GPS re-radiating antenna

Submitted: Saturday, Jun 08, 2002 at 00:00
ThreadID: 1271 Views:2342 Replies:4 FollowUps:3
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Is there a simple way to make a re-radiating antenna for a GPS unit which has an internal aerial. Magellan sell one for about $150 but I don't feel inclined to spend that sort of money if I can make one from a few bits of wire. Operating a GPS with internal aerial in a car results in lots of signal drop outs.
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Reply By: Darian - Saturday, Jun 08, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, Jun 08, 2002 at 00:00
Rob ....had a quick look on the Magellan site....the re-rad looks like a transceiver to me - runs on 12 volts - can't see you doing that with a few bits of wire. I'm lucky with my Lowrance unit - runs very well on the dash (hard on the A pillar) with inbuilt antenna (except for deep/high country). If the re-rad works well, the $150 has to be worth it for mine.
How about you ask Magellan for personal contact with a user ?
.....dp
AnswerID: 4085

Reply By: Bill - Saturday, Jun 08, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, Jun 08, 2002 at 00:00
Rob, I have a Garmin which has the facility to use an external antenna. I mount mine on the top of the dash and never have any problems - position is all important so before you try making an antenna or spend all that money ... try to get it mounted where it has a good look at the sky!!
AnswerID: 4092

Reply By: Peter - Sunday, Jun 09, 2002 at 00:00

Sunday, Jun 09, 2002 at 00:00
Rob I too have a Garmin, well two actually an old GPS75 single channel/multiplexed unit and a GPS12XL.
The 75 will work ok outside but in the car definitely needs the external antenna while the 12XL works ok but for steep heavily treed country an external antenna is better.
You may find that your gps will work ok up on top of the dash but loses signal when heading south (as the satellites are in an equatorial orbit) and an external antenna is required to overcome it.
If your gps cannot accept an external antenna then as you say a re-radiating antenna/trannsmitter is the only solution apart from upgrading your gps to a different model.
The best place to ask the question would be at www.gpsoz.com.au as Brian is very familiar with what is available.

Peter
AnswerID: 4096

Follow Up By: Greg Harewood - Tuesday, Jun 11, 2002 at 00:00

Tuesday, Jun 11, 2002 at 00:00
Peter - you said "(as the satellites are in an equatorial orbit)"
Are you sure this is true? Please elaborate/clarify.
Cheers Greg
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FollowupID: 1773

Follow Up By: Peter - Tuesday, Jun 11, 2002 at 00:00

Tuesday, Jun 11, 2002 at 00:00
I was actually trying to explain what the orbit was, it isn't actually an equatorial but they all rotate more around the centre of the earth more than the top and bottom. Does that make it any clearer?
If you have alook at the Garmin site it explains it better.
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FollowupID: 1774

Follow Up By: Greg Harewood - Thursday, Jun 13, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Jun 13, 2002 at 00:00
No worries Pete - got the picture. Cheers Greg
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FollowupID: 1793

Reply By: Rob - Monday, Jun 10, 2002 at 00:00

Monday, Jun 10, 2002 at 00:00
Thanks for the feedback guys. I have just returned from a trip North of Perth with my GPS sitting on the dash and I couldn't believe the number of satellites that I was receiving. Obviously a lot of my problems are coming from trips through the southern forests where I am encountering too many trees.
I will be checking out www.gpsoz.com.au and then working out a way to
either make one or just bite the bullet and buy one.
Cheers
AnswerID: 4120

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