Maralinga

Submitted: Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 19:37
ThreadID: 132224 Views:2523 Replies:7 FollowUps:4
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Anyone been to Maralinga recently? We are travelling from Perth and are thinking about going into Maralinga via Watson and then returning via Ooldea. Any comments? We already have our permit.
Bernie Renwick
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 21:08

Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 21:08
Hi Julebern

Things do not change much up that way. From Watson all the way through to Maralinga is all bitumen, while coming back through Ooldea is dirt from the Maralinga turnoff.

If you are heading up to Watson from Nullarbor Roadhouse, make sure you read the Track notes that I put up here on EO, as the track is not signposted at all and you must keep an eye out for this tyre on the Old Eyre Highway track, where you head north on the two wheel track to Watson.


Cheers


Stephen

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Reply By: JR268 - Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 22:53

Sunday, Apr 24, 2016 at 22:53
Just wondering if you need a permit to travel through the Yalata Aboriginal Reserve to travel on the old eyre hwy and up to Warson. We are travelling that way in July.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 08:04

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 08:04
Hi JR

Going up to Watson from Nullarbor Roadhouse and you will be travelling through the Nullarbor Regional Reserve. Land south of the Trans Continental Railway Line that way is non Aboriginal Landand Crown Land, and it is only when you cross the Trans Line that you then enter Aboriginal Land.

There is an old sign there and if you are going to Maralinga, you will already have your permits.



Cheers



Stephen


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Reply By: Baz - The Landy - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 08:17

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 08:17
Go, it is a great experience and a part of contemporary Australian history that is not well known to younger Australians.

I wrote the following on our experience that you might like to review...

Maralinga - A Glowing Report

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
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Reply By: Member - Robyn R4 - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 09:36

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 09:36
I was once in the no-man's-land area of radio reception and could only get ABC. I was listening to a chat with a bloke who lived out there when they were doing all the testing.
He said the authorities would call them and let them know they were going to start and were they all in their shelter? They'd answer that they were and they were actually out on top of their bunker watching it all!
He had stories about debris that they'd find on their property and the denials from authorities that it could possibly be theirs...but very soon, someone would be along to collect it!
I vaguely remember an ABC episode of some show about it as well.
Very interesting.
I'm curious...when you go out there, what do you see?
Desert?
I'll have to check that one out.

:)
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 10:16

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 10:16
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Hi Robyn,

I think that the "shelters" you speak of were provided to the station properties that were on the Woomera missile range and not related to the atomic trials at Maralinga. The stations and the Woomera operations had a good relationship and I doubt that the "authorities" would deny the debris. Some blokes like to embellish the facts somewhat.
But yes, the account of station folk standing on top of their shelters was folklore even back in the 50's when the trials were in progress.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 10:43

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 10:43
There is one of these "rocket shelters" on "Austral Downs", SW of Camooweal. Still in really good order, and will probably last until Armageddon Day........whenever that will be?

Will find a photo of it when Linda is finished on the PC, and post it here.

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Reply By: Member - pete g1 - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 10:12

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 10:12
http://www.maralingatours.com.au/


may assist
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Reply By: Member - Robyn R4 - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 11:28

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 11:28
That's right! It was Woomera.
And yeh, they had dugouts all fitted out with food and water.
I love the photo of the track...typical country and outback directions!
You could picture an old bloke (with leathery outback skin and a lifetime of amazing experiences) at a pub giving instructions drawn on the back of a coaster..."You go up the track until you see a tyre shoved half under a bush and then you take the track with 2 wheel tracks..."!!
:)
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 12:21

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 12:21
Hi Robyn

Yes all stations that were in the flight pass of the testing rockets were given the fall out shelters, an even to this day, test still happen from Woomera and on major tests, the station people as ordered to leave their stations, and event that only happened a couple of years ago.

The shelters were like extra strong Nissan Huts, but the steel covering is very thick, around 8mm thick, then covered in a very thick layer of dirt, being able to withstand a direct hit from any fall out, and the front panel is around 15mm steel.


Cheers


Stephen.






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Reply By: Member - Julebern - Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 13:06

Monday, Apr 25, 2016 at 13:06
Thanks All for the comments and suggestions.we should be there in about 10 days.

Keep travelling

Bernie Renwick
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