jacks

Submitted: Friday, Oct 09, 2015 at 20:02
ThreadID: 130555 Views:2475 Replies:9 FollowUps:2
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have a px twin cab ranger,standard suspension but a lift coming up soon,not enthralled by the scissor lift jack,for changing wheels,trying to not use a hilift or a inflateable bag,any other suggestions would be appreciated,thanks for future answers bye barry
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Friday, Oct 09, 2015 at 20:13

Friday, Oct 09, 2015 at 20:13
Some years back, Barry, I wanted a 2nd jack for my Landcruiser ute. Not a real fan of the supplied Jack.

Bought a 4tonne hydraulic jack from Supercheap, that has been okay, and is not really overloaded jacking up one wheel on a loaded ute.

If money is no object, I'd get a good quality stumpy, that will give you years of good service.

Bob

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AnswerID: 591410

Reply By: disco driver - Friday, Oct 09, 2015 at 20:23

Friday, Oct 09, 2015 at 20:23
You could try a hydraulic one with multiple stages (2 or 3 sections that all extend). Wont be cheap but should last for a lifetime with careful use.

Alternatively, there are some trolley jacks that have a good lift and also reasonably thin when released. (will fit under axles when tyre is flat)
However with trolley jacks you will need a base plate somewhat bigger that the jack as they tend to roll forward as they lift.
Trolley jacks are unfortunately heavy and take up a bit of space but reasonably safe on slopes etc provided the usual safety precautions are used.

If space/weight is at a premium, go for a good hydraulic over a trolley.

Dsico.
AnswerID: 591411

Reply By: Nomadic Navara - Friday, Oct 09, 2015 at 22:01

Friday, Oct 09, 2015 at 22:01
I like the idea of mechanical ones. Have a look at the top two. The red one was the jack supplied with my E20 back in the 70s. It worked well. I see it is still going strong.


PeterD
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AnswerID: 591417

Reply By: Member - Blue M - Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 at 01:54

Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 at 01:54
Barry, the last jack I bought was a 20 ton hydrolic one with the screw section for the first lift. To make sure it did what I wanted, I deflated my back tyre in the car park. Told the guy inside I need a jack, and carried three out there to test, and bought the one that worked. I have bought a few in my time and the one that fits under usually won't lift high enough, and the one that lifts high enough won't fit under the spring. The 20 ton one I got had the biggest foot print and was the easiest to jack up. To change the front wheel is another story, still need a squat one to get started, than the bigger one.

Cheers
AnswerID: 591423

Reply By: Member - John - Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 at 07:23

Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 at 07:23
Or you can look at this; Kojak High Lift Jack
John and Jan

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AnswerID: 591426

Reply By: Member - John - Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 at 07:25

Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 at 07:25
or this, (sorry, you don't seem to be able to include more that one link in a reply). Hydra High Lift Jack
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AnswerID: 591427

Reply By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 at 07:32

Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 at 07:32
Barry
Look here and find Masada bottle jacks. Squat with multiple lifts. The best you will find.

http://karmot.com/workshop_details.asp?cid=25
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AnswerID: 591428

Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 at 11:05

Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 at 11:05
I had trouble getting a hydraulic jack squat enough to fit under the axle with a flat tyre but with enough lift to provide clearance for an inflated tyre. Eventually I found this Masada 2-stage 150-240mm jack. It does the job perfectly.
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Allan

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AnswerID: 591432

Reply By: Sigmund - Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 at 12:07

Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 at 12:07
After lifting my wagon by 2" I measured the chassis rail heights on level ground and found that jacking needed to start at 30 cm, minus any deflation if that occurs. The std bottle jack wasn't going to work too well and screwing it up is a pain anyway.

There's a special on Kincrome hydraulic bottle jacks at the mo. Bursons stock them.https://www.kincrome.com.au/lifting-and-materials-handling/bottle-jacks
AnswerID: 591434

Follow Up By: Hoyks - Sunday, Oct 11, 2015 at 09:37

Sunday, Oct 11, 2015 at 09:37
That's why the standard jack is meant to fit under the axle/suspension arms. Fitting it under the chassis you need to lift the suspension travel as well as the tyre profile in order to get the new wheel on.
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Sunday, Oct 11, 2015 at 10:17

Sunday, Oct 11, 2015 at 10:17
Yes, it's quicker that way if it can work.
There's no good place on the arms on my wagon for the top of a bottle jack to land. And jacking up the arm changes the angle and increases the risks when on uneven ground. At the rear the axle is only 4 cm lower than the chassis rails and again there's no good land.
Different with a cup on a trolley jack.
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