Protection offered by nudge bar

Hi,
I have just bought a new (2015) Holden Colorado and am looking at what protection I should add to the front of the vehicle. Originally I was thinking I would get a bull bar but have been unable to find a style that I like. I bought the Colorado because I really like the look of the front but it seems that most bull bars (including the ones from ARB) pretty much cover the front of the vehicle, hiding the nice car that I bought. The genuine Holden bull bar is styled to show off the front grille (which I like) but I don't like the 'teardrop wings' that go out and around the headlights.
Genuine Holden bull bar
It would be great if I could find something like the genuine Holden one but without the 'wings'. Sort of like the ARB Sahara bar but I don't think they make that for a Colorado?
ARB Sahara Bar
Does anyone know of any bull bars that might suit me?

So I started looking at nudge bars as they don't cover as much of the vehicle as the bull bars. I understand that bull bars offer a lot more than nudge bars but thats not my question here. I am mainly looking at the ECB high loop series 2 nudge bar.
ECB high loop nudge bar

However, I am concerned about how much protection a nudge bar will offer. Is it even worth having one? I do a few outback trips a year and have only hit 2 roos in 30-40 years. Will a nudge bar give me any protection from hitting a roo? I'm not too concerned about cosmetic/headlight damage because insurance will cover it all but I wouldn't want to crack my radiator and be stuck out in the bush. Will a nudge bar at least protect the radiator if I hit a roo and allow me to get back to town? Or will it go straight through that and I would be stranded anyway? If a nudge bar doesn't offer any protection am I better off not wasting my money on one?

Thanks :)
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Top End Az - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 14:32

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 14:32
I think a lot of folks who buy nudge bars do so simply so they can mount spotties or an aerial without going the full expense of a bulbar.

As far as hitting a roo; I guess you would have to hit the roo dead centre of the car for it to offer some protection, but often that's not the case
AnswerID: 594614

Follow Up By: sam d47 - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 14:38

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 14:38
I understand that it is unlikely that I would hit a roo dead centre but I feel that is the scenario that would be most likely to damage the car (radiator) to the point where we could not drive on further. If I did hit it dead centre, would the nudge bar provide enough protection?
Thanks.
0
FollowupID: 863092

Reply By: Member - Allan L2 - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 14:37

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 14:37
Hi Sam, I have the previous model Colorado with a genuine nudge bar. In my opinion all the nudge bar is good for is somewhere to mount driving lights & radio antenna. Its mounting points are very weak.
Cheers,
AnswerID: 594615

Follow Up By: sam d47 - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 14:42

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 14:42
Thanks Allan. Do you think it would provide enough protection to the radiator though to ensure that I could get to the next town? Alternatively, if I hit a roo with no protection is it a certainty that the radiator/engine would be damaged to the point of not being drivable? I assume that with no extra protection there would be a fair bit of damage but perhaps it is designed to withstand a bit of impact? Does anyone have any experience with collisions with no front protection in a Colorado?
0
FollowupID: 863093

Reply By: Gramps - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 14:47

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 14:47
I don't regard nudge bars as much protection from roo strikes at all. A friend hit a roo in his late model Prado (with all the OEM fruit) and a nudge bar. Damage bill went 14k+. Sensors etc etc for everything that opens and shuts will do that to your wallet. Luckily his was a company car.

Regards
AnswerID: 594616

Follow Up By: sam d47 - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 14:49

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 14:49
Do you know if the nudge bar perhaps gave that little bit of protection and enabled him to drive off from it and get back to town? Or was there too much damage done even with the bar and he got stuck there?
0
FollowupID: 863094

Follow Up By: Gramps - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 15:05

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 15:05
Sam,

He was able to effect some bush repairs to get to the next town and get it checked before continuing on. He was lucky.

I hit a roo full on and pushed a full steel ARB bullbar up at an angle. With a nudge bar I would have been stuffed. I've managed to push the bar down a bit but it is still up from level.

It boils down to how big the roo is, how fast you're travelling and how strong your bar and it's mounts are.

Nudge bars are to mount lights, aerials etc and provide some protection from VERY low speed impacts such as stop-start traffic whoops! and supermarket carpark nudges, in my opinion.

Regards
1
FollowupID: 863095

Reply By: Member - Allan L2 - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 14:54

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 14:54
Sam, my opinion is no, it would not provide suitable protection. In saying that I guess any little extra may be of minor help.
Cheers,
AnswerID: 594618

Reply By: Les - PK Ranger - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 15:05

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 15:05
Sam, I opted for a nudge bar, mostly for holding the spots, UHF aerial, and sand flag attachment.
I drive country / outback a lot, sometimes all night, and haven't hit any roos ever (driving now over 35 years, and yes, I'm very tired, lol).

