Transit of Venus

Submitted: Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 08:22
ThreadID: 12311 Views:1538 Replies:5 FollowUps:12
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For those that are interested, an occurrence called the transit of Venus will happen on June 8th. What this means, is that Venus wiil be visible as a black dot against the sun. The transit will commence at approximately 2.00pm CST and it will be visible for a few hours. The last time this happened was December 6th, 1882, so it is a rare occurrence.

WARNING: To safely view the transit, use either specialist solar lenses or a welding lens - nothing less than a #14. You can also use a simple pinhole projector to view the image - check: http://solar-center.stanford.edu/observe/ for details.

Diesel 1

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Reply By: cokeaddict - Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 10:06

Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 10:06
Hi Diesel
Where abouts are you located mate?
Im asuming that CST stands for Central Standard Time?
Interested to check that 1 out for myself...thanks for the info
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Follow Up By: Greg (rag) - Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 13:20

Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 13:20
Hey cokeaddict,
Still waiting for you to e-mail me some details on the cooling system modifications (since 14 April). Or was that just crap so you could post something.
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Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 14:38

Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 14:38
Now That was silly Greg.
Buggered if I will be passing them onto you after that stupid remark. I have already passed them on to some members, just for the record.
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Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 14:50

Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 14:50
Actually GREG, I still have your request in my email box ( Post ID 12018)and it was replied to on the 15th April @ 10:48AM, Maybe if you would know your own email addy u wouldnt have said something so stupid. I am glad it didnt arrive now. Get off ur butt and make the effort for yourself u lunatic. Go and spent 4 diesel tanks @ 140 ltrs a time and 5 weekends and see how your results end upfor yourself.

Apoligies to the real people out there for my outburst. Usually I'd ignore such childish behaviour. To those of you that have a copy of my mods, id apreciate it if you didnt pass them onto this kid.
Regards Angelo
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Follow Up By: Greg (rag) - Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 15:07

Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 15:07
Now that WAS silly ANGELO,
Stupid, Lunatic Childish,Kid, all in one follow up.

Pity you couldn't have put so much thought into typing an email address
CORRECTLY then maybe you wouldn't be so hot and bothered now....

Regards
Greg
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Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 16:52

Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 16:52
I cant do better than copy and paste your email addy as it was written. If something went wrong, I sure didnt receive an error.
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Follow Up By: Diesel 1 - Saturday, Apr 24, 2004 at 07:56

Saturday, Apr 24, 2004 at 07:56
G'day cokeaddict,

I'm up in Darwin mate and you are correct, CST is central standard time.

Diesel 1
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Reply By: Bonz (Vic) - Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 12:00

Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 12:00
Yer Diesel Wherabouts is the best Viewing place
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Follow Up By: Diesel 1 - Saturday, Apr 24, 2004 at 08:02

Saturday, Apr 24, 2004 at 08:02
G'day Bonz,

The transit can be viewed from anywhere in the country, but like most astronomical events, the clearer the sky the better the show. It would be best to get away from the coast and seek a patch of good clean air somewhere.

Diesel 1
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Follow Up By: Diesel 1 - Saturday, Apr 24, 2004 at 08:51

Saturday, Apr 24, 2004 at 08:51
I was a bit incorrect there Bonz - a partial transit can be viewed from anywhere in the country, but as pointed out by Mike, you would have to be somewhere on the west coast to witness the entire transit.

Diesel 1
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Saturday, Apr 24, 2004 at 09:09

Saturday, Apr 24, 2004 at 09:09
Thanx Diesel. I looked at the info and theres times for the east coast also, i will be looking.

Regards Bonz
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Reply By: Member - Mike H (VIC) - Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 15:06

Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 15:06
G'day.
I was going to run a tour for that event but now can't fit it in due to other commitments.
The best place to view the Transit of Venus would be somewhere around Broome (easy access ).
Actually, I think Steep Point would be magic.
Somewhere in the Simpson or maybe at Chambers Pillar would also be ok, although there the sun sets much earlier and disappears below the horizon before the transit is complete.

Take a look at those two web sites:
Transit of Venus

A NASA Site

As Diesel mentioned eye protection is essential.
I got cheap plastic viewing glasses for the 2002 Eclipse from here:
Starfield Scientific & Photographis Services,
Starfield

Enjoy,
Mike
AnswerID: 55655

Reply By: Davoe - Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 15:54

Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 15:54
I observed a solar eclipse by pointing a small telescope at thesun and projecting the image onto a wooden board (doesnt burn a hole like you might think) can i observe the transit like this? and will the transit be visible from kalgoorlie?
AnswerID: 55661

Follow Up By: Member - Mike H (VIC) - Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 18:10

Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 18:10
Hi Davoe,
considering that venus appears only as a small speck, moving across the sun, I don't think that method would work.
It will certainly be visible from Kalgoorlie, starting around about 1pm and finishing after sunset. Sunset.
Try playing around with the Applet: "Venus Transit Observer" on that Venus Transit web site.
Either input the Kalgoorlie Latitude & Longitude, or click onto the map at the approx. location of Kalgoorlie. Then select June 8th 2004. Then you just click onto the button marked "Watch 2004 Transit"
Next you just keep changing the "Local Time" and you'll get a representation of where Venus is at that time. You can keep changing the time and see the progress.
In Kalgoorlie the transit happens from approx.13:15 to approx 17:00 when the sun sets.
Hope this helps, Mike

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Follow Up By: Keith Scott - Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 23:55

Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 23:55
Davoe - indeed you can observe like this. When Mercury last transitted the sun I got out my 7x35 binoculars and used them in a similar way to how you describe.
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Follow Up By: Diesel 1 - Saturday, Apr 24, 2004 at 08:12

Saturday, Apr 24, 2004 at 08:12
G'day Davoe,

As you can well appreciate, directing the sun's image through binoculars or telescopes generates high degrees of temperature and even though this will not adversely affect most instruments, it could very well have a disastrous outcome for instruments with multi layered lenses - the heat crazes the bonding adhesive.

Diesel 1
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Reply By: Member Colin - NSW Bungendore - Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 21:17

Friday, Apr 23, 2004 at 21:17
The transit is one of the reasons we are off to the Calvert Ra in early June - we normally would do this trip in July.
No one alive has seen this event (the first since May 1882), so this might be exciting! Before that it was Captain Cook in the Endeavour, specifically chasing the Transit of Venus in 1769. So we probably owe our existence to the 1769 transit in some small way!

To look at the Eclipse of the sun in Dec 2002 (I think it was 2002?) we travelled to Lake Gairdner, SA (with 100's of others!) - we used a set of binoculars mounted on a tripod, and projected the image onto a piece of white card - the image was about 10cm and was quite sharp - easier than looking through special glasses.
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