Plant identity - Gibson Desert

Submitted: Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 12:35
ThreadID: 130756 Views:2099 Replies:5 FollowUps:6
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Hi there,

Can anyone identify this plant found in the Gibson Desert?

A mate has asked me after seeing some of my pictures.
I only took the pictures as I had never seen the plant before, it could possibly be some sort of parasite.





Cheers if anyone can help.

Alan

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Reply By: Mick O - Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 12:42

Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 12:42
Al, the plant underneath it all looks like a dog wood or corkwood. As to the plant growing around it, I've no idea. I haven't seen anything like it before myself.

Cheers Mick
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Follow Up By: Rick (S.A.) - Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 16:37

Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 16:37
Mick,

agreed that it's hard to identify. To me the underneath plant looks like camel poison bush, Gyrostemon ramulosus, because of its pale wispy branches.

Cheers to you & Al

RM
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 16:57

Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 16:57
That exact thought crossed my mind as well Rick but it just didn't seem thick enough. Would have liked a better photo of the leaves/fronds.

Cheers Mick
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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Reply By: Steve in Kakadu - Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 12:47

Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 12:47
My guess is Mistletoe, I could be wrong.
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Reply By: Rick (S.A.) - Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 16:39

Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 16:39
Alan,
Is it regrowth or another species tangled up or possibly parasitic, like a mistletoe, in the other plant?

RM
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Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 17:19

Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 17:19
Gday Rick,

I think there is regrowth from the main tree as well as this other plant.
I've only the two pictures, this one is zoomed up from Paint Shop.


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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 21:01

Sunday, Nov 01, 2015 at 21:01
Hi Alan

It is hard to see without seeing more images but I am going against what others have said and would put my money (mind you I do not have much to lose) on it being Gyrostemon ramulosue or as it is comply known as Camel Poison Bush and can grow up to 4m in height.

In the immature stages of growth it looks like the image you have shown with the mature branches above. The tree is also found throughout the Great Victoria Desert and into the Gibson Desert.

Below are images of regrowth from a remote area of the Great Victoria Desert that had been burnt out with very hot fires in the summer of 2012 - 2013 and this regrowth is how the desert can respond within 18 months.








Here are some more images from the Flora Base of WA at the link below:

Flora Base




Cheers




Stephen
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Monday, Nov 02, 2015 at 12:13

Monday, Nov 02, 2015 at 12:13
I agree with Stephen re poison camel bush. Its certainly not a mistletoe. The thick growth that you can see is just regrowth from the original plant as far as I can see.

BTW the zoom feature that David has incorporated into the photos is pretty neat.

Cheers,

Val.
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Monday, Nov 02, 2015 at 12:26

Monday, Nov 02, 2015 at 12:26
Zooming in to Alan's first photo I can just make out some flowers that look like PCB flowers, and also some smaller leaves. But the second photo seems to show only trunks of PCB trees/shrubs. So, ruling out mistletoe (because afaik there are no mistletoes with leaves like that), I think those small leaves are a witches broom that has formed on the PCB plant. Witches brooms are not uncommon and are caused by some infection or damage to the plant, interrupting the growing points and instead making the infected plant produce a dense bunch of small, often weak growth, hence the name. They can often look like a mistletoe.

Cheers,

Val.
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Follow Up By: equinox - Monday, Nov 02, 2015 at 20:05

Monday, Nov 02, 2015 at 20:05
Thanks everyone for the replies, I will let my friend know.
Lucky I wasn't riding a camel at the time.

Cheers
Alan

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Reply By: Member - Stanley D - Wednesday, Nov 04, 2015 at 23:12

Wednesday, Nov 04, 2015 at 23:12
Dear Alan, I would have to agree with Steven L.
Gyrostemon ramulosus Desf. Corkybark: Shrub to 5 metres growing on desert and sand dunes,
Flora base: Flora of Western Australia ref: https://florabase.dpaw.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/2784.
Thanks for the question.
Regards, Stanley
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