Cobb Cooker Enquiry

Submitted: Monday, May 10, 2004 at 16:50
ThreadID: 12753 Views:1978 Replies:3 FollowUps:4
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Hi folks ...
Seems everytime I do a major trip I get caught up in total fire bans. It happened to me again while staying at Wilpena Pound last month. No camp fires, no gas stoves .. nada ,, nothing .. zilch!!!! Not even a ciggie in the open.

Can anyone advise as to whether the Cobb Cooker will get me around this "total fire ban" problem? I understand that I can stick the lid on it once the beads start going, but would the start up (using firestarters???) contravene these bans?

Living on the Central Coast (NSW) and having seen what the poor firies go though in bushfire times I am certainly happy to observe such bans .. but I also choose not to starve to death. Salad???? Feed it to the rabbits.

Thanks in advance.

Jack
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

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Reply By: Willem - Monday, May 10, 2004 at 18:20

Monday, May 10, 2004 at 18:20
Jack you were given the wrong information as you are allowed to use gas stoves under certain conditions on Total Fire Ban Days.

Go to http://www.uppersturtcfs.org.au/regs.htm and read.

If all else fails then you could always wrap your tucker up in foil, place it strategically in the engine compartment and go for a drive. It heats or cooks depending on the duration of the drive.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Jack - Monday, May 10, 2004 at 19:54

Monday, May 10, 2004 at 19:54
The information came from the Ragner, whose job it was to enforce such a ban. I went in to pick up a map when I noticed the sign, enquired if it applied to gas, and he said it was a "absolute" ban - no naked flames, including ciggies.

I could understand it, as the place had just come out of the total fire ban season and it was permissable to have camp fires, but 3 days into it, because of whatever winds were blowing, all finres were banned.

I had a similar experience last year in the Warrumbungles, and when I asked about gas, the lady there showed me the fax from the fire authorities which said it was an absolute Fire Ban - nothing at all unless you could cook it in your tent or caravan. Again that included smoking out of doors. Both conditions were extreme I have to admit, and understandable.

Just thought with the Cobb - no naked flame - heat beads - it may be different. Then I remembered how they are lit, and thought I would ask the question.

Thanks
Jack
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

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Follow Up By: ToyMotor - Monday, May 10, 2004 at 21:53

Monday, May 10, 2004 at 21:53
I had the same experience last year at Innes National Park - not even allowed to have a gas stove on the beach between low and high water mark! (Which was a real pain as we'd just caught some nice crays...) According to the ranger, inside Nat Parks the council rules do not apply.

Cheers
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Reply By: Ian Bee - Monday, May 10, 2004 at 19:17

Monday, May 10, 2004 at 19:17
Been there, done that.......... at the end of the day, a fire ban is a fire ban....... live with it.
Total Fire ban means NO FIRES........ again........NO FIRES.

If it is a National Park, they have a solid fuel fire ban, only gas stoves allowed......... nothing else.......gas cant leak and spill and setbleepon fire like glowing embers from heat beads and dual fuel stoves......... simple.

I only just managed to escape a fine myself for the same thing down at Deep Creek, the Ranger must have been in a good mood.

Gas in summer............ Cobb & Dual Fuel & fires in winter.

Cheers

Ian BEE
AnswerID: 58035

Follow Up By: Member - Jack - Monday, May 10, 2004 at 19:58

Monday, May 10, 2004 at 19:58
The bans in the Flinders applied also to gas stoves .. guess that means dual fuel as well.

At the Warrumbungles they told me the only way I could cook (unless I had a caravan) was to use the electric bbq's further down the road, which we ended up using. Hard to boil a jug on, though.
ended up asking someone in a caravan for a jug of hot water. Gotta love those caravans at times.

Thanks
Jack
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

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Reply By: Moose - Tuesday, May 11, 2004 at 13:09

Tuesday, May 11, 2004 at 13:09
How do you light the damn thing without a naked flame? Answer is obvious - you would contravene the absolute fire ban as soon as a naked flame appears.
AnswerID: 58145

Follow Up By: Member - Jack - Tuesday, May 11, 2004 at 13:16

Tuesday, May 11, 2004 at 13:16
Not if you light it in your tent ... van .. or whatever. My query is more to the viability of the heat beads which do not give off a flame, nor, as far as I have noticed, any sparks. Not an experienced user of heat beads I must admit.

Their main concern is the sparks that fly around, which is understandable.

On both occasions, the folks enforcing the ban have said no NAKED flame .... which covers camp fires and gas stoves, and the lighting of the heat beads in the open using firestarters.

Jack
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

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