Australia is safe

Submitted: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 at 22:09
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Mainly for Overseas Tourists.
I've been traveling the bush for decades and I have lived to tell the tale.

Spiders: See them all the time but you don't walk into the web and you're OK

Snakes: Seen Maybe 15. They all slither away when they hear you coming

Scorpions: Seen three, two were under rocks.

Crocs: Don't go up there much but be careful and obey signs

Dingo: I don't have a baby but they generally leave you alone, have seen many

Sharks: There are places you can watch these things swim but choose your beach carefully

Eagles: They look scary but will leave you alone. Watch out for them eating on the highway.

Remember to take water with you when you go outback

Looking for adventure.
In whatever comes our way.
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Reply By: Michael H9 - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 00:16

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 00:16
You haven't mentioned dangerous psychopaths? If you read up on it, there have been quite a few. Joseph Schwabb the Kimberly Killer, Ivan Milat, Bradley Murdoch are stand outs. I'm watching that new Wolf Creek series now.... :-)
Still, the most dangerous activities for tourists are swimming and driving in a car when all is said and done. But how boring is that?
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Follow Up By: Danna - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 01:20

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 01:20
Michael,
Wolf Creek is funny if you have been few times there and a specially if you take a small plane and fly over the area, you know there is no structure like Mike Taylor had not there. Yes, and think about distances and other stuff like that Aboriginal guy teaching GIRL to throw a spear using woomera .... Aboriginal guy .... totally impossible ... he wouldn't break their law. Laugh with me ......
Hooroo Dana
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Follow Up By: equinox - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 09:35

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 09:35
ah yes, the Aussie pyscho's...they come every decade or so - slim chance you'll be a victim - still.....

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Follow Up By: Life Member - Duncan W (WA) - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:45

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:45
Al some of the places you go by yourself may put you into the Psycho' category. LOL
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Reply By: Member. Rob M (QLD) - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 05:39

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 05:39
You forgot to mention the deadly DROP BEAR!
I haven't seen any, but I think I heard one once.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 07:20

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 07:20
Rod......

Why did you mention our most ever feared animal....the deadly Drop Bear........

The reason why Alan never mentioned them, as anyone that has even seen one, has ever lived to tell the story.

Cheers and stay clear of our most feared animal ever.....Killer Drop Bears.



Stephen
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 09:06

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 09:06
Jokingly, in a presentation to some senior staff of a BIG international company, visiting from England ,I mentioned the Drop Bears in regard to a function later that day. At the BBQ I saw one of the visitors looking up at the trees at a local bush picnic/camp/playground. Yes I did go over and explain our casual way of life. With a chuckle we went and got another VB and all was well with the world. Phew - I still have a job - says me!!!

Don't you just love the Australian way. Wouldn't swap it for quids.

Phil

PS My mob
Just a small sample.
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Follow Up By: equinox - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 09:36

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 09:36
oh of course the drop bears....They are fairly slow moving so unless you are frail or slow, you should be ok :-)

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Reply By: OBJ - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 08:24

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 08:24
Don't tell them that .. otherwise they will all come here and be nowhere left to park or camp in the outback!!!! The biggest killer could well be the sun/heat of summer. It claims a few most years.
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Reply By: Malcom M - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 08:25

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 08:25
My experience is that most o/seas travelers simply do not believe the stories about Australias deadliest. Have see phone pics taken by proud French backpackers playing with a Taipan in the bush. Did not believe us about funnel webs or Crocs, openly laughed at us, everything was a joke to stir up tourists.
Have come upon that attitude quite a lot. Even have a German mate (Oz citizen) who does not believe in Crocs. He's been to the Cape and never saw one hence its all BS for tourists

Whilst you are taking great pains to convince travelers that Oz is quite safe, and it is if you know whats going on, I feel that the advising the opposite to the ignorant might be more productive.
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Follow Up By: equinox - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 19:35

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 19:35
Hi Malcom, I hear what you are saying however generally people appeal to more positive comments.

