Single burner butane gas stoves

Submitted: Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 16:55
ThreadID: 131727 Views:2962 Replies:21 FollowUps:33
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I just finished reading the thread about the safety of the safety of these low pressure, cannister fed butan gas stoves. The warning and recall appeared a couple of years ago.

Does anyone know what the real issue is? There were two things mentioned in the thread, namely not turning the trivet over and using a wide pot or pan. Both of which were simply overcome by both reading the instructions and using some common sense.

We are off on our first long trip soon and I am quite happy to take ours but the "minister" isn't.

Any comments

Phil
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Reply By: HKB Electronics - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:12

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:12
From memory, the new ones have been changed in that you can't
use them without the trivet being on the correct way, and I think they
changed the gas valve as some of the old ones didn't turn the gas off
if the cylinder overheated.

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Reply By: Member - Alastair D (NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:12

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:12
We bought one years ago for a 9 month trip through Central Asia to avoid the problems with different fittings for gas cylinders. Have continued to use it because it is compact and efficient and a bunch of cans are easier to store away than a big cylinder. We have had no problems even though I did not read the instructions - male.

I have heard out more problems with full sized systems - failed regs, leaking pipes/joints, bad taps. In our new truck based rig we have gone all electric but still carry the small unit and use it quite a bit outside.

Only problem we ever had was with the gas in v cold climates. Just need to warm them up.
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Reply By: Zippo - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:16

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:16
Phil, I recall posting it that earlier thread. We went through the same analysis and consideration that you and others have done. We ONLY use ours to boil the billy, so the reflected/redirected exhaust heat is not the same issue as with oversize pans and bbq plates. We also ONLY use butane canisters with the integrated safety relief valve. We have continued to use ours for that purpose, in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and cognisant of the risk factors.

I won't try and tell others what they should do. At the end of the day, it is a decision each owner must make.
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Reply By: Member - Odog - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:24

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:24
G'day Phil. I think it's more a problem, like you have said, using a big fry pan or pot, causes the canister to heat up, as long as your not covering the whole thing, and the heat doesn't get trapped, it's all good.. We love ours, and in the past, we have used a larger fry pan, but will be carefull how we use it in the future. I did see somewhere, that they are now making the canisters a bit different, think the new ones, if it becomes to hot, the canister has a built in vent, to release pressure, instead of just going BANG!.. Like everything, common sense prevails.. Or as some people say, "natural selection"... I think they are so handy, and easy, whether boiling the Billy for a quick coffee, or just cooking up a few snags, for a quick dinner..
One thing that I am concerned with, is the canisters rubbing on something, while driving, like the old cans of beer in the fridge, I've had that happen a few times.. Open the fridge or esky, and one or two cans of beer have rubbed a hole in each other.. I know the gas canisters aren't aluminium, but the thought remains.. Have a safe trip.. Cheers Odog
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Reply By: Idler Chris - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:27

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:27
Hi Phil,
the main issue was by putting a large pot or pan on it so that the heat is deflected towards the canister which obviously can only take so much heat. The law was changed once again for the lowest common denominator in our society. Use them as per instructions and there is no issue. You just need to make sure that anyone who uses the stove knows the instructions. I have had two for years with no issue, the only change I have made is that now I will not lend them, or let any other person use them.
Cheers,
Chris
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Follow Up By: Geoffr17 - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 07:37

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 07:37
It's the way they are used . The minister or others do not report how the people were using them at the time.

I Believe Idler Chris is on the money . I have used one for years as well AS YOUR MEANT TOO. per the instructions.

Maybe we should throw away all our cars as well , because I know for sure if you do not use them properly out on the road you will have a accident for sure.

Again all this rubbish surfaces to protect the FEW who don't read or follow instruction , have an accident , and it's everybody else's fault.

So let's ban everything in case some don't use it properly.
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Reply By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:32

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:32
These posts just about sum it up. We have also spoken to others off-line and they say the same. Trivet flipped, gas canister seated properly and not to use an oversized pot or pan. ie Don't cover that hole on the top of the canister compartment.

Still I will be interested to see if there are other issues that I missed.

Looking god for the planning. Can't wait.

Phil
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Reply By: The Explorer - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:32

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:32
Hi

The advice HERE is to dispose of any stove manufactured before July 2015 and replace it with a compliant one. Easy.

I know some people dont like being told what to do but its not that hard (or expensive) really to update to a newer safer model. Irrespective of how much common sense a person my possess they will nonetheless be far less likely to set fire to themselves or their friends/relatives at the cost of about $25.

