is not better.
If everyone went out and bought 12000kg straps we'd have a lot more broken recovery points, which is what kills people.
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FollowupID: 840758

Follow Up By: Idler Chris - Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 17:54

Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 17:54
I can see where Phil G is coming from and an under performing snatch strap is not going to kill you and in the hands of the many inexperienced it could well save lives. However there are many very experienced readers here who travel to the most remote places where if you cannot get yourself out you don't get out. If you a far from anywhere and using a bridle with two properly engineered recovery points, cable dampers and safety ropes tied to the shackles and lots of spade work you don't want your strap to break, you need to get out, your life may depend on it. These tests are good as the experienced know what they are getting. The inexperienced do not tend to read these reviews and buy on price and if they get an under performing strap that, it could be argued, is a good thing.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 19:57

Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 19:57
I take a harder line than what Chris has suggested.

Here is the law as it pertains to snatch straps.

It's pretty straightforward.

The minimum breaking strength must be specified. Breaking at a lesser value is non-compliant. Hence the recall.

Manufacturers are required to provide instruction on how to use and maintain the straps. It is up to the user to read, understand and comply with those instructions. Just as drivers are required to read, understand and comply with road rules. I see absolutely no difference.

You buy a complying strap, you get the instructions.

Any accident resulting from misuse or operation contrary to the instructions puts the onus onto the user, as it should, just as it does the driver in regard to road rules.

Anything more than that and we're heading into nanny-state territory, and god knows we have enough of that already.

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Follow Up By: Bigfish - Sunday, Jun 07, 2015 at 09:23

Sunday, Jun 07, 2015 at 09:23
The other issue is rated recovery points. The devices themselves are rated. How they are attached to the vehicle then means their rating is irrelevant as it is how well the attachment is that determines their breaking point. Two large mild steel bolts will last no where as long as 2 high tensile correctly sized bolts. Same as welding . Professional welding job compared to backyard builder SHOULD see the attachment perform to its rated ability. Give ma strap that breaks at 10,000kg over one that brakes at 7000kg any day..I paid for a strap that was guaranteed to break at or above 80000kg and that is what I expect.

Very good test from the magazine ...Should save a lot of people from making a poor purchase..
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FollowupID: 840774

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Jun 07, 2015 at 09:49

Sunday, Jun 07, 2015 at 09:49
Bigfish, agree with a lot but not all of what you say. Yes, the Australian Standard that came into being in 2010 after 2 deaths and one serious injury in Qld, states as you say that an 8000kg rated strap should break at no less than 8000kg.
And you importantly point out that the recovery point and its method of attachment to the chassis is important (in my opinion its the most important part of teh whole thing).

Now a story from ARB. ARB have been making snatch straps for a long time (I bought my first snatch strap in 1987, and I reckon they started them a couple of years later). ARB have never sold recovery points until 2 years ago. Years ago, we were told by people behind the counter to attach them to the eyes that were built into the uprights of their bullbars. Then there were instances of those eyes pulling out and shackles going through people's vehicles. So ARB made covers so that the eyes were no longer seen and rebuilt their bullbars without that eye. Then if you went into the shop and asked where to attach the strap, you were told they don't sell recovery points, you'll need to buy them elsewhere.

Eventually ARB bit the bullet and recently came out with recovery points for a few vehicles. I bought a pair for the 200series after they were released last year.
200series GVM is 3350kg. Straps should be 2-3 times GVM - so 6700kg to 10,000kg for the 200.

ARB warn against using straps stronger than 8000kg with their recovery points even though they have the highest rating on the market. The reason being that you never want the strap to be stronger than what is required to shear the 2 high tensile bolts (supplied), otherwise the recovery point and shackle might become a missile. Here is the sticker that must be fitted adjacent to the 200series recovery point:
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FollowupID: 840775

Follow Up By: jdpatrol - Sunday, Jun 07, 2015 at 21:22

Sunday, Jun 07, 2015 at 21:22
Phil, I had the same reaction. You are spot on. Pretty basic stuff really. Cheers
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FollowupID: 840792

Follow Up By: gbc - Tuesday, Jun 09, 2015 at 06:14

Tuesday, Jun 09, 2015 at 06:14
those round eyes in the old ARB bars were to take a high lift Jack adapter made by them. Whoever told you to snatch off them should be taken out and shot.
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FollowupID: 840837

Reply By: 322 - Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 18:23

Saturday, Jun 06, 2015 at 18:23
I've had a look at several Tigers11 products including their roof racks. I think it is mostly cheap rubbish. After seeing their roof rack on a blokes car I bought a Tracklander.
AnswerID: 554649

Reply By: Winner W - Sunday, Jun 07, 2015 at 11:30

Sunday, Jun 07, 2015 at 11:30
All this talk is driving me snatching mad . Why snatch when most of the time you can pull a vehicle out without ripping the guts out of both cars.
AnswerID: 554664

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Jun 07, 2015 at 18:18

Sunday, Jun 07, 2015 at 18:18
Absolutely! Get the shovel out and turn it into an easy tow or a do a light snatch. Personally that is all I ever do. But I'm older now, and don't go looking for mud and sand. And I now have the benefit of experience.

But when most of us were young and inexperienced, we used to enjoy driving in mudholes and down on the beach. And the budget could easily stretch to a snatch strap and a couple of shackles .....after all that is what gets promoted and sold in the thousands. And who reads instructions and warnings??

Then you go to a place like Canunda or Little Dip or the Coorong or Goolwa Beach and get yourself stuck in the shellgrit with an incoming tide, and panic sets in.
......or play in the mud within cooee of Melbourne and get stuck in a mudhole where all the warriors with 35's just made it through, but you bottom out and get the strap out. And you have to be back at work tomorrow...

I see a lot more younger people getting into 4wding. They do it without formal training, and learn off one another - can be hit and miss - sometimes you are taught well, sometimes you are taught bad, sometimes you make it up as you go.

I think we need to make people aware of what can go wrong and how to prevent it. No point in any of us berating someone because the towball broke - that towball that killed someone had 3500kg written on it - surely it would be strong enough!!! But as a few of us now know it can shear off at the end of a snatch strap.
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FollowupID: 840786

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