Tuesday 17th October 2017 - Be Part of History

Submitted: Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 18:48
ThreadID: 131983 Views:2053 Replies:4 FollowUps:7
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Good Evening fellow EO Members

Would you like to be part of a very important historical event on the 17th October 2017?

So you want to hear more?

Well I have contacts with a very small group of people and it is now time to share this very important event.

0n the 17th October 2017, it will be 100 years since the joining of the Rails just west of Ooldea on the Trans Continental Railway Line.

In the peak of World War I, teams working from the west and well as the east completed this very important link that joined the west and the east for the first time ever. Prior to the new railway, the only way to reach Western Australia from South Australia, was the long sea voyage, or across what can be describe as a goat track.

In 1967 to mark the 50th Anniversary, a small group of locals and officials carried out a special ceremony at the exact time the the two rails were joined.

What I can officially tell you is the there will be an unveiling of a new Memorial made of steel that will not rot away like the now pile of plywood now at the site.

There is still a lot of work to be undertaken, but in the meantime, keep this date free to be part of this special historical event.



Cheers



Stephen
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Reply By: Ozrover - Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 19:10

Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 19:10
Good news Stephen, I'll be in if it doesn't conflict with a CSR trip I'm going on next year.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 19:57

Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 19:57
Hi Jeff

That would be great and the west coast is always a great place to visit.

I will keep everyone updated, but the more advanced notice we can give will help all to plan that far in advance.



Cheers



Stephen
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 19:18

Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 19:18
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Thanks Stephen, We will see if we can work that date into next year's trekking.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 19:58

Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 19:58
Hi Allan and Roz

It would be great to catch up again and to be there on that special day will be another great adventure.



Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 20:29

Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 20:29
Gday Stephen
I just told Darling i wont be home for my birthday party next year.
Muzbry
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 21:00

Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 at 21:00
Hi Muzbry

How did that go down....lol

I know one way around that, bring your Darling with you.


Cheers



Stephen
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Reply By: Ron N - Friday, Apr 01, 2016 at 02:02

Friday, Apr 01, 2016 at 02:02
Stephen, are you going to bring the silver-plated hammer and dog spike to carry out a re-enactment of the joining of the Trans Australian Railway, rails? [;-)

Here's some interesting snippets about the TAR construction ....

1. The TAR had a hospital car. The photos indicate that there would have been only some very basic medical treatment carried out in it!

2. There were also other construction railcars that held offices such as engineers office and paymasters office.

3. Initially, four Baldwin Locomotives were ordered from New York by the Commonwealth Railways of Australia, for the TAR in January 1913 - primarily for speed of delivery - but political pressure to "buy Australian", resulted in the Baldwin order being cancelled, and Clyde Engineering of NSW, supplying the first four, G-class locos.

Later on, with Clyde under great pressure, construction of more G-class locos was undertaken by the Toowoomba Foundry.
However, a wartime dearth of labour and other demands on TF, meant that a major portion of the construction of the next lot of G-class locos, was carried out by the Queensland Railway workshops at Ipswich.

3. Two of the first four standard-gauge G-class locomotives initially built by Clyde in NSW, were sent by ship to Fremantle - then railed to Kalgoorlie from Perth in Completely-Knocked-Down form, to be assembled in Kalgoorlie, for use on the TAR.

Standard gauge rail trucks and carriages were also sent up from Perth and assembled in Kalgoorlie (Parkeston, actually).
In March 1914, two more of the next four G-class locos - that had been re-ordered from Baldwin to speed up loco delivery - were landed at Fremantle and railed to Kalgoorlie for assembly.
The entire interesting story of the early TAR locomotives is in the bottom link below.

4. For the first few years of operation, the G-class locos weren't fitted with any headlights! Could you imagine being an engine driver, ploughing through the night in complete darkness??

5. Camels provided a large part of the animal power in the line construction - to carry water and other supplies out to the furtherest-forward workers - to carry out railway embankment and cutting earthworks by pulling simple earth scoops - to digging dams for water for the steam trains, also using the earth scoops.

6. The rail line was laid on the bare finished earthworks, with no ballast! The TAR line wasn't ballasted until 1940!

7. There was a pretty swish-looking 1914 Studebaker used as a railmotor inspection vehicle!

8. An early and very rare, McDonald "oil engine tractor" was used to clear the scrub from the path of the railway alignment. One early photo shows this tractor being repaired, with a rear wheel removed.
This tractor was essentially just a large rectangular frame with a large horizontal oil-engine installed in the frame, driving the large rear wheels via a simple single-gear reduction.

The first link below, is to a blokes early Australian railway photos on Flickr.

There's some fabulous photos there - and I don't know where he got them all from!

The photos range from before WW1, up to the 1970's - and they show the TAR, the Central Australian Railway, and the North Australian Railway as well.

There's pics of some amazing washouts, and train accidents, and line repairs.

I haven't gone through them all yet - there's hundreds of them! - but starting from the first pic in the link below, and scrolling right, yields a few dozen early photos of the TAR construction - including a pic of the original tracklayer!

Early Australian Railway photos

The Commonwealth Railways early standard gauge G-class locos story

Quite a number of early photos of the TAR show a movie camera taking photos of the train, and also mounted on the front of the loco for filming.
I wonder if any of those early movies of the TAR have survived?

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 598047

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Friday, Apr 01, 2016 at 05:38

Friday, Apr 01, 2016 at 05:38
Re No.4, Ron. Think of the adrenaline rush at full noise though!

Maybe they only travelled on moonlit nights? :-)

Thanks,
Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Paul E6 - Friday, Apr 01, 2016 at 07:12

Friday, Apr 01, 2016 at 07:12
That hospital car is huge!looks like a shearing shed!
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Friday, Apr 01, 2016 at 11:07

Friday, Apr 01, 2016 at 11:07
I have to confess that I didn't do enough research and checking on the "1914" Studebaker, Motor Inspection Car - because it's NOT a 1914 model at all - it's a 1927 Studebaker.
I was initially suspicious that the Studey looked a little too "modern" for 1914, and further research proved me right.

Regardless, it would have been a very comfortable inspection car, as compared to the "Quads" and the other basic rail inspection motors!

1927 Studebaker Motor Inspection Car

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Friday, Apr 01, 2016 at 22:41

Friday, Apr 01, 2016 at 22:41
Hi Ron


Thanks for the great piece of history.


Cheers


Stephen
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