Cheers
Greg
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Follow Up By: Hoyks - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:50

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 17:50
What he said, bin it and buy a new one. $25-$30 or a helicopter ride and skin grafts?

I'm told the gas cans haven't changed, so you can still use your stock of them.



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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 19:32

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 19:32
Appreciate your opinion Greg but they are twice what we paid for ours in 2009.

Thanks

Still to drive the Googs track mate. Too many hospital things and I can only skip so many.

Phil
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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 19:50

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 19:50
Sorry Phil, you have lost me. They cost about ~$25 now which is close on nothing. Why bother taking the additional risk. And you will have the added benefit of having a wife more at ease while making her a cuppa. And we all know the saying ..a happy wife is a .....

Cheers
Greg
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 21:25

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 21:25
That's a better price. The price is irrelevant anyway as others have said and I agree. I did a brief search and found some for more than $30. We only paid $16 each for two.

Catchya

Phil
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Follow Up By: Stephen F2 - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 22:32

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 22:32
New canisters do not blow up I have box of them
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Reply By: Terry O - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 19:02

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 19:02
If the canisters are still the same has any one got a new one and an old one to see the difference between the two.
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Reply By: Member - WBS - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 19:04

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 19:04
I had one of those butane stoves and used it for years without any dramas. When I read about the apparent design fault that resulted in the death of one person and injuries to others, I threw my perfectly good unit out. I am yet to buy a new one but I do intend to and at $25-$35 its hardly going to send me broke. They are very convenient.

WBS
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Reply By: mike39 - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 19:33

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 19:33
They are perfect to use with a round bottomed wok.
Stir fry on the road, simplicity itself.
mike
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 21:22

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 21:22
Don't own a wok. Rather a good steak and vegetables.

Phil
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Follow Up By: gbc - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 09:49

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 09:49
Just spat coffee all over my computer. Nothing so funny as irony.
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 20:44

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 20:44
Hi Phil

We have been using them for countless years without any issues at all.

The monent that the recall was announced , which is over 12 months ago, we took our safety as priority no 1 and got rid of them straight away.

Like Greg has said above, for the cost of only $25, anyone that does not buy the new approved type must by bloody crazy and a fool.

They still use the same canisters, so what you still have will not go to waste. We purchased the new approved type the other week and will outlay another $25 to get a second one, as like we all know, they are a very handy little cooker.

So go on and do yourself a safety favour, if not for yourself, then for your kids and wife and lash out for only $25



Cheers



Stephen
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 21:44

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 21:44
,
I have contributed to designing butane plants.
I have operated butane plants.
I have maintained butane plants.
I reckon I know butane and its mates.
When I first saw these stoves, I said "No Way".
I don't care how they trick them up.... I still say "No Way".

There is no way that I would put a cupful of butane in a tin can then light a fire next to it.
There is no way that I would carry a handful of tin cans holding butane in my vehicle.
Sure, you have done it for years, but your wife and kids may become tomorrow's headline.
You carry on about the perils of snatch straps, hi lift jacks and winch cables yet you dice with these dodgy toys.
You amaze me.

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 07:04

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 07:04
Your point well put Allan.

Phil
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Follow Up By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 08:21

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 08:21
Gday Allan
Just one question, "What do you cook with when on the road?"
Muzbry
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 08:52

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 08:52
Hi Muz,

We cook with a 2 burner folding camp stove connected with 60cm hose to a 4kg LPG bottle.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 09:51

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 09:51
Really would like to see some statistics on how many of the Suitcase cookers sold / blown up / people killed / burnt compared to the same for the 2 burner camp stove connected to a 4 / 9 kg cylinder ….. bet u a beer or 3 that one works out to be just as dangerous as the other...
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Follow Up By: gbc - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 09:54

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 09:54
I'm with you AllanB, they just look fundamentally wrong. I've camped with other guys who have them, they are all still alive and they've made me plenty of coffees and bacon and egg rolls, but I can't bring myself to buy one.
This coming from a bloke who has happily used a petrol stove for 25 years.......
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 12:35

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 12:35
I have to agree with Alloy c/t. There has only been a small handful of cases of people being burnt with butane stoves - and there have probably been near the same number burnt with LPG due to leaking hoses and fittings.

Some people can't be trusted with a rubber sword, they'd find a way to injure themselves with it.

Every type of flammable gas has to be treated with the necessary care and correct handling processes.

Allan seems to forget that he shares the road daily with hundreds of thousands of moving time bombs in the shape of LPG-fuelled vehicles. There's often a modest % of butane, in with the propane, in autogas.

