DIY Camper Trailer tent repair tips

Submitted: Thursday, Oct 15, 2015 at 18:39
ThreadID: 130602 Views:4978 Replies:6 FollowUps:5
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Hi there Exploroz,
Our camper trailer is getting a bit old & needs some TLC but we're on a bit of a budget. We were hoping to do a few repairs ourselves.

- MOULD removal, argh! Have tried vinegar/water + brushing with no luck.

- Replacing a flyscreen door. Unfortunately the tears are beyond patching. Any idea where I can buy a suitable mesh?

- Replacing some tent peg loops.
My main query with the door & peg loops is ... how to sew through canvas??? I have a sewing machine but cannot imagine how I would ever get in the right position to use it.

Thanks!

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Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Thursday, Oct 15, 2015 at 18:48

Thursday, Oct 15, 2015 at 18:48
Hi Karyn,
I think you'll find you have to take the canvas off the camper to sew it - a real pain but you'll find its the only way. I've just been through the same thing to fix a zip.


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Reply By: Member - John and Val - Thursday, Oct 15, 2015 at 20:19

Thursday, Oct 15, 2015 at 20:19
Hi Karyn,

While I have never tackled repairs to a camper trailer I have worked on a few canvas tents with satisfactory results. Re sewing canvas - Phil B is probably right in suggsting that you have to take the canvas off the trailer. Sewing loops will be very hard work unless you have a heavy duty/industrial machine. I bought (for about $20) an old electric sewing machine to use, because newer machines dont have much clearance under the sewing foot, not enough to cope with a few thicknesses of canvas; and also if I wrecked it I wasnt writing off my "good" machine. But that probably wouldnt handle sewing loops. You may find hand sewing some loops is easier in the long run.

As for mending fibreglass mesh, the idea of sewing new mesh into the door or windows seemed too difficult. We trimmed out the worst bits, cut a patch a bit bigger than the hole and effectively stuck the layers together using a soldering iron (Im told that you will need a new tip for the iron after the job is done). Practice on some offcuts first. Or you could use some clear silastic with similar results. You could do that without removing the tent from the trailer, providing you could arrange a firm backing to work against. Buy the mesh at any hardware store.

Good luck with it, and good on you for repairing your gear.

Cheers,

Val.
J and V
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Friday, Oct 16, 2015 at 12:20

Friday, Oct 16, 2015 at 12:20
"(Im told that you will need a new tip for the iron after the job is done)"
Now who would have told you that Val? lol
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Member - Gnomey - Thursday, Oct 15, 2015 at 21:41

Thursday, Oct 15, 2015 at 21:41
Hi Karyn
Many years ago I bought a Speedy Stitcher made in the USA for leather and canvas work. It has a wooden handle which holds a spool/bobbin of waxed thread and a metal chuck, like a drill, which holds a needle that also serves as an awl. I've made and repaired all manner of things with it. Not as as fast as a machine but once mastered, every bit as good and a damn sight easier than using two needles worked in opposite directions through holes made with an awl. A saddler might beg to differ. :^)

A search of eBay tells me you can still buy them. Craft or leatherwork suppliers might also stock them. HTH.

Cheers
Mark
AnswerID: 591638

Follow Up By: Peter - Friday, Oct 16, 2015 at 08:41

Friday, Oct 16, 2015 at 08:41
Agree fully I brought one many years ago have repaired packs made canvas bicycle panniers. fixed shoes and it work well.
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Follow Up By: Peter - Friday, Oct 16, 2015 at 08:41

Friday, Oct 16, 2015 at 08:41
Agree fully I brought one many years ago have repaired packs made canvas bicycle panniers. fixed shoes and it work well.
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Friday, Oct 16, 2015 at 15:19

Friday, Oct 16, 2015 at 15:19
+1. Replaced the suspension straps on a cavalry-style saddle while out in the bush.
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Reply By: Sigmund - Friday, Oct 16, 2015 at 15:19

Friday, Oct 16, 2015 at 15:19
For the mould try Oil of Cloves from the chemist.
AnswerID: 591655

Reply By: Trevor&Verna - Saturday, Oct 17, 2015 at 17:48

Saturday, Oct 17, 2015 at 17:48
I've used Sikaflex urathane (available from a hardware shop - about $20 a cartridge) to 'glue' on patches of canvas over holes etc. Seems to do a good job - strong bond, flexible and lasting. Not as pretty as a professional sew job.
Also by sandwiching the canvas between two small pieces of water resistant ply (eg 40mmx30, 80x30) using a Tek screw or self tapper - one of the pieces of ply is longer and has a (say) 20mm hole in it to pass a rope through - you could possibly make peg loops.
Trevor&Verna, Kal WA

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AnswerID: 591681

Reply By: Tim F3 - Sunday, Oct 18, 2015 at 06:05

Sunday, Oct 18, 2015 at 06:05
There is a product on flea bay called "tear aid " that might solve your problem.
AnswerID: 591688

Follow Up By: Twinkles - Tuesday, Oct 20, 2015 at 08:52

Tuesday, Oct 20, 2015 at 08:52
I used this product to patch a pin hole n the roof of my camper. I put a small patch on each side and heated with hair dryer. Seems to work well
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