Changing tyre in bush

Submitted: Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 15:04
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Hi I like to carry 2nd spare but dam heavy to put on top of roof cage Already discussed on here how to do it but a hassle..How hard is to change a tyre on standard alloy rim.Cheers
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 15:12

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 15:12
Hi Lazylux16

We used to always take a complete spare rim, but because of the weight issue, now only take a spare good carcass.

Proving that you have a good quality air compressor, tyre levers, and bead breaker, it is an easy job and saves on a lot of weight. You will also need a. Good quality plug repair kit and most times that will get you out of trouble.

That's what we do and still gives the safety margin of 6 good tyres, even if you have to mount it yourself.


Cheers


Stephen
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 15:50

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 15:50
The other essential material to do a tyre change is a container of tyre lubricant.
You will never see a commercial changer who does not use liberal amounts.
It makes a HUGE difference and reduces bead damage.

Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 17:11

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 17:11
Hi Peter,

Res I should have mentioned that. I made up a mixture years ago of Lux Baby soap and boiled the mix up with water, to male a perfect white paste and use an old pair brush to give a good liberal coating of soap and the tyre goes on like a treat.

I was given this recipe from a tyre dealer years ago and is safe enough to use on steel rims, and will not rust them, and and is no issues with alloy rims. Over the years the mix has thickened up, so just add more water and give a good shake up and the container is full again.


Cheers



Stephen
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 17:52

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 17:52
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I use Lux soap flakes too Stephen but carry them dry and mix a little when needed.
My philosophy is that I will never need them..... LOL

Lux flakes are getting a bit hard to find these days.
There are proprietary lubricants, but hell, who wants to buy and carry 5 litres of the stuff?
Cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 18:04

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 18:04
Hi Allan

I have mine made up in a one litre Decor container that is with my tyre changing kit. When you have to use it, it goes a very long way.




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Stephen
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 18:12

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 18:12
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"One litre"?? Geez Stephen, I'll travel behind you any time! lol
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Allan

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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 06:20

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 06:20
Lux saop flakes are good, a multi purpose item as you can give your hands a quick wash with the mix too.
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Reply By: Malcom M - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 16:52

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 16:52
Harder than steel rims.
Have you honed your skills and actually changed a tyre by hand?
Pretty hard work even if you have the tools with you (do you have the tools?). I occasionally change mine by hand but then I spent my teenage years in a tyre shop that did not have the automated gear that they do now (40 years ago) so know what to do.
If you've never changed a tyre by hand then find out how before you consider anything else. Stranded in bush is not a good time to start practising on your only good carcass.
Having said that, its easy to mash the rim edge on the alloy rim. Not structural but it'll never look the same again. Not much more difficult than a steely.

Do you have a winch? You can always rig up a pulley and haul the wheel onto the roof rack.
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 17:46

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 17:46
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Despite what some may have you believe, it is not really easy to remove and replace a large 4WD tyre on a alloy rim. Depends somewhat on your mechanical skills and experience.

For a start, as Malcolm said, "its easy to mash the rim edge on the alloy rim".
And as Stephen said, you will need "a good quality air compressor, tyre levers, and bead breaker". I would add to that, tyre lubricant and a heavy rubber mallet.
By the time you carry all those tools you may as well carry a complete spare wheel & tyre, especially as the alloy is lighter than steel.

Malcolm has described some of the difficulties but has omitted something that can be problematic if the tyre is tubeless. i.e. the difficulty in reseating the tyre over the bead by compressed air. Unless the tyre is forming a leak-proof seal against the rim (difficult), it will be impossible to raise the pressure sufficiently to force it over the bead. There are ways to achieve this but more skills are required. Of course, a tube can be fitted but then it somewhat defeats the purpose of tubeless alloys!
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 18:32

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 18:32
"By the time you carry all those tools you may as well carry a complete spare wheel & tyre, especially as the alloy is lighter than steel."

Yes, the weight of the tools certainly adds up, Allan. But those of us with ageing, weak and damaged shoulders (me) can at least put a spare carcass on a roof rack and take it down. I don't think I could heft even an alloy with rubber up and down from there.

For obstinate re-seating of beads - well I looked at Mick O's method which he posted in one of his blogs, I think. If what the R&R Beadbreaker website(link) says fails, then Mick's can of butane and a match should do the trick.

If you get your quantities right and have a valve in the stem, you might not even have to pump it up:-) !!!!!

