Lokka automatic locker to rear of 105 series Landcruiser

Submitted: Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 15:04
ThreadID: 131273 Views:3394 Replies:3 FollowUps:8
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Have already fitted a Lokka to the front and am very pleased with the performance. Thinking of fitting one to the rear but not sure how it will perform on gravel roads, particularly on bends. Will it automatically lock in these circumstances?
Anyone who has had experience with these units could you please let me know how you are getting on.
Thanks in anticipation.
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Reply By: Lloyd M - Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 15:46

Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 15:46
I've had them fitted in my 80 series for atleast 6 years, they are still working extremely well. You will notice some handling differences both on the dirt and tar, however from my point of view it is a small price to pay when considering the extra traction I have with the camper trailer in tow.

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Lloyd Mac.

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Follow Up By: Member - DingoBlue(WA) - Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 15:50

Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 15:50
Thanks Lloyd,
Your experience has confirmed my thoughts.
Thanks again
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Reply By: gbc - Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 17:48

Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 17:48
They don't automatically lock. They are 'normally' locked. They unlock when an outside wheel is spun faster than a driven wheel. Hope this helps.
I've had them in the front of vehicles before, and would be happy to have one in the rear as well.
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Follow Up By: Jackolux - Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 18:06

Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 18:06
That's right un-lokka is really a better term , l have had one in the front of a 4x4 , really good thing

I really don't think l would have one in the rear ,
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Follow Up By: Member - DingoBlue(WA) - Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 20:03

Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 20:03
Jackolux,
Why wouldn't you put one in the rear?
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Follow Up By: 671 - Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 22:07

Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 22:07
Why wouldn't you put one in the rear?
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They can cause some degree of rear wheel steering in some situations. This can be just about eliminated if the driver fully understands the operation of the locker but I doubt if very many do. There is an endless amount of incorrect information about them on the net. I am not aware of any car manufacturer who has fitted an auto locker to the rear. I think far too many drivers would get into trouble with it.

One simple example would be turning a 90 degree corner at slow speed in a city. We have all seen cars slow down then turn quickly and accelerate away rapidly in first or second gear. The car might lean a little and the inside wheel will loose traction and spin for a second or two. That will lock the diff instantly and could cause a sudden and unexpected change of direction of the car.

A similar thing can happen at higher speeds if a powerful car is accelerated quickly to change lanes or overtake. Wet roads can make the loss of traction of one wheel much easier.

The dirt roads that you mentioned can also be a problem. I have a friend with lokkas in both ends of his car and he said he has occasionally felt the car wanting to go straight ahead while turning on smooth unsealed surfaces. This would be because the wheel on the outside of the corner has not got sufficient traction to roll ahead of the other one. He does understand their operation so he aware that it can happen and it has never worried him.

The basic operation of these things is the wheel with the shortest distance to travel will always be driven by engine applied torque while the one with the longest distance will be able to roll ahead driven by road applied torque. If the driven wheel looses traction, the diff will lock and the car will keep going providing the other wheel has traction.

In practice both wheels vary rarely turn at exactly the same speed due to constant variations in road surface. The variations are major in the bush but still exist on sealed roads. Tyre diameter also varies ever so slightly due to different amounts of wear. There may also be minor differences in diameter between same size tyres from different manufacturers. The result is you can drive an auto diff locked car around cities or the bush all day with few if any problems but you can't do that with a manually locked diff.
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Follow Up By: Member - DingoBlue(WA) - Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 22:16

Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 22:16
Thanks for your comprehensive reply. It appears that there may be a bit of 'push' from the rear causing a bit of understeer in certain circumstances. Being aware of this possibility, one should have no major issues.
Thanks again.
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Follow Up By: Jackolux - Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 22:45

Monday, Jan 04, 2016 at 22:45
Yep what the bloke above said , l had 2 Air Lockers in my 06 Hilux , now have 2 eLockers in my Dmax ,
Get a eLocker for the rear .
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Tuesday, Jan 05, 2016 at 00:05

Tuesday, Jan 05, 2016 at 00:05
I have a Detroit (basically the same as a Lokka but better quality) in the rear of my Landrover and you would never know it is there in normal onroad and offroad driving.

IMHO the issues with "automatic lockers" are over emphasised.

Garry
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Tuesday, Jan 05, 2016 at 06:51

Tuesday, Jan 05, 2016 at 06:51
Mate, I had a Lokka in the rear of my Jeep and it was terrible. It was great off road but around town it changed the driving charactetistics of the car, even threw it into limp mode on many roundabouts. I think it depends on the car as I've since learned that my model Jeep just can't have one fitted due to the sensitivity of the ecu. I wish I had known that before I paid the money. The manufacturer's were unaware of the problem but many on the Jeep forums knew it well.
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Reply By: Member - Alastair D (NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 05, 2016 at 08:43

Tuesday, Jan 05, 2016 at 08:43
some years ago when I was deciding which lockers to buy, I tested a vehicle with Lokkas f/r in town. I hated the way the rear behaved when going round roundabouts and tight corners. On that alone I went with e-lockers f/r in my LC100. I have previously had air lockers in vehicles and have had problems with leaks inside and out due to seal failure or damage by sticks etc. My e-lockers have been great.

I have no experience with lokkas off road which is where I think they perform best from what I have been told/read.

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