ANOTHER!!! Swag question........

Submitted: Monday, Apr 12, 2004 at 19:19
ThreadID: 11983 Views:6559 Replies:8 FollowUps:13
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Okay, thanks to all who replied to my earlier post on sleeping bags in swags, I think I too will abandon the bag & go with sheets & doona.

Okay........next dumb question..........here we go.......

My swag has a full screen & a top cover & head cover ( windows ). In summer I generally leave the top cover open all of the time. I have just returned from Venus Bay and it drizzled for 3 nights, I had the top cover zipped closed, and the end cover ( wall of head ) open. I hadbleeploads of condensation in the swag each morning, plus a headache. Seems to me that I had not enough fresh air, although the end cover is probably around 0.25 square metres in surface area.

What do you guys do when it is drizzling, or the threat of a little light rain?

I carry a small microfast MI4 tent & some tarps, but I don't want to be messing around putting all of these things up each night unless absolutely neccesary.

I must be doing something horribly wrong, surely.

Are we supposed to sleep in the swag with the large canvas top closed?

By the way, the swag is a Sar Major Discovery, but a heap of swags seem to have the same detail.

Cheers

Ian BEE
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Reply By: GO_OFFROAD - Monday, Apr 12, 2004 at 20:18

Monday, Apr 12, 2004 at 20:18
We are just selling our double swag, to go to a microfast MI4-5 or similar, very easy to put up/down, and the wife wants something she can sit up in bed in under cover.

The double swag also takes up some room in the car, compared to packing seperately, and if it isnt raining dont even need the fly on the microfast tent.
AnswerID: 53953

Reply By: johnsie - Monday, Apr 12, 2004 at 21:31

Monday, Apr 12, 2004 at 21:31
Tie a tarp to the top of the bar and tuck it under the swag at the bottom and 2 pegs to spread the sides.
AnswerID: 53963

Reply By: Member - Gajm (VIC) - Monday, Apr 12, 2004 at 23:59

Monday, Apr 12, 2004 at 23:59
If I am on my own and its likely to rain I usualy set the swag up on the roof rack, and have made a couple of poles that slip into the ends of the rack in some brackets i made that are permantly bolted on, then i have a centre pole between those, and put a tarp over that with some cheap spring type clamps holding the edges onto the sides of the roofrack, makes a nice tent shape and has been great in very very wet weather.

If I have my son with me with his swag we use the same tarp and clips onto the side of the rack, and down to the ground as previously mentioned in the above post, we also have shade cloth under each swag, helps keep them a little cleaner.
AnswerID: 53982

Reply By: Dave from Fraser Coast 4WD Club - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 06:29

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 06:29
Have you ever treated w your swag with some kind of waterproofing agent??

I spend 100+ nights in my swag each year and have never gotten wet, not have I ever had a problem with condensation.

It has a window that is the full tall end of the swag and another (that you can't close) at the feet.

In cold weather I've slept with the hole thing clsed up, except for th small window at the feet, without any trouble.

My point is that I have never used a waterproofing agent on the canvas, these stop water, sure, but also prevent the swag from breathing, hence the condensation buildup.
AnswerID: 53986

Follow Up By: Eric from Cape York Connections - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 12:43

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 12:43
Dave I also spend a lot of time in a swag the wife is hinting I should spend more not sure what she means.
I have found up north and west in the desert were theres not much condensation or rain I dont have the problem and the night time temps are higher.
But one night down south around eden the night was very clear and about 0 degreeze and a heavy due I was all zipped up and nearly drowned in side even with rear window down a bit.
As sated above If rain is a problem I rig a tarp of the side of the truck
that slots in some sail trak and it works a treat.

All the best
Eric
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Follow Up By: Leroy - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 17:51

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 17:51
I didn't quite drown Sunday night but I reckon it got down close to 0 deg in the Vic high country. I was all zipped up and had the flap near my head open. When I got up there was a fair amount of condensation on the inside and also it was very dewy on the outside. But the guys in the tent also had the same problem.

Leroy
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Reply By: Diesel 1 - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 08:08

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 08:08
You are doing something horribly wrong Ian - you are not using the grey matter between your ears. It doesn't take much effort to rig a tarp over your swag to keep the moisture out and if you view this as 'messing around', you deserve to get wet.

Diesel 1
AnswerID: 53995

Follow Up By: Ian Bee - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 18:57

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 18:57
Fair call!!

Over at Venus bay, I had set my swag up under a verandah, kept my top cover closed, but head flap open, and had heaps of moisture inside. Must have been a high humidity content.

Cheers

Ian BEE
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Follow Up By: Ian Bee - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 18:57

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 18:57
Fair call!!

Over at Venus bay, I had set my swag up under a verandah, kept my top cover closed, but head flap open, and had heaps of moisture inside. Must have been a high humidity content.

Cheers

Ian BEE
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Reply By: GO_OFFROAD - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 11:30

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 11:30
We have a tarp and 2 poles which go onto car, and can be 3 ft high at other end, 6 ft high, or pegged to ground so side angle section gives cover for wind coming in sideways, or rain.

We also use it for shade during the day if required.