Mind you, I'm not like a Mack driver with a 7 post bullar that could steamroll a buffalo, and where they don't even slow for roos (and I fully understand why).

If there're animals about, I just slow to where I can see well enough in front to adapt to any animals I see to avoid them or slow til I can stop if they become a risk.
That means the HIDs that give me real 700m vision out front . . . and I have a couple of small led light bars to fit soon to give me better in close vision to the sides out to say 100m.

My nudge would offer me nil protection in reality, and I know it.
They will just fold up with a low speed full strike, no doubt about it, but they might stop a mediocre strike from going through the radiator, it's just a matter of luck.

Many of the so called bullbars out there aren't going to give 100 protection either, again it's just luck, and the repair bill will be high still as the chassis will possibly get more damage with a solid bar.

If you go the bullbar, you might need suspension upgrade to cope with that and other small mods at the front of vehicle.
I did this anyway all round, but some people aren't really thinking of suspension until they create the need with more weight / mods.
AnswerID: 594619

Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 20:31

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 20:31
I think you are spot on there Les. I've done a heap of night driving in roo country over many years and hit very few roos and always at lowish speeds. You are much more careful without a bar. A nudge bar is just a place to hang ornaments, the mounting points are pretty weak.
1
FollowupID: 863133

Reply By: Top End Az - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 15:09

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 15:09
The short answer is it won't be enough to protect your car/ radiator unless its a small wallaby or something and even then its still a lottery. I don't think its worth spending the cash in this instance.
AnswerID: 594620

Follow Up By: Top End Az - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 19:03

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 19:03
If you read East Coast bull bars description on their nudge bars, they state that the bars are good for protection bumps and nudges, and handy for mounting spotties

https://www.ecb.com.au/Infopage.php?id=3
0
FollowupID: 863125

Reply By: Baz - The Landy - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 15:28

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 15:28
Sam

Some context...

You've hit two 'roos in 30-40 years, so on average one every 18 years or so (on average)...

And if it is any comfort, I'm about the same.

Now you could hit a dozen in a road trip next week and your average will go out the window, such is life!

But unless you are driving at night in the bush regularly and it is around 18 years since you last hit a 'roo, then perhaps you should keep the money in your pocket - there'll be plenty of other ways to let after market equipment suppliers into your wallet.

Cheers, Baz - The Landy

AnswerID: 594621

Reply By: Ron N - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 15:38

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 15:38
The only time you're likely to hit 'roos, is at dusk and dawn - and at night.
If you don't drive very much at those times, you don't need any 'roo protection.
A nudge bar is a city accessory, designed to stop people backing into your front end and damaging your vehicle.
They offer bugger-all protection against even a modest size 'roo.
If you only do a few outback trips a year and don't drive in the dark, you can survive admirably without any bars.
If you go bush and want to drive at night, you really need a proper 'roo bar.
The 'roo threat comes from narrow, bush-lined roads, little-used roads, and the night hours, when 'roos get on the move.

That ECB mob have some nice full-size bars.
You don't need to go overboard with a decent bar purchase, just a standard alloy bar will provide adequate protection.
What you do need is something that stops a 'roo from going through your radiator, because when that happens, you're stopped in your tracks, and a tilt-tray is the only way on from there.
Current vehicles have very little by way of radiator protection, so you need to invest in some if you want 100% assurance you won't be stranded.

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 594622

Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 16:25

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 16:25
My opinion, Ron and others have summed it up pretty well. If you are planning a fair chunk of your travels to involve dawn and dusk country driving in areas known for having a decent 'roo population get a propper 'roo bar.
Just as an aside I hate the term "bull bar" when applied to even the largest 4WD Landcruiser, Patrol, Jeep sized vehicle. A 600 kg or thereabouts bull, or even one of his marginally smaller wives will demolish your so called bull bar, the front of your vehicle and unless you and your passengers aren't terribly lucky,the occupants as well if you collide at anything like country speeds.
If all you need is protection from "nudges" such as you get around town, shopping center car parks and the like, then a nudge bar will suffice.
Our RAV 4 is fitted with one and that's about all I expect it to protect the front from.

