Any Dual Battery System deals on?

Submitted: Wednesday, Sep 09, 2015 at 20:39
ThreadID: 130248 Views:1566 Replies:5 FollowUps:18
This Thread has been Archived
Are there any deals or recommendations for a dual battery system for my Prado. I'm not looking for anything too fancy, just for lighting and occasional phone charging?
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Tim F3 - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 07:59

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 07:59
Have a look at thread 130201 for a recent discussion, and ABR ( advertiser on this site) offers good service and good prices on the gear you may want.
AnswerID: 590204

Follow Up By: Tim F3 - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 08:01

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 08:01
Forgot to mention ABR have their own prado that they have set up as you suggest.
0
FollowupID: 858202

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 09:50

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 09:50
Is it ABR or ARB!!! Chuckle.

Seems to me that the keyboard made a few mistakes . . maybe.

Phil
0
FollowupID: 858204

Follow Up By: Sigmund - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 10:49

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 10:49
ABR Sidewinder. Have a website and an eBay shop.

I can recommend them. Good gear and support.
0
FollowupID: 858213

Reply By: HKB Electronics - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 09:49

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 09:49
I would suggest you visit Prado Point, plenty of threads their on different setup for the Prado

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 590209

Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 09:55

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 09:55
I should have mentioned, it is not so much the dual battery system you need to research, it is inner guard cracking. Inner guards cracks are a well know issue with the Prado that Toyota refuses acknowledge, you need to be very careful of how you mount the auxiliary battery though you may still have issues with both cranking battery and auxiliary batteries with regards to guard cracking if your going to do a lot of roads with server corrugations.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 858205

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 10:07

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 10:07
Good point ,ate.

We actually have an extra plate welded to the side where our third battery (yes third) is mounted back to the rear of the main battery, near the firewall with the fuel filter and Redarc isolator mounted on the side of the box that came from ARB. Excellent job with the welding and pain ting and is not really noticeable.

Phil

0
FollowupID: 858206

Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 10:20

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 10:20
Problem with mine is the cranking battery, aux is in a proper battery tray and no issues with it.

Guard has cracked on the cranking battery side in two places, behind the battery and in front of it, haven't taken out the battery yet to see if the area under the battery is cracked. This is in a 2008 Prado, with around 30000Km's on the clock, yes that is correct only 30000Kms and only around 2000kms or less done on heavy corrugations!

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 858207

Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 10:25

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 10:25
Should also mention, car was not overloaded, tyres were deflated to as low as 20 PSI to allow for the corrugations, couldn't have gone lower if I wanted due to sand slippage generating tyre heat. Hope the Hilux is as unbreakable as Toyota advertise because the Prado sure isn't!

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 858208

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 10:40

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 10:40
That's a bit of a pain. Was there a modification that you missed?

Luckily the 4WD shop that does work on our car knows what they are doing.

We have not touched the original battery mounting at all. Just isolated the drivers side one and wired the new one (third battery) in parallel with it but still isolated fully from the main system. And installed the fuse box that I mentioned. I hate messy and hard to problem solve work. Hate it like a pub without beer.

And a Redarc 200amp isolator is wired "between" between these two "banks" that allows all three to be used for cranking or winching.

We also see a local autoelectrician for wiring advice and mostly use them.

Phil


0
FollowupID: 858211

Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 11:03

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 11:03
No cracking before recent trip evident, two identical Prado's on the trip, my unit towing a Vista other towing a TVAN. Both vehicles fitted with the same after market suspension setup, other car running BFG's and my unit running coopers. Other car was probably a tad heavier. Both cars have virtually same accessories installed including Toyota alloy bars, only difference with mine is I have a winch fitted to the bull bar. Other Prado was running slightly higher cold tyre pressures. Both vehicles did exactly the same trip, in convoy so more or less same speeds, my car started cracking around half way through the trip other Prado has no cracking evident. Other Prado has around 120000 on the clock so the suspension may be a bit softer due to wear but it has also covered a lot more corrugated roads. Some crack others don't, another with cracking I know of also has a winch fitted but have have read of others in stock standard form, never been of bitumen also with cracking. Have read of mine vehicles with huge cracks in firewalls and guards across there fleets. So cross your fingers and toes and hope it doesn't happen to yours!


Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 858214

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 11:24

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 11:24
That is a pain. Luck of the draw - I reckon!!!.

Even on the same road the driver can make a difference. Some people have a natural tendency to be gentle or easier on the car. Even though it's hard to avoid it with some tracks that we go on. For example, my wife is heaps gentler on the car than I. Yes I admit that some would say she is a better driver. Well, she was an Australian champ and is a life member of a national car club, so I would expect it to be so.

I wouldn't go any further than to say that's bad luck and get it fixed as you apparently have. Just the luck of the drawer mate.

We don't have a prado but we do have a heavy car. Used to tow but won't again. Too restrictive in many places. But we have upgraded the car with suspension mods and some air bags at the rear, to give us a bigger GVM (3700 Kg), and have it approved on the rego. The air bags are NOT there for lift. Just stability. You just take so much extra stuff when you travel solo. And don't forget the second fridge as a freezer for the ice blocks in the deserts!! I love doing that with the temp at 40 plus and the tourists getting out of the hot bus next to us. You can just "see" the words "can I have one?". Love it!!