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 19:02

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 19:02
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Hi Frank,

Well, I think that I have a few years up on you so I devised a means of getting the spare wheel up onto the roof rack without gaining a hernia. I made up a simple 3x block & tackle with yachting pulleys and rope. Makes it quite easy to pull the spare up. Getting it down is even easier, well sometimes..... depends on where it bounces!

I avoided the cost, bulk and weight of bead breakers by making a small device that fits on the bottom of my jack. Just lay the wheel under the towbar and the jack simply pushes the bead off. Perfect!

But reseating? I dunno about Mick's butane method. I value my eyebrows!
I do have a trick there also. A special hose & connectors from a good tyre @ 60psi to the repair job and the rapid inflation does the job as well as a tyre shop. A ratchet strap around the tyre perimeter helps too.

Why do I bother with all this stuff? Well I am applying Murphy's Law. If I carry it, I won't need it. LOl
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 10:00

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 10:00
Thanks Allan. Until now I've carried a second complete spare on the roof, but recent injury has made this impractical. I can't hang one off the back of the canopy, so it has to be a carcass on the roof which I think I can manage and learn how to do a tyre change or a method of hoisting a complete wheel up and down.

Your hints and others here will help me decide.

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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 12:36

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 12:36
Frank
I carry those tools anyway.

Would think you have a compressor on board?
Most tourers have dish washing fluid.
3 or 4 small pry bars is what I use on my OEM rims. They have a multitude of uses.

All that is part of my general kit so changing a tyre is catered for (but not looked forward to)

I break the bead by driving over the edge of the tyre or use the Hi-Lift if its with me.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 13:38

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 13:38
Thanks Malcolm M

Yes, I have the soap, a 120 lpm tyre inflator, plug kit, package of consumables for carcass and tube repairs. I've not used the last because until now plugs and a full second spare have done the job and got me to a tyre repair place.

But now I think I have to commit to a spare carcass on the roof and a means of changing tyres if necessary.

I was leaning toward an R&R Beadbreaker kit with levers, etc. Easy to use with a crook shoulder, I think, but I'm conscious of the weight. On the other hand, not carrying a sixth rim would offset most or all of the weight, I would think.

This topic has been a good and educational read. Though I'm not the OP, thanks to everyone.

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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 14:29

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 14:29
Frank

**** On the other hand, not carrying a sixth rim would offset most or all of the weight, I would think. ****

certainly would if its a Toyota :)
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 20:16

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 20:16
I've gone for the R&R too. Looks to be the smartest way out of the problem. Now to spend an arvo practising!
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Reply By: 671 - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 18:25

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 18:25
How hard is to change a tyre on standard alloy rim

-------------------------------------------------

The only way you are going to find the answer to that question is to get someone who really does know what they are doing to show you how then you have a go yourself.

I changed a 235/85 x 16 on a steel rim yesterday without any problems but I used to change tyres by hand many years ago at work. I could tell you it is easy but I could be lulling you into a false sense of security.
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Reply By: Member - Outback Gazz - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 18:25

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 18:25
Howdy

Some good info about tyre changing in thread 91788 - especially "Outnabout's" reply about placement of tyre lube - get this right and the job is very easy !

I carry a vegemite jar of tyre slip I got from my tyre store.


Happy and safe, puncture free travelling


Cheers

Gazz

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Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 19:37

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 19:37
Lazylux16 - The two greatest obstacles as regards tyre-changing, is breaking the bead initially, and getting it to re-seat again.

The trick with bead breaking is to carry a 700mm length of solid-grain, 100x50 or 100x75 hardwood.
You place the flat tyre on solid ground in front of the front wheel (valve up), and place the length of hardwood right up level with the edge of the rim, at right angles to it, right in line with the valve.

This makes a simple ramp that you then drive up on, to break the bead (after you've deflated the tyre of course!).
This neat trick is one shown me by an old hand, over 40 yrs ago, and it never fails to work.
If the bead is really stubborn, you may need to back off the hardwood and turn the tyre and rim a little, and drive up it again.

Once the bead is pulled away from one side, turn the wheel over and do the other side the same.
It is crucial that the end of the piece of hardwood is as close to the edge of the rim as you can get, so it gets maximum bead-breaking effect. If it's back even 20 or 25mm, the bead-breaking effect is lost.