How many of those vehicles have date-expired LPG tanks? Plenty, I'll wager! I know of a few!
How many date-expired LPG bottles are in current use?

There's no requirement to present LPG bottles on the day they expire for checking!
Thus, you're sharing roads, parks and campsites with time bombs galore!

I would hazard a guess, the biggest single problem is buying 2 stoves for $16, and expecting to get the finest engineered product around. You get what you pay for.

If users who never read instructions were banned from owning dangerous items, that would cut out 98% of the male 4WD population from owning anything dangerous!! LOL

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 13:17

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 13:17
I can't see anything wrong with Allan's post. He worked with gas and no doubt saw workplace videos that show what gas can do when not handled correctly. And he has a valid point.

It is up to us as individuals to weigh up these pro and against comments and choose our own path.

I really doubt that he has forgotten that gas is carried in cars and trucks. But you should remember that there are stringent standards that apply to cars and such like situations, unlike an almost casual approach to low pressure butane canisters. Even the word canister implies "simple and easy to . . . . ."!

A valid point from both. Thanks.

Phil
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Follow Up By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 16:19

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 16:19
Gday Allan
When camping i use the same setup, but when just driving i use a deadly black canister stove , mainly because i am on my own.
Muzbry
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 17:43

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 17:43
.
"Allan seems to forget....etc."??? No not at all.

Ron, when it comes to safety, Allan doesn't "forget" anything. To work in hazardous industries for as many years as I did and survive probably means I was doing something right.
The essential element of safe behaviour is to always minimise your risk. That does not mean that you can always totally eliminate risk, but you can minimise it and improve your odds of remaining safe.

To introduce expressions of there being "date-expired LPG bottles' on the road has nothing whatever to do with the subject anymore than there are Inland Taipans in the areas we travel and camp. To do so perhaps indicates that your argument in opposition is weak and idefensible. We are speaking of butane canister powered stoves, not getting run-over-by-a-bus etc.

Certainly you could have accidents with bottle & hose connected stoves or even with a wood-fueler campfire but my point of view is that these canister systems are manufactured down to a low price and rely on a complex safety device to protect the user from potential injury. Far better to have a robust design which is intrinsically safe, allowing of course for adequate maintenance. There is always opportunity for irresponsible maintenance or operation, but removing any potentially unsafe element or component improves your odds of not having an incident.

I my opinion, bottle & hose stoves, if well selected and maintained, are reasonably robust appliances unlikely to inflict injury.
Canister stoves on the other hand are cheap appliances of flimsy construction with tinplate fuel canisters containing a lot of energy. They have small margins of safety.

But, it is of course, only my opinion. Use whatever you like..... just don't expect me to come within 5 metres of it when lit.




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Allan

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 17:49

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 17:49
.
Phil,

Thank you for your supportive responses. Your Follow Up 865881 probably put my case as well, and shorter, than my response above.

Time to shake hands?
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Stephen F2 - Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 22:29

Wednesday, Mar 02, 2016 at 22:29
New butane canisters not blow up.I bought a huge carton of them
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 07:06

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 07:06
No decided which way to go yet,.

Do you know if the new canisters work on the "old" stoves?

Phil
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Reply By: Robin Miller - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 07:58

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 07:58
Its better to look at the problem from a different direction Phil.

Which other stove product is as safe - probably the worst is a normal gas bottle with its hose .

Robin Miller

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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 08:36

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 08:36
Hi Robin

I don't know if you are correct there. An oxyacetylene torch is dangerous as well. So is a hammer and so is a car. But if used and maintained properly then you could say that they are all safe. And I am wondering if it isn't the same with these ever so handy small stoves. However, I am willing to secede to the ministers wishes and sometimes, whims. Don't tell her I said that.

What is different with this one is that so far all I see is troubles if they are not used correctly. Just as a hammer can destroy a fingernail (ouch that bloody well hurts) etc etc.

I am yet to see or read anything that makes them dangerous when using them as designed or instructed.

And for the record, the cost is irrelevant!!

Phil
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Follow Up By: LandCoaster - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 15:31

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 15:31
I reckon the canister systems are far far far, beyond the horizon, safer...

If something goes wrong with a 4KG bottle there is enough gas to fill a stadium....