And some visitors do take things at face value - remember that mob of Asylum seekers who beached their boat on the northern coast - and battered a croc to death for food!!!
Cheers
Alan


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Reply By: dad1340 - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 08:40

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 08:40
Oh boy, I hope your not a travel agent equinox ;)

We shared our campfire with a German couple last winter and I was told of the level of fear generated in Europe regarding travelling in Oz.
This couple told us of serials killers, Dingo attacks and other events some of which we had not even heard of. Oops and yes, their favourite movie 'Wolf Creek'

Naturally, I then had to tell them about the ancient 'Camoolic' (spelling?) our legendary Australian creature that waits at the edge of the fire-light in the bushes .... waiting ....

..... the wife cut me off and offered a coffee to our guests. She told me later, "did you see their faces? they were terrified !

I couldn't keep a straight face.

I don't think the European level of paranoia is restricted to Europeans either; how many times (these days) when you camp in an isolated spot does someone drive up and camp right next to you with an area the size of a football ground to choose from?

Sometimes I feel like bubbling up and dribbling toothpaste down my chin and run at them barking ;)

PS The main character that the movie Wolf Creek was based on (not Jarratt) has never been caught.

Cheers

dad
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Follow Up By: Member - tazbaz - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 09:10

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 09:10
I thought Wolf Creek's main character was based on Bradley Murdoch. If not, who was it then?
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:54

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:54
The movie "Wolf Creek" was entirely fictional, but publicised as "based on true events". It could be seen to contain scenes derived from the incidents of Murdoch and Milat and possibly others in the imagination of the producers.
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Follow Up By: dad1340 - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 14:34

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 14:34
Am I the only one that has seen then humorous side of this?
My comments were entirely 'tongue in check'

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dad
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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Saturday, May 21, 2016 at 01:27

Saturday, May 21, 2016 at 01:27
I was lead to believe it was based on Milat, in fact if you look carefully there is supposed to be a sign somewhere in the film with the name "Talim" on it, which is Milat spelt backwards.

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Saturday, May 21, 2016 at 08:54

Saturday, May 21, 2016 at 08:54
John, if you were to research by Googling "movie wolf creek" you may come to a different conclusion.
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Reply By: Member - Robert1660 - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:15

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:15
Enjoyed the commentary so far, however there is a more serious side to this discussion as well. I am referring to the issue of "remoteness". I know that most OS visitors really stick to the more populated area, however there are the more adventurous who do travel to remote areas. This is especially concerning if they travel in summer and of course many will not realise that there is no mobile coverage in most outback regions. Many of these travelers do not appreciate the distances involved and just how isolated they can be.
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Follow Up By: dad1340 - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 14:38

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 14:38
Yes Robert I agree.

And with more seriousness that my last post suggest is possible; a question; What happened to the "Asians in the Blue Van" that left Birdsville cited in a recent post?

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dad
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Follow Up By: LAZYLUX16 - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 15:30

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 15:30
Robert 1660 .I worked out near Birdsville and camped off the track about 200metres.Could see down the track quite away as on a slight hill in the distance was a tail of dust coming up the track not usual 4wd dust.To my amazement a Jap guy on an 80cc motorbike he came over asking for water .It was like 40 degrees..I think its about time when foriegners land at airports should be given a booklet on traveling in Oz..
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Reply By: dean ( SA ) - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:27

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:27
http://australianmuseum.net.au/drop-bear
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Reply By: pop2jocem - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:40

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:40
How come no one has thought to warn our overseas visitors about the legendary and much feared bunyip?

This isn't just some BS story that some johny-come-lately white fella dreamed up.

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: Kevin G6 - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:55

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:55
Good one pop! The Bunyip would have to be the most fearsome of the lot!
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 16:14

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 16:14
Oooooh!! Yes! ... I've heard the Bunyip scream in the pitch black of the night!!

