12 volt hot water kettles

Submitted: Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 08:36
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Has anyone had experience with these? I would like to get one but want to make sure it's good quality and will do the job. Johno
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Reply By: HKB Electronics - Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 09:07

Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 09:07
Used the elchepao type sold on Ebay etc about 30 years back, worked ok but will take about 30 minutes to boil half a litre.

There is also Power Hunt who specialise in 12V appliances but you'll need to install suitable cabling to power these and have suitable battery capacity.

Cheers

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Reply By: Notso - Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 09:07

Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 09:07
I had one years ago. I could have gathered grass and twigs, rubbed two sticks together lit a flame and then boiled the kettle whilst the 12 volt kettle was just starting to warm up.

Having said that it was about 15 years ago so maybe things have improved!
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Reply By: Member - TonyV - Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 09:41

Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 09:41
Have a read through this from 2012 as a starter.
Exploroz 12V kettles (click here)

I had one in the past (cheapy from Supercheap) for the boat, it tended to be slowish and power hungry with cold water which was a pain. So I went back to the flask of hot water, reheated by the kettle, then just the flask.

Newer 12volt kettles may be better.
TonyV

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Reply By: Member - Ian T6 - Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 10:29

Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 10:29
Basic law of the universe 1 litre of water at 15c needs 600w (50A) to boil in 10 minutes without losses. Or 50 minutes at 120W. Unless you have heaps of spare DC go with gas.

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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Saturday, Apr 23, 2016 at 08:50

Saturday, Apr 23, 2016 at 08:50
As Ian says - heating water is very energy intensive. Good use for gas, very hard on any 12V vehicle based electrics.

John
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Reply By: Old 55 - Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 12:49

Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 12:49
Buy a Jet Boil and a spare canister and this will boil water in a couple of minutes and packs up to fit in a sock.

Forget the 12v Kettle takes ages to boil.
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Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 12:54

Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 12:54
Another vote from me for the Jet Boil...

I was a reluctant buyer initially, but Mrs Landy said "Baz - open the wallet".

Now, I wouldn't be without it (or Mrs Landy for that matter!).

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
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Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 23:16

Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 23:16
X three for jet boil.

And you can buy a really neat little coffee press anda frypan to fit on top.

Pretty quick to boil and the canisters last a while as well.

Cheers

Anthony
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Reply By: Motherhen - Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 23:27

Friday, Apr 22, 2016 at 23:27
Our daughter lent us hers to take when we went to Tasmania. She said it takes for ever to come to the boil. We never tried it, simpler to use the kettle for a few minutes on the gas stove.

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Reply By: Tony H15 - Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 11:45

Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 11:45
We've been using the 12 volt kettles for 30 odd years, they work well. Sure they take 30-50 minutes to boil, depending on wattage, but when you're driving for hours on end, what's the problem.. We use ours all the time, not just when caravaning but also when travelling from one side of the city to the other or just out on a Sunday drive. In short they work well, you just have to remember to keep them filled and turn them on in plenty of time.
Don't use them unless the engine is running, they are quite power hungry. Cheap or expensive, there's not a lot of difference. Our last (from Supercheap) is five plus years old, has seen a lot of use and took just over 30 minutes to boil. It still works great but we replaced it with a more traditional looking kettle, takes longer (about 50 minutes) but it looks nice.

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Reply By: The Bantam - Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 18:12

Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 18:12
The thing to remember is heating anything with 12 volt electricity is a fools erand.

Heating with electricity is slow and inefficient at the best of times, even on mains electricity.

There simply is no substitute for burning something for heat.

The new (suposedly safer) gas cartridge stoves are cheap and effective .... and they will boil water in a few minutes.

Just about any 12 volt heating applianace is a waste of time and money.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Tony H15 - Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 19:26

Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 19:26
What a ridiculous statement. If you're driving for hours on end how does it waste time or cost money to boil a bit of water via the car's lighter socket. Of course if you want to stop and boil the billy on a gas stove you can do both, can't you?
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 20:48

Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 20:48
Not a rediculous statement at all. ....... heating things with electricity from a 12v source IS rediculously slow and inefficient.

So you are driving around with a jug of possibly boiling water in the vehicle ...... that is rediculous.
How do you keep it upright, how reliable is the lid, what happens in an accident.

If you use a gas stove you can have a cuppa ready in minutes ...... pretty much on demand. ..... probably in less time that it took to walk to the toilet and back.