If something goes wrong with a 250 gram canister it is a lot less potential for a grave disaster
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 18:37

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 18:37
.
One significant point of difference is that 4kg LPG bottles are properly carried outside of the vehicle whereas it seems the norm that people carry cartons of butane cartridges within the vehicle.
250g of butane released from the cartridge can be quite a powerful explosion.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 18:40

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 18:40
Robin,
Why do you say that "probably the worst is a normal gas bottle with its hose" ?
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: LandCoaster - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 20:38

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 20:38
Hi Allan,,, just so I get the semantics correct (really have to do that here 8) "properly carried outside of the vehicle", does that include the 4kg bottles fitted into a gas cabinet, is that considered "properly carried outside of the vehicle"...
Im asking because, excluding caravans, Iv'e seen more gas cabinets than i've seen bottles out

Also, the kids filling my 4kg's at bcf had a nasty habit of overtightenning the overflow screw which detoriated the rubber seal on the screw leading to a tiny leak which barely sweat and is quite hard to diagnose without proper equipment
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 20:42

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 20:42
Couple of reasons Allan - leakage from hose is so common and dangerous that they run scary TV ads here about using soapy water around them, checking for leaks, before use.

Also I have been just a few meters from a butane stove when it blew up.
The characteristic of the explosion was quite similar to that of small hydrogen filled balloons.
(I worked with Radiosonde development around 1970's)

I.E. Lot of noise and big flash but not a lot of real energy.
The components of the stove separated into lightweight flimsy bits of sheet metal that didn't travel far.

Doesn't mean that they can't be dangerous , but in relative terms they impart less impact force.

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 23:13

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 23:13
Hi Landcoaster,

I should not have limited my expression to "4kg". All LPG bottles are safer carried outside the vehicle. There are some Rules about this. My use of the term "properly carried outside of the vehicle" is intended to mean "in accordance with appropriate Rules and good procedures". That would of course include LPG bottles carried and stored within cabinets or enclosures which are constructed and vented in accordance with industry and government prescriptions.

The very purpose of this method of ventilated storage is to overcome risk due to small leaks such as you describe. Incidentally, the bleed screw on LPG bottles has no "rubber seal". It has a metal-to-metal screw and seat. But yes, it can leak if damaged.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Stephen F2 - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 08:54

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 08:54
You know if you were normal naughty kid and threw a spray can into fire and wait till it explodes best with paint tin ha ha ha.Well the new Butane cans will not do this.They have safety valve.Big W sells them so I would think they would stop selling any items that are dangerous.I read about the articles on the dangers but still bought a stove and 36 Butane canisters.Better than hauling a gas cylinder around mucking about with hose and my wife reckons these little stoves cook fast and easy set up.You can buy double stove too. Only negative is more waste but in reality when camping in warmer climates dont do much cooking..Cold water most important..
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 09:11

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 09:11
Stephen, do you know if the new cans will work with the old stoves?

Phil
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Follow Up By: Stephen F2 - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 13:49

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 13:49
Should be able to use with old stove as many people have never read about the idiots blowing them up.So the mechanism for connecting should be same.Otherwise be written on canister not to be used with old models.If you are wary checkout Expedition Australia website has list of banned stoves in NSW.Its bit like the Shark attack frenzy lets kill all the Sharks .More people die walking accross the road...but if you want to spend 20 bucks or so just buy new stove with the new canisters to play it safe..
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Reply By: LandCoaster - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 12:16

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 12:16
Does anyone know what the real issue is?

A couple of years ago at Sunnybank some students where using one of these stoves inappropriately and it blew. The authorities made a fuss about the danger of them....

Undoubtedly the companies making the traditional burners made a bigger fuss about it being the amount of sales they where loosing, or perceived to be loosing...

Personally I think these are safer than a traditional set-up because there are far less failure points and far far easier to inspect those failure points...
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Reply By: cookie1 - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 13:43

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 13:43
I have owned quite a few of these units over the years and get rid of them when I visually deem them "used" they aren't that expensive and are very convenient. Personally I leave them in the cardboard casing until I need them as this is how they have been transported from overseas and around Australia so reckon that they should be good to travel.

Yep common sense goes a real long way and unfortunately as with most things the minority seem to have the authorities jumping at every incident & accident - who would have thought that using it with the trivet upside down or covering the gas bottle would cause an issue :)

The one & only serious incident that I have ever had with gas was with a new 3 burner gas stove hooked up to a 9kg bottle via a new hose, we were sat relaxing and suddenly we heard an almighty rush of wind - it was gas and after immediately turning off the 9kg bottle we found the new hose was ruptured and not near a join but pretty much in a free section of hose. The retailer replaced it after I threatened to call the ACCC & Technical Regulator as the sales rep reckoned that it wasn't a defect and not warrantable.

cheers
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Reply By: Iza B - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 14:06

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 14:06
The "real issue" according to the QLD government site I just read, is that the old models did not come with proper testing and certification of the canister safety release mechanism. The site specifically states the recall was prompted by the fact that some of the stoves had mechanisms that might not work in an over pressure situation. The misuse of the trivet and other operator error problems was/is not the real issue. The fixed trivet on the new models is intended to minimise one known method of operator error but oversize pans and a couple of other misuses are still possible. Authorities seem confident that a servicable auto release mechanism will save the fools who ignore safe use practices. The CRV feature now appearing on the canisters is nice to have but not necessary if the safety release mechanism is working.