Phil
0
FollowupID: 858215

Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 11:45

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 11:45
Yes, ice cream in dessert is a luxury I also wouldn't be without, bottom line in my case though was car was simply driven on outback roads, car was not abused just simply couldn't handle what it should be able to do without an issue. If you look at the metal Toyota have used it is paper thin, you can bend it with your fingers, no wonder it fatigues and cracks.

In my KIA sportage the metal in the same area would be 10 times thicker than the Prado and the KIA has the same ladder chassis setup.

Anyway this is getting a bit far off topic so will let it go there.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 858216

Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 11:48

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 11:48
Forgot to add, vehicle has not been repaired as my vehicle servicer (non Toyota) have told me they have never seen one that has been successfully repaired and has not cracked again.

When I get time will be taking vehicle to Toyota for them to look at and when they refuse to repair it will be off to consumer protection it seems

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 858217

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 12:08

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 12:08
I tried to be generic and not accuse anyone of abusing a car. Just saying that some are gentler than others.

Best of luck with the warranty claim.

The metal will be as thick as is necessary to satisfy engineering standards and as thin and possible to make an extra quid for the shareholders. A fact of the capitalist society that we belong to.

I am way OT, so will leave it at that. Catchya

Phil
0
FollowupID: 858218

Reply By: vk1dx - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 10:01

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 10:01
As Tim said have a look at thread 130201. Also check out thread 130165.

Without complicating things and a litte advice for problem solving should anything go wrong, install a sepatate fuse box for things wired directly to the second battery. Not expensive and still simple enough for even Goofy to understand.

Having inline fuses without any label or identification on them is stupid. Keep it simple though.

Fridge, driving lights, USB and camp stuff all goes to this fuse box. Got it at Jaycar and max all ccts is 100 amp with max per cct of 30 amp and of course you can use a fuse (even 10 amp) as required. A led lights up if the fuse is blown. Now that I do like. Even the dash cam, CB and in-dash navigation box (GPS stuff) goes through it.

Phil


AnswerID: 590211

Follow Up By: Outbackogre - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 12:40

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 12:40
Phil, sorry to be a bit OT, but what size fuse do you use for the fridge? I'd love to do a tidy up of under bonnet electrics with something like your fuse box. I currently have separate auto reset circuit breakers for my fridge and rear Anderson plug. Thanks, Rob.
0
FollowupID: 858220

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 13:28

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 13:28
Hi Rob

The circuit to the rear of the cabin is a capable of 40 amps, but is fused at 30 amps. Each fridge is fused independently with an internal thermal fuse in it's cigarette lighter style posi-fit plug. I don't know the values. Both cables and plugs are as purchased with the fridges. I always carry a spare cable so don't need to worry about this thermal fuse. I will just swap cables if there is an issue. No problems so far!

This circuit also powers a couple of lights in the annex to our roof top tent that extends over the rear door and out the rear of the car.

Phil

0
FollowupID: 858222

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 13:35

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 13:35
I meant to add;

I am not in favour of resetable circuit breakers I would rather fix the fault and use a fuse. If a fuse blows there is a problem and it should be attended to. Otherwise things may get worse and you could end up with a fire etc etc.

Just like a tooth ache. A pain killer tablet wont fix the tooth which will only get worse and maybe even poisonous.

Phil
0
FollowupID: 858223

Follow Up By: Outbackogre - Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 13:51

Thursday, Sep 10, 2015 at 13:51
Thanks Phil. I take your point about the dangers of autoreset circuit breakers, and it would be a nice solution to use that sort of fuse box for the whole job. Cheers.
1
FollowupID: 858224

Reply By: Batt's - Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 14:22

Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 14:22
Why go dual battery if it's only for low current draw items you could use a dual purpose battery like a supercharge allrounder and fit a couple of outlets with an inline fuse that run directly off the battery it would be a lot cheaper. I ran my 47 ltr evakool fridge/freezer and led lights off a single battery for 4 yrs never had a problem just be aware of how much current your items draw. I used a 105ah supercharge allrounder which lasted just over 5 yrs.
AnswerID: 590387

Reply By: Capt. Wrongway - Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 16:09

Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 16:09
Regarding cracking guards .... I don't know if it's just 'luck of the draw?"

I currently own a 2014 Patrol but prior to that I owned two 120 Prados, both from new. A 2003 and a 2009 both V6's, fitted with all conceivable accessories. There was a lot of weight in both of them. I travelled everywhere in them, over some of the worst corrugations you could imagine. Neither one of them suffered cracked guards. The only thing that was different from most other fitted-out Prados was that I kept the aluminium bull bar and mounted a winch cradle behind it. That saved a substantial amount of weight over the front end compared to a full steel bar. Maybe that helped, who knows?

In both Prados I fitted a simple Redarc VSR between the starting battery & accessory battery. Kept both batteries going for 5 years, my ownership of both vehicles.

Capt.
AnswerID: 590390

Follow Up By: 515 - Thursday, Sep 17, 2015 at 10:38

Thursday, Sep 17, 2015 at 10:38
Also not sure about "luck of the Draw"!!

But I've had 2 Prados, 1 V6 and the last one a D4D Diesel. Petrol had no bull bar but an ARB dual battery system...no cracks...2nd one Diesel had ARB steel bar ARB battery tray...no cracks!! And both did more than 300k each, both on and off road, and lots of long corrugated roads included.

Cheers
515

0
FollowupID: 858446

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)