For re-seating beads, a length of tie-wire run around the centre of the tread and twitched up - or a heavy ratchet strap tightened in the same position, often works to spring the bead out enough to hold the air.
It's also important to remove the valve core and apply a copious amount of air through the valve stem to promote bead seating.
For this, you need a valve stem connection with no restrictions, to allow maximum air transfer to the tyre.

It pays to practice before you leave so you know what works, and what doesn't.

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 21:18

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 21:18
Gday Ron,
That strap used to be great for crossply tyres. But have to say I find it is of limited benefit with steel radials - the tread tends to buckle as you tighten the strap before the bead can spread sideways.
A whoose of air is often the trick and like you say valves need to be removed. But every vehicle has at least 4 other air tanks - one on each corner - I have a modified air line that uses an ARB deflator to remove the valve of a good tyre inflated to 60+ psi - provides plenty of whoosh to reseat beads without blowing everybody up!
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 21:39

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 21:39
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The ratchet strap works for me Phil. Don't know why, but it does.

I too have a short airline with valve remover. Works a treat.
Thought it was my original idea! Life's full of disappointments.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 23:33

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 23:33
My bead breaker - 10mm aluminium. Never failed.



I have used a variety of methods to re seal, including the explosion (worked well, but harder to get the explosion than you think), the ratchet strap and the max air delivery (while rotating the tyre back and forth on the rim which is mounted on the vehicle), a tube of silicone liberally deposited all around the bead (not my tyre thank goodness) and an appropriately sized bicycle tube, selected and carried for the purpose.

This is a hose connection to allow 2 tyres to be connected together.
I run my spares at higher pressure than they are used at to store some air. It does not weigh much....



Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 23:50

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 23:50
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Peter, my bead breaker is almost identical. Couldn't find the photo.
Mine attaches to the jack with a couple of studs & nuts.
As you say, never fails.

Interesting that you have a double-extension jack too. They are not common but are invaluable.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 00:19

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 00:19
Haha - seems like we all have the same original ideas!!
The jack under the towbar trick I first used in 1977 when we took a Corolla up the Birdsville and Oodnadatta tracks. It was a scissor jack back then and used a old tyre pump to reinflate them tubeless if we could.


But later used the Bottle jack and square hitch:
http://www.lcool.org/technical/90_series/bead_breaker/bead_breaker.html

Here's my version of the hose: ARB deflator hooks up to the full tyre, T-junction allows additional air from the compressor, coupling allows it go back to being a deflator, and valve clip has been drilled out to allow high flow with valve removed:
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 10:26

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 10:26
Hey Phil,
Birdsville Track in 1977-?? Geez, it must have been as rough as the two characters in your pic. Poor bloody Corolla!

I saw the towbar adaptor on LCOOL some time back but I have found that my jack was stable enough under the towbar with the jack base directly onto the tyre. My point of difference was the addition of the 'blade' as per Peter's. If my bottle jack is in use under the axle I can fit the blade to my Hi-lift and use that on the tyre.

My hose is as yours without the "tee". The 'deflator' was modified for increased airflow.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 10:53

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 10:53
Those 2 guys were normal guys before that trip :-) They were uni mates and we still keep in touch.
Your blade is a good mod because it stops the tread of the tyre being creased by the jack.
Wish I still had the corolla wagon! Sold it in 1979 and bought a 2A LandRover :-(
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 21:09

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 21:09
If you carry a spare casing, the biggest mistake is to tie it down on the roofrack. If you do so, the beads will be squashed together and when you fit the tyre as a tubeless tyre you'll have huge problems trying to get the beads to seat against the rim. This can be overcome by fitting an inflated tube inside the tyre when you travel - keeps the tyre in better shape. Ever wondered why tyre shops store tyres upright on racks?

Alloys are no different than steel to fit. It is easiest after a fair deal of practice. I've used the plastic rim protectors on alloys and they seem to prevent scratching OK. Bead breakers can scratch rims badly which is why I wrote up my original car jack bead breaker, although I admit these days I just get the high lift jack out if handy. That way there is no contact with the rim.

f you are just repairing a leak, then only lever one bead which is all you need to apply a patch. The only reason to completely remove a tyre is if its too badly damaged and you are replacing it. Chances are that this can be done by someone else in a remote location if you don't know how to do it.