Cheers
Pop
2
FollowupID: 863100

Follow Up By: Ron N - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 17:46

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 17:46
I might add - all the ARB products I have ever purchased (and I've bought a lot, having owned fleets of Hiluxes and Landcruisers, all working through the remote Goldfields areas of W.A.) - were excellent products that were well-thought out, well-built, and they looked good as well.

That ARB Sahara bar is as good as you want for 'roo protection on 4WD's.
The headlight "wings" on bars are really only to try and reduce expensive headlight damage - but in general, if you hit a 'roo on the end of a 'roo bar, it will often damage the headlight, anyway.

The height of the main section of the bar on todays 4WD's generally ensures it hits a 'roo in the main body area - except if you're unlucky enough to hit a 'roo on the up-bounce - whereby a bar isn't going to stop the 'roo from landing on the bonnet, anyway.

Cheers, Ron.
0
FollowupID: 863112

Reply By: Les - PK Ranger - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 15:42

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 15:42
If you do go the nudge, try and get one with a mid or lower cross bar too.
Mine is just open through the middle, but some brands have that extra cross support, which could assist in a low to moderate lower strike situation.
AnswerID: 594624

Reply By: MEMBER - Darian, SA - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 15:56

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 15:56
In my view, if we city based drivers are to travel in regional and outback regions, AND we think there is a fair chance we are going to hit an animal, then a substantial bull bar is the only worthwhile solution. My first three fourbies, driven over 25 years, all had bull bars......in all that time, I hit one quite small kanga and it didn't leave a mark (on the car.....:-). On my latest, beautiful, expensive carriage I have no bull bar - we seem only to ever travel during 'office hours' and based on our record over those years, I'll chance it with no bar......and crikey...if I was to get a decent bullbar fitted, they'd carve chunks out of the front bodywork !
AnswerID: 594627

Reply By: The Bantam - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 16:36

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 16:36
If you want protection against animal strike that is worth a damn ..... it won't be pretty ... get used to that Idea.

Do ya need it ..... yeh well ..... ask ya self ..... "am I feelin' lucky" ... well are ya.

Some people have a fairly low risk of animal strike ... due to the times and places they travel.

Others like my brother ...... he hates hitting roos, .... he is not concerned that his hand built bar will fail. .... but he recons if he hits a big one he has to change the alternator ... because the armiture shifts and chews out the seal on the vac pump ...... he always carries a complete alternator.

How you feel about the risks is up to you. ....... but protection is never pretty.

cheers
AnswerID: 594632

Reply By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 17:43

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 17:43
A nudge bar does what it says ... NUDGE !
If you hit square centre both roo and nudge bar will be into your radiator.
Imagine hitting a stationary 20kg bag of cement sitting on a milk crate at 80kph.
If you see a roo coming in you periferal vision try and clout it with either front corner and send it sprawling.
I live just north of Coffs Harbour and there are thousands of them.
If you attempt to miss them with the front of your vehicle they keep on coming at full tilt and they can't stop and run into the door.
Living is a journey,it depends on where you go !
VKS 737 mobile 0049 selcall 0049

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 594637

Follow Up By: Ron N - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 17:52

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 17:52
Pinko, my brother used to own a HX Holden Statesman - and the back corner of our farm at Wandering, W.A., could be accessed from the Albany Hwy, via an old logging track - so we used to use that track as a short cut to the Hwy.

One day, he was puttering along the track with the Statesman, with his wife and 3 boys on board - and his drivers window down - when his wife screamed, "LOOK OUT!!"

He turned to see a huge 'roo boring down on him, at full speed, aiming for his door and open window!!
He recoiled in shock, expecting to collect a 'roo through the window - when that big ole hopper just took a mighty leap and sailed right over the roof of the Statesman! - without touching it - and carried on without breaking his stride! LOL

Cheers, Ron.
0
FollowupID: 863113

Follow Up By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 18:01

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 18:01
Ron
The roo might have heard the lady yell "LOOK OUT" and jumped that little extra ?
Living is a journey,it depends on where you go !
VKS 737 mobile 0049 selcall 0049

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

2
FollowupID: 863117

Follow Up By: Ron N - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 18:44

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 18:44
I don't know! - but it sure was a performance worth seeing, apparently!
You see videos of 'roos hopping over obstructions, and they can pull off amazing jumps, with what appears to be little extra effort.