It fairly makes the hair rise on the back of your neck!!

Some people reckon it's foxes screaming ... but we, who've lived in the bush for long periods, know better!! LOL
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Friday, May 20, 2016 at 02:31

Friday, May 20, 2016 at 02:31
and theres the smaller and rarer sub species found in WA the Yowie
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Reply By: Bigfish - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:50

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:50
Reckon I have seen a hell of a lot of remote areas. I still think the most dangerous thing I have encounted is a take away shops dim-sims!
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Follow Up By: dad1340 - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 14:43

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 14:43
Spot on Bigfish,
But the 'Worlds Worst Reheated Dim Sim's' are at a Roadhouse Westbound before Broken Hill.

That's scary !
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 23:24

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 23:24
I was chundering all night a few months back from a spring roll on special at Fraser Island. I wonder how many backpackers got caught with the same batch?
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Reply By: Member - Rod N (QLD) - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 12:11

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 12:11
Don't forget the Min Min lights, they'll scare the crp outa you, ay.
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Reply By: Ron N - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 12:19

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 12:19
Wedgetail eagles will leave you alone?? Only if you don't get into their territory!





And don't carry, or get near something that they recognise as a meal! - and that they want!!

The old man told us how he was with a group of blokes on one of the big plains in the Upper Murchison, in the early 1930's.
They shot a 'roo for tucker, drove over to it in the old Dodge tourer, and one bloke started skinning it.

Without warning, and without anyone else seeing it, a huge wedgetail dropped out of the sky, and sank its talons into the leg of the bloke who was bending over the 'roo!

It was no doubt a grab for the 'roo, more than the bloke, he just got in the way!

The wedgie reckoned he wanted that 'roo, a whole lot more than those humans did!!

The gash in the blokes leg was pretty severe, he was bleeding badly, and they had to bandage him up with what they had in the old Dodge.
It was a couple of weeks before he could walk again without a limp!

Cheers, Ron.

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Reply By: Top End Az - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 13:17

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 13:17
Don't forget about melioidosis. It's a bacteria in the soil, most common in northern Australia. It's contracted by walking around with bare feet and if you have a small cut or sore, especially after rain, the bacteria enters your system and it does kill people.

A lot of visitors we have in Darwin don't believe you when you tell them that one. Also commonly known as Nightcliff Gardners disease (Nightcliff being a Darwin suburb).

http://health.nt.gov.au/library/scripts/objectifyMedia.aspx?file=pdf/43/46.pdf&siteID=1&str_title=Melioidosis.pdf
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Reply By: LAZYLUX16 - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 14:15

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 14:15
Dingo take a baby err I think that is still debatable .Mind you animals are taught many tricks maybe Dingo learnt to change nappies.
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Follow Up By: Danna - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 15:33

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 15:33
No, not a dingo, but the kangaroo dog take baby with no problem.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 16:37

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 16:37
If you had seen the clip lock lid 40L plastic box containing tinned food that a dingo on Fraser Island carried..... not dragged..... 15m from our camp you would maybe believe that a dingo could carry a baby.
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Follow Up By: Member - Robert1660 - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 16:53

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 16:53
My experience on Fraser Island would also suggest that dingos are very bold and very capable. I can't recall the exact details apart from the fact that we were minding our own business and certainly not encouraging any dingos when one approached my 9 year old daughter and stole her hat which at the time was fortunately NOT on her head. I too always doubted the Lindy Chamberland story but seeing the dingos on Fraser would make you think that "baby stealing" could not be ruled out as a possibility.
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Follow Up By: LAZYLUX16 - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 20:33

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 20:33
I have slept next to a Dingo out near Alice Springs did not worry me a bit.Perhaps different breed on Fraser .And wonder how the Dingo unwrapoed the baby so carefully .
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 23:00

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 23:00
Were you a baby at the time LL?
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Allan

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Reply By: pop2jocem - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 15:02

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 15:02
Not sure how you guys feel about it but personally I feel we should be warning those not familiar with them about that most irksome and at times dangerous of Ozzie inhabitants.