I must also admit that these days I only ever seem to repair other peoples tyres in the groups we travel with. If you do all the right things, punctures are less common than they used to be. But when remote I still like the 2nd spare as one destroyed tyre will leave you very worried.

There are lots of other tricks.
Lubricate the beads as you remove the tyre too - the tyre comes off easier and you are less likely to distort the bead.
I just use detergent in water - doesn't work as well as lux flakes because it dries quick - so its OK if you are quick and its less likely that your bead will come off the rim at low pressures or that your tyre will lose balance by spinning on the rim.
And finally tyre plugs are the answer to most punctures in remote areas. But they too have a learning curve - make sure you explore the hole and remove every skerrick of stick or rock in the hole - if you don't then the plug won't seal. I always use glue with plugs - the blue special cement is usually best - seals better on the sidewalls.
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Follow Up By: Bob R4 - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 22:16

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 22:16
If you find that you have a simple puncture such as a nail or stake (should you be so lucky), in many cases you can plug it from the outside without breaking the bead or removing the tyre from the rim.
When it comes to reseating the tyre on the rim, I've found ratchet straps or the like are pretty useless with steel belted radials, and using a specially made hose to get the first inrush of air to seal the bead is the best option. A hose fitting which can be locked to the receiving valve, or if lucky, having someone to hold it in place while you remove the valve from a fully or preferably over-inflated (say 60psi) tyre, and jamb the hose onto the valve stem will do the trick most times.
If you have help, a larger bore hose which will seal when held on the stem with the assistance of an extra pair of hands coupled with a liberal dose of lubricant to the bead and rim will also assist with the initial seal. Even some water will also help in the absence of any lubricant, as slowing the escape of air in the initial stage can be all that is needed. The larger the hose the better will be the initial pressure transfer.
12v compressors are virtually useless for the re-seating stage, but can be used to increase the pressure in your slave tyre.
Of good use is a small tarp, tabletop, or the like to keep everything away from the dirt.
After all that, the single most important suggestion I can offer is to practice it at home when it doesn't involve any urgency. The roadside is not the place to practice, particularly as you don't get to choose the time, place, nor weather conditions, but when the need arises you have a fair idea of what to do.

Bob
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Reply By: 671 - Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 23:16

Sunday, Mar 27, 2016 at 23:16
There has been a few suggestions so far for reseating the bead. There is another method that I used successfully at work over forty years. It also worked yesterday on that 235/85 that I mentioned earlier..

Lay the wheel on flat ground with the inside down then push down hard with your feet on the outside. You are pushing the outer bead down onto the inner bead. This can often partially seat the inner bead. Stand the wheel up gently and lean it on an angle against a wall or another wheel on the car. Gently push the wheel into the tyre with your knee while you put air into it. If you push too hard you may unseat the inner bead.

This can lightly seat the outer bead allowing the air to build up pressure and take over.
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Reply By: Motherhen - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 00:07

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 00:07
We now carry the second spare as tyre only, and purchased a set of tyre pliers. These have not been used so I cannot say how difficult they would be, but they would have to beat the previous method of having me drive backwards and forwards over the tyre.

Peter n Margaret's idea looks easier.

Motherhen

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Reply By: Member - Odog - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 08:36

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 08:36
No offence to anyone, but, by the time you pack your tyre levers/plyers, your tub of lube, your special air hose, and the adaptor for your jack or bit of 4x2 hardwood.. Any weight gain, or advantage would be minimal, compared to an alloy rim.. Not to even bring the effort, and convenience into the mix, of having the complete spare.. Maybe only a few kilos in it.. My thoughts anyway.. Odog
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 12:42

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 12:42
Yeah but sometimes you can go through all your spares and need to get a carcass off to try and salvage something that will roll.
Hasn't happened to me but a mate punctured a tyre and then shreaded his two spares within 20Km. He was on his own so had to wait for a passing truck with the same stud pattern so as to borrow a wheel.

About then I'd be pulling off a carcass to see what I could fix up.
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 20:26

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 20:26
Yep. The first time I took my Forester seriously out bush two sidewalls got staked within a kilometre.
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Reply By: Member - ACD 1 - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 12:02

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 12:02
If you decide to go the carcass only route...

... grab a tube that fits your tyre, insert into carcass and inflate.

It doesn't add much weight, but it will stop your carcass getting crap and dust in it that will tip out all over you when you lift it down.