0
FollowupID: 863122

Reply By: Slow one - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 20:06

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 20:06
Check out a smart bar for you vehicle. Light, strong and you may like the look.Colorado smart bar
AnswerID: 594641

Follow Up By: sam d47 - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 20:16

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 20:16
Thank you for the suggestion but I dont want something that covers too much of the front of the ute because its looks are what I bought it for. The smart bar seems to cover pretty much the entire front so I'm no too keen on it.
1
FollowupID: 863132

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 22:44

Friday, Jan 08, 2016 at 22:44
Sam,

If you don't want to spoil the look of the Colorado's front with a bull bar, then the cheapest advice I can suggest, if you are travelling in 'roo country, is not to drive between 6pm and 6am.

That way you save on additional lighting, and keep your no-claim bonus.

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

2
FollowupID: 863143

Reply By: Batt's - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 05:21

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 05:21
I use to fit nudge bars and all other 4WD accessories and I wouldn't want to hit a decent roo with one they are extremely light and are only as good as the points they are mounted to which can be very flimsy in some cases.
To me personally Safety and practicality come before looks it's a 4WD not a show car regardless of how much it cost. I would prefer to be able to keep driving after an animal strike than spend a night or 2 parked up just because I thought a bull bar was to ugly. Not having a go at you but another problem is that manufacturers are giving customers what they want by contouring bars around cars and fitting them to close so they look less bulky and more attractive which creates another problem causing you to still get a lot of damage from a minor hit. A bull bar should sit well clear of the vehicle greatly reducing damage from animal strikes but it's mostly about looks these days and protection plays second fiddle but also car manufacturers are making it difficult because of poor designing as well. Just remember there's a lot more wildlife around these days especially on the sides of the roads due to the dry weather over the past few years.
AnswerID: 594653

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 08:56

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 08:56
This one ticks all the boxes, Batts. Except maybe airbag compliant. :-)



Only trouble is the 'roos hit the front, then slip around the side and whack the door.


Bob



Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 863160

Follow Up By: Batt's - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 10:29

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 10:29
That's it Bob spot on dare I say it without criticism from others when men drove their real 4WD outback,
1
FollowupID: 863170

Follow Up By: Batt's - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 10:38

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 10:38
Should have mentioned my bull bar has been mounted about 3" further forward than the standard bar.
0
FollowupID: 863171

Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 18:45

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 18:45
This one has squared up two roos, a cluster of goats, a stand of Silky Oak trees, and about 20 yards of embankement without bending a millimeter. Sorry, won't remote travel without it.

0
FollowupID: 863204

Follow Up By: Batt's - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 22:53

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 22:53
That's one of the old original bull bars wasn't it they suited the 40 ser cruisers never had a bar on my shorty but I wanted one of those types.
0
FollowupID: 863223

Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 23:41

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 23:41
Batt's - yep - built like the proverbial brick outhouse ... one tough mother.
0
FollowupID: 863225

Reply By: vk1dx - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 08:45

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 08:45
Lots of good info for you above. I did a quick search and couldn't find anything in this thread about the ripple paint.

DON'T GET THE RIPPLE PAINT.

The slightest scratch or damage and the whole bloody thing has to be repainted unless you can find a good spray painter. We had one with ripple paint and you can't even polish a scratch out or go to Bunnings and get a can of paint to fix it with.

Phil
AnswerID: 594655

Reply By: Old Grumpy - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 10:14

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 10:14
Hi Sam, I have a 2012/3 Isuzu D-max, similar to the Colorado, and have the Isuzu oem bull bar fitted. I had driven/ridden 1000s/ks and only been hit by one roo (from the side) until recently on a back road in the Grampians in the MIDDLE of the day when a roo cut across my bow and would have taken out my headlight/running light and blinker. As it was the bar did its job and although the blinker assembly was displaced (a roadside repair) there was no other damage. A nudge bar would have been totally useless. You state you're not not worried about your headlights but there is also the risk of a mud guard being pushed back against the front tyre (seen it done) and if you can't separate them it's a tow job. There is also the inconvenience of having your vehicle languishing in a workshop awaiting parts, they don't panel beat any more, just replace panels. Cheers.
AnswerID: 594657

Reply By: Old Grumpy - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 10:40

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 10:40
Slightly off topic but related to animal strikes, I find it humane to carry a pick handle to euthenase badly injured animals in remote areas. It is an unpleasant job but the thought of leaving an animal to die slowly in pain is even more abhorrent. I adopted this habit after encountering another driver who was distressed, not due the damage to his vehicle, but that the roo he had hit was mangled but still alive. Not a tree in sight and my jack handle was an inferior substitute for a big stick.
AnswerID: 594660

Follow Up By: Ron N - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 12:18

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 12:18
Good point, OG. Used to carry a rifle in the ute all the time in the old days - that's not exactly PC today.

