Carrying stuff on roofracks

Submitted: Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 09:57
ThreadID: 132177 Views:2665 Replies:14 FollowUps:18
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I carry the normal stuff, chairs,boxes gas bottle etc and have been strapping all down with quality ocky straps. Anyone else using them or other forms of straps? What is best? Johno
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Reply By: Baz - The Landy - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 10:23

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 10:23
Quality ratchet straps for me!


Cheers, Baz - The Landy
AnswerID: 598871

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 10:32

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 10:32
X 2 for ratchet straps!

Ocky straps, even good quality ones, are like the proverbial piece of string. They can be as long, or as short as you want them to be. Ditto with tension of same.

A gas cylinder coming off a roof rack, at highway speeds, is a deadly projectile! Get some good ratchet straps, and travel with no worries..........well, no expensive legal ones anyway.

Bob

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Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Member - John - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 10:40

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 10:40
x 3 ............
John and Jan

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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 12:41

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 12:41
X 4 ......
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Follow Up By: Member - J&A&KK - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 22:59

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 22:59
X5

Ocky straps are a high power elastic band. They can be useful for keeping things tidy in the shed but of no use whatsoever for securing a load. Have a look at how the hooks are secured to the elastic. Ugh.

If you don't want straps then use high quality rope and appropriate knots such as the sheepshank.

Having been hit 3x by "stuff" coming adrift from roof racks and tray tops I am now really wary of what is "on top and in front" of me. Absolutely amazes me what you see on a roof rack and how often it is poorly secured. I had the front right hand wheel (tyre, rim & hub) taken off by a 50 kg piece of slate on a UK B road at 60mph. It was only very good fortune that we didn't hit one of the cars following the tractor/trailer that dropped the rock. Not nice trying to steer a 3 wheeler when it should have 4 and the one that's gone is one that's supposed to steer.

Anything on a roof rack is a potential projectile. One needs to consider what may occur when the unusual happens.
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Thursday, Apr 21, 2016 at 07:23

Thursday, Apr 21, 2016 at 07:23
No, no, no, we've all got it wrong!

A flapping grey tarp is ALL you need to keep your gear safely secured on the roof rack. It must be true, as I've seen it many, many times.

Bob

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Can't remember most of it.

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Reply By: The Explorer - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 10:26

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 10:26
Hello

I use ROK Straps for relatively light/low lying gear.

Have had a pair for a number of years and purchased another just recently. Can not say if they are the "best" but certainly very good quality and work well on my Rhino Rack Alloy Tray (i.e. lots of hook points).

Use racket straps for heavier/bigger stuff.

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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AnswerID: 598872

Reply By: wizzer73 - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 11:27

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 11:27
As a motorcyclist as well as a 4wder, i have seen my fair share of crap on the road that has come from roof racks and trailers. Tents, chairs, ladders, fishing rods, construction stuff, furniture etc. If a motorcyclist has there front wheel taken out from them, they will almost certainly crash and maybe die if they hit something else.
Please tie eveything down with quality straps. Wont hurt anyone and you'll still have your gear when you need it.

Cheers
Wizzer
AnswerID: 598874

Follow Up By: mountainman - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 11:58

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 11:58
Dont forget about the truck tyres that blow out.
And dead road kill
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Reply By: Sigmund - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 12:10

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 12:10
For lighter stuff I use camlock straps. Good for up to a wheel in weight (using two of them). Look at the load rating on the pack before you buy.
AnswerID: 598876

Follow Up By: Sigmund - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 12:13

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 12:13
There are some good quality Okky straps available with low stretch cord and heavy steel hooks. The ones with adjustable position hooks are the only ones I use, given the drawbacks already mentioned.
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Reply By: gbc - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 12:37

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 12:37
Get a rack bag. Fit more stuff, don't have to tie everything down individually, and it all stays dust free.
Seriously the best thing.
Mine's an old canvas one with torneau straps and torneau buttons on the roof basket to match. Since then they have invented rhino/MSA/etc bags.
AnswerID: 598877

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 16:48

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 16:48
Until an overhanging tree branch ripped the whole bag off.
Yes, it did happen!
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: gbc - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 17:51

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 17:51
I believe that is commonly referred to as an accident. If mine got hit the integrated webbing straps tying it down would rip the roof racks off without doubt.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 17:58

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 17:58
Well it certainly wasn't an intended act, gbc!!

It was not a cheap bag and the integrated straps held but tore from the bag.
Maybe your roof rack is not as well attached as mine? lol
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: gbc - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 18:13

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 18:13
Yeah mine is just those track mounted rhino racks. I think the pop riveted track would rip clean out of the roof!
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Reply By: Nargun51 - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 13:14

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 13:14
Back in the dim dark ages, I carried a windsurfer on a roof rack well tied down with good ocky straps. No problems going down to the Bay at suburban speeds, but the first time I was on the open road at highway speeds and seeing the bow of it move up and down about 30 cm after being buffeted by trucks, I ditched the ocky straps in favour of ratchet webbing straps.
Have seen 3 lengths of 4 metre lengths of guttering move out of ocky straps and score the bonnet of a plumber's ute when he decided at the last moment that he shouldn't run the amber (signed camera) and hit the brakes very hard.
You could be pinged for having an unsecured (insufficiently) secured load if somebody felt so inclined, you can always go to Court and argue that an ocky strap is sufficiently rated to hold a 9 kilo gas bottle in an emergency stop.
I know there was a death recently in Victoria recently, but I couldn't find a reference on a quick google search, but this one in Tasmania did:
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-12-09/north-west-tasmanian-man-avoids-jail-for-negligent-driving/7014488
AnswerID: 598879