The lesser Australian Yobbo.

While these can be found in many and varied habitats, they do seem to be more numerous around cities and towns.
As many of the regular population of a city like Melbourne are aware there exists a sub-species known as the Collingwobble Bogan.
Whilst mainly sedentary they do at certain times of the year migrate.
During the winter months they are easily identified, when they gather in great flocks, at various sporting grounds by their characteristic black and white winter plumage and their raucous call of "CARN THE PIES, CARN THE PIES, repeated in a most monotonous way.
The "CARN THE PIES" call is often interspersed with "YA BLIND YA MUG" if a much less common specimen of the Yellow Chested Umpire Bird issues its shrill whistle like call. and then proceeds to point in an unpopular direction.

IMHO these gatherings of these magpie like types should be avoided at all costs.

(;-))

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: Bigfish - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 16:05

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 16:05
Ah yes...the famous black and white maggot. The swans have the swanettes, the tigers have the tigettes and the magpies have the maggots. Dangerous breed alright. Very vocal when leading a game but silent when on a belting. Easily upset and have total disregard for sense or football facts.
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Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 16:26

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 16:26
G'day Pop

you forgot to mention the amazing ability the black and white Colliwobble bogan has of eating an apple through a chain wire fence using one of their three teeth !!


Cheers

Gazz
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Reply By: Member - Terry W4 - Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 19:00

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 19:00
The most dangerous thing in the Australian outback is a know-all. Someone who thinks he has the answer to everything dusty and dry.
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Reply By: Gaynor - Friday, May 20, 2016 at 03:43

Friday, May 20, 2016 at 03:43
I am an overseas tourist therefore likely to fall into that stupid ignorant don't know any better category so many Australians place us 'buiterlanders' in.

It is a wonder that I am still alive considering all the wandering around the great Outback I have done these past 25 years, including five years of intensive hitchhiking alone right across Australia. I even survived camping at Wolfe Creek whilst hitchhiking the Tanami, despite hearing repeated stories of serial killers.

PLEASE. Australia is one the of the safest countries on Earth and if any of you left your back yard and travelled extensively around the world, you would understand that as being a fact.

Whenever this subject comes up I can cite more dead Australians in the Outback than tourists, but apparently that is irrelevant to the preferred beliefs of this group.
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Friday, May 20, 2016 at 08:09

Friday, May 20, 2016 at 08:09
True, there's probably a million Aussies spread out all over the outback and all of them will die sooner or later. Now if you really want a dangerous place, Africa is your destination, it's got the lot. The true indication of dangerous is if your tour guide is armed, especially if they have a machine gun. As for wildlife being dangerous....our maneaters are pretty tame compared to there. We haven't even got any land based ones. How lame is that?
I've always wanted to drive from Cape Town to London but the odds of getting killed doing it are now high if you read up on the countries you have to pass through. But...more locals die there than tourists. :-)
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Friday, May 20, 2016 at 11:10

Friday, May 20, 2016 at 11:10
Gaynor,

When travelling this wide brown land of ours there is a item you would be advised to take a large container of. Apart from the usual water, food stuffs, maps etc.

It comes in handy especially in outback areas.

It's a good supply of "Sense of humour". It can get you through the trickiest of situations.

Cheers and enjoyable travels.
Pop
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Reply By: Neil P4 - Friday, May 20, 2016 at 14:51

Friday, May 20, 2016 at 14:51
It is a very simple task to warn, alert and educate foreign travellers.
Just tell them to stay away from anything that starts with the letter "S".
Sharks
Scorpions
Spiders
Sheilas
Shopping
Shoes
Sex
Spending
Snakes
Sheila's (x2 just to be sure they are pre warned )
Stingers
I'm sure there is many more. Sheila's, sex normally lead to spending and shoes with the MOF
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