As far as the efficiency ....... the blasted things take so long to boil water you probably lost more than half the energy in wasted heat.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 20:51

Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 20:51
Sounds a bit dangerous to have an unsealed container of boiling water loose in a moving vehicle!
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Follow Up By: Tony H15 - Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 20:58

Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 20:58
You still haven't answered my question, what does it cost you and how much time does it waste boiling the kettle when you're driving? To answer you're questions - you use a little common sense.
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Follow Up By: Tony H15 - Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 21:22

Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 21:22
Yeah right, of course you'd sit there with a jug of boiling water on your lap without a lid, the obvious place for it.
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 22:02

Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 22:02
How much does it cost ...... well it cost $30 something, to buy the piece of junk to start with.

The electricity from you alternator is not free, you are paying for that in fuel.

Now this jug of boiling water how is it restrained in the vehicle.
Does it leak when inverted.
If it should come loose in an accident, will it remain in tact, contents still sealed.
Do all parts of the item remain cool to touch.

Boiling water in a moving vehicle yeh great idea.

A waste of time and money ... and dangerous to boot.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Tony H15 - Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 23:00

Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 23:00
The alternator works all the time regradless of whether it is powering a fridge, a kettle or a GPS. Now if you were to disconnect all those things how much do you think you would save - another ridiculous statement.
Your questions can be addressed quite simply by using a little common sense, try it sometime!
Actually I have a question for you bantam, what's more dangerous, boiling water secured in the boot or the bantam running down cyclists because he doesn't beleive they have a right to use 'his' road.
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 23:58

Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 23:58
Yes it is all to frequent that people playing the common sense card have it in short supply themselves.

They claim, they have common sense and others don't ......

One that will not realise that, he by riding a bicycle on a busy road is the one creating the dangerous situation and expecting others ( the 99% majority road users) to solve his problem by changing the way they use the road.

Likewise can not see the risks of boiling water and unsupervised electrical appliance in a moving vehicle.

So we have an unanttended, unsupervised electrical heating appliance in the boot .... oh great.

!2 Volt electric jug, one of the most rediculous devices I have ever come across.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Tony H15 - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 09:57

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 09:57
One of the most ridiculous things I have ever come across is the bantam. You are an idiot!
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 11:08

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 11:08
Can't make a logical and reasoned argument so you begin with the personal attack.
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Follow Up By: Tony H15 - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 11:37

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 11:37
Sorry, but there is no logic or reason in any of your arguments, just stupidity! I'd bet you've never even used a 12 volt kettle, obviously you will say you have just to further your ridiculous assumptions, but I'd expect that!
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 13:02

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 13:02
Continues persoanl attack , nothing to do with the matter in question.

I don't need to use a 12V kettle to know what a rediculous thing they are.
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Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 13:20

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 13:20
Come On! Put them away boys.

This is adding nothing to the quality of the responses or the forum in general.

Cheers

Anthony

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Follow Up By: Tony H15 - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 13:36

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 13:36
Done! Ten characters.
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Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 23:09

Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 23:09
Forget 12V for heating anything. Even 12V soldering irons are a PIA.

24V, you do stand a slightly better chance of producing some decent current - particularly if it's coming from a couple of 200 A/H batteries!

The solution to a quick cuppa is right here ....

Hexamine stove with 8 tablets for $9.95

With one of these, you can boil a litre of water in not much more time than it takes to stop, stretch your legs and take a leak.

They served us well, camping in the J in Vietnam! - I can't see any problem with them on the road!

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 12:12

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 12:12
TomO, the crown prince uses his hexamine stove whenever we are Out and About...

Cheers, Baz
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Follow Up By: Tony H15 - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 22:33

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 22:33
I have a $19 12 volt soldering iron, it works great, it doesn't heat up as fast as my $98 Iroda gas iron, nor as hot but it heats up faster than the $160 soldering station in my shed.
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Reply By: Tony H15 - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 13:39

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 13:39
You should always experience something before offering an opinion, without that you are simply making assumptions based on preconceived ideas. The 12 volt kettle is a very efficient item; it will heat water whilst you are driving and cost neither time nor money in the process... Heating water on portable gas stoves, Hexamine stoves, the caravan stove or simply building a small fire to heat said water work fine and are quick but one has to stop to do it. If you don't want to stop then a 12 volt kettle will suffice. It may take 30-50 minutes to reach the required temperature but if you are stuck in the car driving anyway, what is the problem? As for having boiling water in a moving vehicle, the answer is quite simple, put the kettle in a suitable container away from anywhere it could cause harm in the event of a sudden stop or accident. Most have mounting clips so you can clip the kettle to the plastic container or use the handle to secure the kettle in the plastic container as I do. Most have screw on lids so the lid coming off is not an issue. If you are involved in an accident, I think you will have more serious things to worry about than a little hot water dripping from the kettle's lid. I keep mine in a plastic container behind the seat or in the luggage area behind the rear seat of my SUV, when I'm ready for a cuppa I simply plug it in and wait for it to reach the required temperature. Coffee satchets, teabags, sugar, etc, I keep in the same container and the milk in the fridge behind the rear seat. If you are that worried about having hot water in your vehicle then don't let it boil. A 12 volt kettle takes considerably longer than 30-50- minutes to boil water as it would in a 240 volt kettle, but it's plenty warm enough after that 30-50 minutes.. We could all wrap ourselves in cotton wool and cry safety hazzard, safety hazzard, but realistically the vehicle itself represents more of a safety hazzard than half a litre of hot water. A thermos is another great idea, I quite often carry a thermos of hot water for a cuppa, also on my bicycle, dangerous I know, after all if an imbecilic motorist were to run me over the hot water could cause me pain.
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 18:46