Missus and I were leaving Kununurra in late August last year to drive to Broome, and on the outskirts of town, we were a bit upset to see a small wallaby floundering around by the side of the road with a broken leg - obviously hit by a car.
We couldn't get near it, it was still able to hobble away faster than we could run.

We decided all we could do was alert the local vet, which we did via email (as she wasn't answering her phone for anything but critical emergencies) - but a short while later I got an email response from her thanking us for the alert, and they were going out to see if they could find the animal.
I don't know what the outcome was, I heard no more about it.

But - if the situation had been well outside any town, the only option would have been to just drive on.
If the animal can't move, that assists in putting them down - but when they can still move off a distance, that's when you can't do anything much.

Cheers, Ron.
1
FollowupID: 863178

Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 13:00

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 13:00
I'm with you, Grumpy. Mine's an axe handle - or a long handled shovel.

I've had to do it twice, both times primarily to put the animal out of its misery, but also to relieve the distressed drivers of the vehicles that hit or found the victims. On both occasions those drivers were simply unable to deal with the situation. It's not pleasant but it's sometimes all you can, and should, do.

Cheers
FrankP

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

1
FollowupID: 863180

Reply By: Geepeem - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 17:21

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 17:21
Hi Sam, I was a bit like you I didn't want to lose all the nice chrome at front of my new truck by putting on a full bull bar. (to do so the existing OEM front bar has to come off).. So I opted for a good quality nudge bar from ECB. It is very strong…about 7mm thick and 76mm diameter. I am not suggesting it will do the job of a bull bar. It won't. But I believe it will give me adequate radiator protection to limp into the next town should the worst happen. Its a trade off of risk vs looks to me. You seem to want to go the nudge bar route. I'd say go for it but get a strong one from ECB.

Cheers Geepeem
I will post a photo of mine later as its not on my laptop.
AnswerID: 594669

Follow Up By: Glen M11 - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 18:02

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 18:02


Here is pic of mine Sam.
Basically a strong Nudge Bar is just the centre part of a bull bar without the wings.
Its a personal preference but I am happy with my choice of protection/risk.
Cheers
0
FollowupID: 863200

Follow Up By: sam d47 - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 21:47

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 21:47
Geepeem, the ECB one is the only nudge that I am really considering. Do you feel that it would bend very easily when pressure is applied? Can you bend it back just by pushing on it? I'm not really sure what they are mounted to underneath so cannot workout how strong the mounting points would be.


Glen, I haven't seen that one before and don't mind it. Where did you get that from?
0
FollowupID: 863218

Follow Up By: Geepeem - Sunday, Jan 10, 2016 at 06:59

Sunday, Jan 10, 2016 at 06:59
Hi Sam,
Mine is from ECB. I live in SEQ so I went to the actual ECB factory in Snook Street Clontarf where you can talk to the engineers and designers as well as the sales staff if you want to.
Mine is fitted by heavy steel brackets straight onto the chassis rails. (All they needed to do was cut a small piece of the plastic cowling out to fit. Fitting overall took about 1 hour including a few adjustments so it did not set off the front sensors or parking radar on mine).

There is no movement in it at all by pushing it. You certainly could not bend it. Not sure if they use same size material as ours (76mm diam) on smaller trucks. But email them or ring the factory direct for better information. I feel mine is as strong as a bull bar in the centre…it is just I don't have the wings of a bull bar.

There are cheaper and weaker nudge bars around. But ECB are the best in my opinion. (I am not related to Co in any way).

Cheers
1
FollowupID: 863228

Reply By: HarryH - Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 22:16

Saturday, Jan 09, 2016 at 22:16
I hit a medium to largish roo the other day in my hilux doing 100 Ks an hour, It hit just left of center and I got him on the down hop thankfully. The hilux has a nudge bar on the front with spotties attached, the Lux is still drivable but has significant faring/grill damage with the nudge bar pushed all the way back into the grill and the wheel arch just rubbing on my left tire. I haven't rang the insurance company yet but I'm hoping to replace the damaged farings with a proper bull bar, I'm hoping it will be cheaper for the insurer to put a bull bar on than fix the farings, but that might be wishful thinking?

Its my opinion that a nudge bar is definitely better than nothing (I'm still driving after all) but give me a proper steel bull bar any day.

It should be noted that the nudge bar looks to me to be stronger than the factory offerings but I am no expert thats for sure and it was on the vehicle when I bought it.

AnswerID: 594674

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)