Tubes for Splits

Submitted: Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 00:18
ThreadID: 132274 Views:2706 Replies:2 FollowUps:10
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Howdy

After a part no/code for heavy duty tubes for 235/85/R16 tyres and a rough cost, anyone in SA bought any and if so where, alternatively I'll try fleabay

Cheers
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Reply By: Member - shane r1 - Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 07:54

Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 07:54
Hi
I was a tyre dealer, and my thoughts are that any 235/85-16 tubes were cheap brands. My recommendation is to use 750-16 in a good brand e.g. Bridgestone or Michelin they will perform and last a lot longer, much better quality
Cheers
AnswerID: 599349

Follow Up By: Rojac - Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 08:43

Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 08:43
Granted am looking at bridgestones or michelins but is the 7.50 - 16 tube the right size for a 235/85-16 tyre and what valve type , is it a JS 75 or TR 75 for example

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 09:36

Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 09:36
Rojac - Shane has hit the nail on the head - stick with the good brand names if you want want quality tubes.
The better quality tubes generally come from Korea. Hankook tubes should also be satisfactory quality.

A good quality 7.00/7.50 x 16 tube will fit a wide range of tyre sizes, but all sizes won't necessarily be stamped on the tube.
On page 86 of the catalogue below, you'll find all the sizes that a "premium" 7.00/7.50 x 16 tube will fit.

Carlisle Tire Catalog

Mick Hutton from Beadell Tours has a good page on his experiences with running tubed 4WD tyres on bush tracks.

Beadell Tours - tyre report 2013

Mick mentions a couple of things that are of importance when using tubes.
One (which I knew about, and have always done, myself), is to use plenty of talc or "French chalk" when fitting tubes.

The talc provides lubrication between tyre and tube that reduces friction and prevents heat buildup and chafing. It will also save the tube if you get a sudden flat at speed. No talc means the tube becomes rubber salad by the time you've stopped.

The other point Mick mentions is sealing split rims with silicone to prevent the ingress of water and grit. This is not something I've heard of before, but it makes sense and it obviously works for him.

Mick is pretty scathing of most tyre shops performance. Note his annoyance at tyre shops leaving stickers on tubes that led to tube failure.

One thing I have found, is that tubes are becoming more expensive and harder to find every year. The tyre industry doesn't want to know about tubes.
I have a 5 ton truck fitted with tubed 8.25 x 16's and even these tubed truck tyres are becoming very expensive, and harder and harder to find. The industry only wants tubeless, they regard tubed tyres as ancient technology.

Another point is, that there is available, an externally-threaded valve stem fitted with a nut that is clamped to the rim, that helps prevents rims from spinning inside the tyre and ripping the valve stem off, when operating with heavy loads and low tyre pressures.

These valve stems are called a rally-type valve stem, but I don't know this stems part/code number.

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Rojac - Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 10:03

Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 10:03
Thanks, I've had a look previously at the Beadall Tyre article

The catalog has two tube stems TR13/15CW both of which appear to be vertical, I need the stem to be perpendicular to the base and to extend out similar to what I have on my current 7.50 R 16 tyre tubes otherwise I can't see how you would inflate vertical stems unless I'm missing something in the interpretation of the diagram

Plan to upgrade the tyres to 235/85 and will change the tubes and bands.

The only time I've had tyre failure is when cheapass tally ho paper thin tubes were fitted so I'd rather source the tubes myself.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 10:23

Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 10:23
Yes, the variety of stem types is substantial, due to many rim variations, and you need the stem that suits your specific rim and application.
The TR13 and TR15 are the fairly common, straight, rubberised valve stems, with a taper along their length.
The style of valve stem you're seeking would be the TR440 or TR75 style. Here's a stem catalog.

Valve stem catalog

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 10:47

Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 10:47
I'd initially go direct to the Bridgestone or Michelin local head offices themselves and find out if they have the tubes available that you're seeking, and where the local branch or dealer is, that you can source them from.

The company in the link below are selling a "premium" tube that is the Korean "Nexen" brand. They have a branch in Pt Adelaide. They have these tubes available with TR75 and TR177 stems.

This crowd also sell Toyo and Yokahama, and both of these brands may have the tubes you're after, available as well.