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 18:46
Tony, I don't understand why you want to keep driving whilst heating water for 3/4 hr.
Do you also make your brew on the run as well?

Stopping to have a cuppa adds to the pleasure of the whole deal - not to mention getting a break from driving, getting out to stretch the muscles, and being able to check the rig over.

Then there's the added concern of 12V wiring that was never designed to carry heavy electrical load for 40 or 50 minutes.
Do you have separate wiring specifically installed for the kettle? - or are you just using the cigarette lighter plug?

Cheers, Ron.
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Reply By: Tony H15 - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 20:39

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 20:39
I enjoy stopping for a brew too, that is probably why I do. How many amps do you think these kettles use?
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 23:45

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 23:45
Well, comments like this one below, indicate to me that the 12V kettles draw substantial amounts of power.

"I would suggest putting in a heavy duty socket wired directly to the battery as the kettle can and will blow fuses on a normal cig lighter type outlet.
Just to qualify the fuse thing. They dont blow all the time and sometimes it would boil 15 times then blow the fuse which is why I now have a lead directly to the battery."

I've never seen any electric kettle that doesn't draw a huge amount of power.

Even 240V kettles often draw close to the maximum of a standard 10amp plug.

It's common sense that a 12V kettle HAS to draw a large amount of power to produce the heat necessary to boil water.

Hexamine tablets, gas or even a few bush twigs and leaves, will produce more heat in 3-4 mins than any 12V item would produce in an hour.
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Follow Up By: Tony H15 - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2016 at 09:48

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2016 at 09:48
I find that amazing, you're driving along the road, probably for hours on end in a vehicle that can supply 55+amps and you're worried how much power the kettle uses and how long it takes to heat the water for a cuppa - extraordinary.
As for power consumption, mine is rated at 120 watts, that's 10 amps and the socket is rated at 15 amps. Let me guess, next you'll be saying the vehicles wiring and socket aren't rated the same. Vehicle manufacturers supply extra sockets for just this purpose.
All this aside, I don't understand why you lot are getting so excited, if you want to heat water with hexamine tablets, gather sticks to heat water or use a portable stove more power to you, I don't have a problem with that, why on earth are you going on and on and on about electric kettles. Electric kettles are my choice, I like them and they suit my purpose no different to how hexamine tablets, twigs or gas suit your purposes if you don't like electric kettles don't use use them - simple.
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Follow Up By: Member - Blue M - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2016 at 16:22

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2016 at 16:22
Tony H15, I am on your side with the poor little electric kettle.
Most days on the road, what we used to do was pull up, the wife would make a sandwich on the tailgate, I would fill up the kettle, place it on the floor, plugged into just an ordinary 12v ciggy socket.
Never blew a fuse, ever, or melted any wires.

By the time we had a sandwich, the kettle would be hot enough (not boiling) and I could make a coffee in my travel mug, throw the kettle into the back of the ute and away we go. I can then drink it my leisure and not stand there and burn my lips on a scalding cup of coffee I made 5 times quicker than someone using a 12v kettle.

I know the dangers of driving and drinking a hot coffee, but this is heated water, not boiling.

It had been around Australia twice and was at least 6 years old when I finally got around to throwing it out.

On any windy day I would be happy to observe someone make a little fire of twigs, to boil water in a few moments, on the side of the road, same as a little gas stove.

What works good for you, does not necessarily mean it is neither stupid/idiotic because others do not agree with your method, especially when never used the said item.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Tony H15 - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2016 at 17:17

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2016 at 17:17
Well Blue, you're asking for trouble here, beware of the wrath of the anti 12 volt brigade. But if you are determined to use the 12 volt kettle don't forget the fire blanket, a fire extinguisher, several dozen fuses, two 10,000 AH batteries, a burns treatment kit and a booking at the local medical centre. Oh and don't forget to wrap yourself in cotton wool just in case you trip over the cord. The cotton wool should also keep you warm overnight whilst waiting for the water to get hot enough. I'm told you'd be much better off with a Jet Boil, they are available from Anaconda for the very reasonable price of $199 plus $10 per canister!
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