Iza
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 14:31

Thursday, Mar 03, 2016 at 14:31
I think that mine have been tested long enough. Thanks Iza.

Phil
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Reply By: MEMBER Bushbum - Friday, Mar 04, 2016 at 15:58

Friday, Mar 04, 2016 at 15:58
Phil I have replaced my stoves but have also tried old cannisters in new stoves and new cannisters in old stoves. All work. My new stoves have the trivets ready to use and are actually held in place.with screws.Purchased a single and a double burner from Big W and had a look at a couple of camping stores and their prices for the double were more than double and minimum of $10 dearer for the single. I am like you in that I doubt there is really anything wrong with the original design that common sense could not fix.
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Friday, Mar 04, 2016 at 16:34

Friday, Mar 04, 2016 at 16:34
Thanks mate I prefer the loose trivet and the fact that if it isn't in place you can't turn the gas or nor even make it spark. We may stay with the old ones. Double burners are out for us because I like the way the single burner ones fit in the drawers.

Phil
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Mar 07, 2016 at 13:31

Monday, Mar 07, 2016 at 13:31
Found this item recently, Phil. Whether it's a "new" model or "old" I don't know?

Definitely pass on this one!



Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Monday, Mar 07, 2016 at 13:56

Monday, Mar 07, 2016 at 13:56
Sticking with the old stoves Bob.

They fit nicely side on in the front of the right hand drawer, with plenty of room for tools, spares and some recovery gear in the drawer as well. And then the whole left hand side drawer can still be kept for food and typical "kitchen" stuff.

The only heavy stuff is safely secured under a shelf that extends from the drawers to the rear of the drivers seat. The rest of the kit is bolted down and the only loose stuff is soft bags, towels etc and clothes. Meaning that we don't need a cargo barrier to the rear. I don't think that a pillow will hurt! Do you.

I mention all this because the car as described "works" for us and we can shower, dress, pack and get out of home in an hour or two. The biggest job is stacking the fridges and putting the roof top tent on the rack, and even that only takes me 20 minutes, while my wife stocks the fridges and puts the hose in the fresh water tank. Nothing like saying "Why don't we go for a drive today" and be gone before the pubic servant rush 5 minutes or by 8AM depending on how keen we are. Plans . . Stuff that - do it on the way.

Hence why I started this thread to weigh up the risks and see if we had to re-design our rear end layout!!!

Thanks mate

Phil

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Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Monday, Mar 07, 2016 at 15:31

Monday, Mar 07, 2016 at 15:31
Phil

I know what you're saying - nothing like having to rush the "pubic servant" LOL

I have what I call my 15 min camping schedule.


15 min to load the truck with gear check and fuel it
15 min to pack - including clothes/food/water etc

Then gone....

15 min to set up camp (rtt, awning and kitchen)
15 min to light fire and have a beer

Any longer and it isnt worth it.

Cheers

Anthony

VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

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FollowupID: 866111

Reply By: TomH - Monday, Mar 07, 2016 at 15:07

Monday, Mar 07, 2016 at 15:07
The ulimate question is. How much is a life worth.

These stoves cost about 5 beers.

They may have worked for 40 years, so they must be safe untill all of a sudden they arent.
So you are away on a trip and you take some friends along and one who has never used it before does it wrong and it blows up in their face and you are in the middle of the Simpson.
How would you feel. How would they feel screaming in pain till hopefully the chopper arrives. For the cost its better to be sure than sorry.

Also if they are banned insurance may rear its ugly head in the event of a claim of maybe your vehicle going up in flames ( worst case scenario I know).
AnswerID: 597117

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Monday, Mar 07, 2016 at 15:27

Monday, Mar 07, 2016 at 15:27
Not a problem. Come with us and you bring your own or you dip out and eat cold meals. That's one way of learning. Same with headlights. If people always tell you that you left your lights on, you won't learn and one day . . But Mummy no one told me that I had left them on Boohoo. Nothing like turning the key and nothing happens. It tends to scramble the "little grey cells" at first but then a lesson is learnt. Hopefully.

Interesting point about the insurance though.

Phil
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FollowupID: 866110

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