BTW! I use a combination of tyre players and the Jack under the tow hitch. It was nigh on impossible to change a tyre out when I started, but it takes practice...lots of practice (which is best done before your trip).

Cheers

Anthony
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Reply By: Michael H9 - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 14:45

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 14:45
If I was going to use the drive over the tyre method to break the bead then I'd have to take a whole other car with me because mine would be up on the jack. :-)
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Reply By: Sigmund - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 20:29

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 20:29
Going alloy rather than steel makes quite a difference to the weight of a spare. Any margin helps to keep us old farts out there.
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Reply By: Idler Chris - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 22:21

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 22:21
I have Federal Couragia M/T 267/75R16 tyres. My tyre shop tells me that even with my 750mm tyre irons I would have no hope of getting these tyres off a rim, let alone on a rim, on the side of the road. Even with all his equipment he had difficulty in getting these tyres on the rim and getting them to seat they are so heavy in the sidewalls. His advice just take a plug kit.
Tyres will vary depending on sidewall strength. The easier to mount and de-mount tyres are likely to be softer in the sidewalls so more prone to puncture. The stronger they are the harder they will be to mount, or de-mount, but will be less prone to puncture.
I have a D-Max and my first spare which is a Federal to match the others and is stored behind the passenger seat. The second spare is the original spare mounted under the tray which I also use as an airtank. Additionally I have internal Sensatyre tyre monitors for safety reasons, this gives an additional benefit in that it greatly reduces the chances of destroying a tyre by it deflating and you not knowing about it until its to late.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 23:19

Monday, Mar 28, 2016 at 23:19
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Hi Chris,

You say ....."The easier to mount and de-mount tyres are likely to be softer in the sidewalls so more prone to puncture. The stronger they are the harder they will be to mount, or de-mount, but will be less prone to puncture."......
There can be no doubt about that Chris.

I guess you are saying that you have no intentions of tyre changing on the track. So why do you have "750mm tyre irons"? Or are they a past legacy? Do you follow your tyre shop's advice and only carry a plug kit?

I don't have your tough Federal Couragia tyres but the several punctures I have incurred over the past few years have all been on bitumen so I am coming around to rethinking the carrying of all my tyre repair paraphernalia and inner tubes. It would save on weight and space. If I should suffer a puncture that could not be repaired with the plug kit then I could continue with increased care until safe. Is that your philosophy Chris?
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Allan

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Follow Up By: Idler Chris - Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 11:26

Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 11:26
Hi Allan,

I use to carry an R&R Beadbreaker plus two 750mm tyre irons. In ten years, and 250,000 k's with 70% off road, I used them three times on the track. As I had two full spares I did not need to carry out any repairs to keep going, I only changed them in case I should get another puncture before I got to civilization again. As these Federal tyres are much stronger I will just carry a patch kit. I see the odds of getting two punctures which cannot be plugged on a par with an alternator or starer motor failure for which I do not carry spares.
As for punctures on bitumen. See plenty of them, the inventor of tech screws has a lot to answer for. Getting a heavy 4WD tyre off/on a rim is a real PITA and to be avoided at all costs. If you are on bitumen then a professional tyre repair place has to reachable. IMHO if you are on bitumen the most you need is a plug kit.
Apart from two full spares, I also carry a PLB, a Spot tracker, a satphone, a healthy credit card, and enough provisions for several weeks, I think I have all bases covered.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 11:55

Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 11:55
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Thanks Chris,

You are reinforcing my thinking about discarding the tyre repair gear (other than the plug kit) and just carry the 2nd full spare. I dumped the Hi-Lift jack on the last trip too.

As you say, the odds are similar to a starter or alternator failure, or other critical component. The satphone and a well stocked credit card and tucker box should cover worst-case events. If one spare cannot be repaired then just drive very carefully to civilisation.
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Allan

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Follow Up By: Idler Chris - Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 12:19

Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 12:19
Thanks Allan, Great minds think alike.
Cheers,
Chris

PS My Hi-Lift jack has been in the garage for the last eight years.
What other people think of me is none of my business.
Do unto others what you would have them do unto you.

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1
FollowupID: 867122

Reply By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Tuesday, Mar 29, 2016 at 14:10

Tuesday, Mar 29, 2016 at 14:10
Sort of on topic - possibly think of one of these if you have the space to mount it...

Obieco wheel carrier - you can pivot and lift with one arm....

AnswerID: 597905

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