Reply By: Member - mechpete - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 13:36

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 13:36
is there such a thing as a good ocky strap
mechpete
AnswerID: 598880

Reply By: ian.g - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 13:40

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 13:40
A number of years ago the car I was driving was hit by a 44 gallon drum that fell off the back of a truck (hadn't been tied on properly). Just about destroyed the vehicle (Falcon Sedan) caught it on lip of the bonnet on the first bounce and on the top of the windscreen on the second, all but removed the roof of the car and ended up in the back seat. I was very lucky that it was empty or I'm sure it would have killed me, had no passengers or they would have been dead. So please be certin that whatever you carry on the roof of vehicles is secured properly and that means good quality ratchet straps.I still have nightmares about that day.
AnswerID: 598881

Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 13:51

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 13:51
Similar story. I was on a motor bike behind a tradie's truck with a sheet of gal roofing on the rack. Whatever tie-down he had let go and that sheet of iron got airborne and just missed me. Could have been sliced in two. Yuk. I still think about it.
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Reply By: Gundarooster - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 14:01

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 14:01
Guys,

A couple of days ago on Lachlan Valley Way near Boorowa, some stuff came off a trailer and went thru the windscreen of a ute, the driver was killed and his passenger is in hospital in critical condition. The driver of the vehicle who lost the stuff off his trailer has been charged with Neg Driving Occasioning death and having an unsecured load.

So I strongly suggest that an occy strap is not suitable for holding down anything more than an object which you would be happy to be struck in the face with at 200km per hour (closing speed).

Best you over engineer this solution than the alternative.

Gazza
AnswerID: 598882

Follow Up By: LAZYLUX16 - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 16:24

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 16:24
Hi Gazza not nice
My brothers gf got hit by flying tyre and died .So I am planning to put spare wheel on roofrack will ratchet straps be ok .Or better bolting wheel to roofrack somehow cheers
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FollowupID: 868052

Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 16:37

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 16:37
LazyLux

Check the following link, these will suffice, I use one attached to eye-bolts on the roof-rack (when required).

Rhino-Rack is one brand, but I am sure there are others, just buy reputable and quality!

Spare wheel tie down

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
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Follow Up By: Gundarooster - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 17:37

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 17:37
BTW the "Stuff" that fell off the trailer was an escavator bucket and the ute that hit it was following behind. I assume it bounced and came in thru the windscreen? The accident was attended by the RFS so I'll hear the full details in a day or so.

Gazza
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Reply By: LAZYLUX16 - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 16:26

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 16:26
Buy cheap.canvas bag .I seen some for 50 bucks online just google 4wd stuff
AnswerID: 598885

Reply By: Ron N - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 17:17

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 17:17
Occy straps are next to useless for load restraint and should be avoided at all costs.

Use a cargo net and ratchet straps that meet Australian Load Restraint standard AS/NZS 4380:2001 - because the law now states that the only restraints permitted for loads on vehicles, are those that meet that standard.

It has been bandied around that rope is no longer acceptable as a load restraint method.
This opinion is incorrect - you may use rope, provided it meets the AS/NZS 4380:2001 standard.

I might add that large numbers of retailers are selling ratchet straps that do not meet AS/NZS 4380:2001, and do not have a stitched label or indelible marking stating that they do.
If you find the ratchet strap or other restraint you are buying has no AS/NZS 4380:2001 markings, then that restraint is not legal for use on a road vehicle.

The National Load Restraint Guide 2004 - despite being aimed largely at commercial vehicles - gives good guidance as to satisfactory restraint methods.

National Load Restraint Guide

IMO, the Load Restraint Guide needs additional sections specifically covering roof rack loads and their restraint, because stuff falling off roof racks is a regular feature of road travel news, nearly every week.

Most people fail to understand the enormous forces placed on items on roof racks via being buffeted by 110kmh winds - which is precisely what is happening above your head at highway speeds.

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 598894

Reply By: Ron N - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 17:27

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 17:27
Here's one bloke who thought that secure load laws only applied to other road users!

W.A. driver caught carrying goat on pallet wired to trailer drawbar

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 598897

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 18:02

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 18:02
Ha ha, Ron. That's probably Garry(the goat) :-)

Bob

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Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Life Member - Duncan W (WA) - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 19:36

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 19:36
Bit over engineered for Bridgetown don't you think Ron.
Dunc
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Reply By: Member - Trevor_H - Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 20:19

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 at 20:19
After having a load come loose and the hooks dislodging on corrugations with ratchet straps, I resolved to only use cam locks so that the load is secured with a continuous loop.
On my hard floor camper trailer I had dedicated quality cam lock straps for each item. They were simply located with cable ties where they went around the frame so that I didn't have to work out the tie down setup each time....just place and do up the cam locks.
Nothing came loose in 30.000km that included NT Savanna Way, Gibb, Karajini, etc.
AnswerID: 598905

Follow Up By: johno59 - Thursday, Apr 21, 2016 at 06:55

Thursday, Apr 21, 2016 at 06:55
Great Idea Trev, a continuous loop makes a whole lot of sense to me .Ratchet Straps if not tied down correctly could be a useless as Any other form of securing a load. Like the idea of using Cable Ties thanks johno







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Reply By: Member - Trevor_H - Thursday, Apr 21, 2016 at 12:10

Thursday, Apr 21, 2016 at 12:10
Remember when the seat belts in cars (and aircraft) were cam locks?
AnswerID: 598927

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