[ View Image]
AnswerID: 54007

Follow Up By: Roachie - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 11:54

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 11:54
Gee the sunraysia's look good on the Patrol, don't they? I might ditch my standard Patrol wheels and replace (one day.LOL)
Cheers,
Roachie
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Follow Up By: GO_OFFROAD - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 12:02

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 12:02
You better go wash your mouth out with soap after calling a toyota a nissan roachie..... and if you cant even tell what type of car it is, how can we trust your judgement on the looks of anything???? let alone hijacking the thread as well....

But steel wheels are more panel beatable,[fixed 2 bent ones already] and the secondairs are easier to drill and fit into cheaper steel rims, the rims are offset out 40mm per side further than the standard wheels to allow for the 80mm lift, and the white powder coat is easy to fix, over the factory $1100 a piece alloy wheels, which i sold, along with the standard tyres, and got 10 steel rims, secondairs, and a set of 285/7516 MTRS, a much better bush combination.
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Follow Up By: Roachie - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 12:19

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 12:19
Sh*t, Sh*t!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I am so sorry for insulting your vehicle mate; LOL.

Honestly though, I've just had another look at the photo and, to me with my decripit eye-sight, it looks like a Nissan front end and the snorkel on the left side threw me too. With the tarp hiding the rest of the vehicle, I can't be blamed too much; can I?????

Cheers mate,

Roachie
PS my apologies for highjakking the the thread too.....I think I need a pill and good lie down.
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Follow Up By: Pesty - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 12:21

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 12:21
Yeh Roachie, why not ditch the whole Patrol, then wash your mouth out twice, and buy a Toyota so you can be assured of returning from cape york! LOL

Cheers Steve
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Follow Up By: GO_OFFROAD - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 12:22

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 12:22
8-))))))))))))))))))))

Nissan do do a good half baked attempt at copying anything they think may help......8-)
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Follow Up By: Member -Bob & Lex (Sydney) - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 17:52

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 17:52
Looks like a GU front to me to Roachie
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Follow Up By: GO_OFFROAD - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 17:57

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 17:57
Heres hoping you guys are never witnesses to something important................
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Follow Up By: GO_OFFROAD - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 17:57

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 17:57
Heres hoping you guys are never witnesses to something important................
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Reply By: Pesty - Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 12:28

Tuesday, Apr 13, 2004 at 12:28
Ian
We were camped at coffins bay over easter and condensation inside our oztent was dripping on our bed, and even in the caravans only not so bad.
It was the weather that was at fault and even if you spent 15 min. setting up a cover, you would still have gotten wet in those conditions.

Cheers Steve
AnswerID: 54009

Reply By: D-Jack - Wednesday, Apr 14, 2004 at 17:01

Wednesday, Apr 14, 2004 at 17:01
Hello Ian

I haven't read the rest of the replies but here is my response, after just going through all the same thought processes it seems you have.

Swags don't breathe like most inners of tents. They are waterproof because they absorb water, the water expands the fibres of the materials and tightens, hence no more water can enter and it runs off.

Likewise, if it is a moistish night outside (as is usual in SA during the cooler and cold months) then the canvas will still absorb moisture from outside. Then, as is when it is raining or dewy, the water can not get in as well, but also the moisture and heat inside can not get out. Hence you get saturated. You can have windows in the sides, but unless there is a constant breeze flowing thought the swag the moisture from your body and already within the swag will evaporate, rise and make you very very wet.

Don't get me wrong, I love my swag, but in my older (I'm 31 now!) and wiser age I have come to see the benefits of small tents. You can get them for about $40 on. Even though the tent may collect condensation inside (and they are less likely to) it doesn't really matter because it's not against you or your sleeping gear. Being nylon or poly it dries very quickly, especially in the sun. If you get a good design (i don't know anything about the one you are looking at ) then you can have windows all round and even on top without the fly on nice evenings, and still clearly see the stars and feel like you are sleeping out.

If you are going to start putting up tarps and stuff, you may as well just put up a small tent (mine takes me about 3 minutes all up) and enjoy. Also is somewhere to shelter if it is raining.

Mind you, many of the swags these days with flexible poles and ropes are just small canvas tents anyway - some of them take as long to put up as a small simple tent.

Also think of the space the swags take up. A mate and me recently went on a 6 day camping and fishing trip, covering about 2600 kms. I had to have my roof racks on to accommodate the swags. I would estimate the extra wind resistance cost me an extra $60-$80 in fuel. My little tent fits into less than the size of a compact sleeping bag, then you nust need your sleeping bag and a self-inflating mattress (mine is $50 from K-mart, had it for 5 years now and no problems, very comfy).

Just some food for thought for you Ian.

Regards

D-Jack
AnswerID: 54197

Follow Up By: Ian Bee - Wednesday, Apr 14, 2004 at 20:54

Wednesday, Apr 14, 2004 at 20:54
Thank You......

It's all too easy too think you are doing something wrong, until you find out that it happens to everyone else!

Yeah......... Iv'e got a Microfast tent ( Mi4 ), but I like the speed of unrolling the swag.
Sometimes I don't get to site until 2100 hours....... set my stove up & cook a quick feed, unroll swag......3 Bourbon's & Coke.......you know the rest.........

Anyway, it would appear to me that unless it is quite warm outside, I would be advised to have my top cover open at all times, and simply park my swag undewr my 4 x 4 awning.

Cheers

Ian BEE
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