Tyre and Tube Australia

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Rojac - Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 10:51

Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 10:51
Thanks Ron
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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 13:11

Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 13:11
"Another point is, that there is available, an externally-threaded valve stem fitted with a nut that is clamped to the rim, that helps prevents rims from spinning inside the tyre and ripping the valve stem off..."

When I use to race (motorbike) enduros etc way back when we would leave the valve stem nut off because that is exactly what causes the valve stem to get ripped out of the tube if the tyre/tube spun.

The nut (on a motorcycle at least) would play no part in preventing the tyre/tube spinning..the tube will still spin but progressively stretch around the valve stem area until failure. Its only purpose I think is to stop the vale stem disappearing into the rim when the tyre is flat. Once the tyre is inflated it serves no purpose, unless the tyre goes flat again, in which case you probably have a puncture and have to take the tyre of anyway.

It may be different for cars running tubes (cant see it though) but my suggestion would to not use a valve stem nut. If your tyre spins the valve may get pulled through to inside the rim (and you will have to let it down and spin it back) but that is better than tube with the valve stem ripped out, which may happen without a nut as well in some cases..but less likely.

Cheers
Greg
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Follow Up By: 671 - Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 20:08

Saturday, Apr 30, 2016 at 20:08
"The other point Mick mentions is sealing split rims with silicone to prevent the ingress of water and grit. This is not something I've heard of before, but it makes sense and it obviously works for him."
--------------------------------------------
Ron
That idea does work very well. I have just replaced a set of 10 year old tyres. They had plenty of chalk in them and the wheel was sealed with ordinary low cost roof and gutter sealer from Bunnings. There was no trace of rust on the wheels even after many deep water crossings.

I not only filled the valve stem hole and the ring gap with the sealer but I placed it right around between the ring and the wheel. It is easy to run a tiny bead around the wheel then run a finger over it. You would have to look twice to see that it is there.

Regarding Mick Hutton and his tubes: I had a long phone discussion with him back in 2008 on tyres and Outback driving. I asked him what type of tubes he used expecting the reply to be MRF like his tyres. He said "Heavy duty Chinese. Not everything out of China is rubbish". He could not remember the brand. I would say they would have been supplied by his tyre dealer in Adelaide. I am sure he would have remembered had they not worked.
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Follow Up By: Member - shane r1 - Sunday, May 01, 2016 at 17:56

Sunday, May 01, 2016 at 17:56
Another comment from me.
With the right equipment and technique it is as easy to change and repair a tubeless tyre, and then you don't have the problem and expense of a tube.
If you get a nail in a tubeless tyre it usually only leaks slow, with a tubed tyre it will generally go flat quickly .
the reason as a tyre dealer I didn't like tubes , is we saw a lot of flat tyres from tube failure ,especially other than bridgestones and Michelin, not by being punctured by anything. Some may be thicker but that's no garrentee of the quality of the stuff they are made out of.
Good luck
Which is always needed with tyres
Cheers Shane
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FollowupID: 868632

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, May 01, 2016 at 19:29

Sunday, May 01, 2016 at 19:29
French chalk was always a bit hard to source Ron, so our workshop often smelt like the change room at the local KMart! Plenty of J & J baby powder in the station store......

While we occasionally sourced Michey tubes, our brand of choice were Bridgestone. Sturdy tubes, in a strong wrapper, with a brass valve cap. After some dramas we were informed to remove any internal stickers in the tyre cases......end of, well, a reduction in tyre dramas.

I'm not sorry to be running tubeless these days........hated those Toyota split rims!

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, May 01, 2016 at 19:06

Sunday, May 01, 2016 at 19:06
Rojac,
10 years ago that was a very hard question to answer because it was hard to get anything else except poor quality Korean tubes that were thin and easily split. Not sure that much has changed as even the mining companies appear to have given up on splits.
The last time I searched Adelaide for good tubes, I ended up getting original Toyota tubes taken out of new tyres - Beaurepaires in Gouger Street used to do a fair bit of work for CMI, and had a pile of these virtually new tubes. They were significantly better than what you could get new. Others I know used to find or order Michelin tubes. But all my diehard split rim friends have gone tubeless!

And the small upsize to 235/85 won't matter.
AnswerID: 599413

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