Only in The Territory

Submitted: Saturday, Jun 11, 2016 at 21:31
ThreadID: 132717 Views:3166 Replies:6 FollowUps:8
This Thread has been Archived
English tourists trek 10km after bogging 4WD at Litchfield National Park
LINK
gift by Daughter

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Jun 11, 2016 at 22:51

Saturday, Jun 11, 2016 at 22:51
Hi Doug

At least they had the brains to carry a PLB and as the policemen said, it more than likely saved their loves.

Don't you just love it when they drove on the closed road.....

Cheers
Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 601241

Follow Up By: Shaker - Saturday, Jun 11, 2016 at 23:12

Saturday, Jun 11, 2016 at 23:12
I wonder what happened to the supposed heavy fine 'per wheel' for driving on a closed road?
0
FollowupID: 870610

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Jun 11, 2016 at 23:19

Saturday, Jun 11, 2016 at 23:19
Agree Shaker, just because they were tourists, no excuse and they should have been fined like anyone else stupid enough to drive on a close road in that country.

Cheers
Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 870612

Reply By: Motherhen - Saturday, Jun 11, 2016 at 23:04

Saturday, Jun 11, 2016 at 23:04
Closed road, hire vehicle (probably not allowed on unsealed roads and certainly not closed roads. The report I read a few days ago said the vehicle was recovered simply by engaging 4wd.Reynolds River is also crocodile risk.
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 601243

Reply By: Top End Az - Sunday, Jun 12, 2016 at 08:43

Sunday, Jun 12, 2016 at 08:43
I recognised that track as Reynolds River when it was in the NT news. Thinking to myself 'Great, the tracks open might head down for the long weekend '. Double checked the NT Road report website to see it is still closed. Obviously the locked gate and Track Closed signs didn't mean anything to them, nor did the 2nd gear stick either it seems.

It's good they are safe and well but should have the book thrown at them but if they get fined there is no way to enforce it to be paid before they leave the country unfortunately.
AnswerID: 601246

Follow Up By: Life Member-Doug T NSW - Sunday, Jun 12, 2016 at 08:48

Sunday, Jun 12, 2016 at 08:48
If their Passports are seized they can not board a flight out of the country.
gift by Daughter

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 870616

Follow Up By: Top End Az - Sunday, Jun 12, 2016 at 09:24

Sunday, Jun 12, 2016 at 09:24
I think the authorities (courts) seize passports for serious crimes if people are considered flight risks. Better off linking the police outstanding fines database to the Immigration passport control point when leaving the country and a payment counter right behind it.
0
FollowupID: 870620

Follow Up By: Steve - Sunday, Jun 12, 2016 at 20:27

Sunday, Jun 12, 2016 at 20:27
Why bother? Just throw them to the crocs. Bloody foreign tourists. You'd never see an ozzy acting like that or leaving shite and paper all over the place. Well, not much, anyway - as long as nobody sees them. Germans, Poms, Yanks .... they're just not seasoned Pedantic Pensioner Palace Pullers with nothing better to whinge about. Oooh, the outrage. Don't they know anything? Is it any wonder we're regarded as xenophobic?
;)
1
FollowupID: 870648

Reply By: Member - PhilD_NT - Sunday, Jun 12, 2016 at 22:23

Sunday, Jun 12, 2016 at 22:23
While it doesn't excuse all of their actions it should be noted that the linked article doesn't contain the following comment that was in the actual newspaper on the 9th of June.

"The track was closed to the public, but when the duo arrived the gate had been damaged and left open".

There was no info as to whether there was any signage present to state that the road was closed but it was noted that the matter of the damaged gate had been passed on to Parks & Wildlife.
AnswerID: 601268

Reply By: Malcom M - Monday, Jun 13, 2016 at 06:30

Monday, Jun 13, 2016 at 06:30
No one has made the link back to the hire company pumping tourists into the interior with totally inadequate training in outback survival and basic vehicle operation.
You should not be able to hire 4x4's without some basic training or show a government accredited training certificate.
AnswerID: 601273

Reply By: Ron N - Monday, Jun 13, 2016 at 11:24

Monday, Jun 13, 2016 at 11:24
Malcolm is right. The Hire company should supply all the necessary information to ensure the tourists are adequately informed about what to do in dire situations, where to look for road and track information, and how to properly operate the vehicle.

Vast numbers of tourists arrive in Australia totally uninformed about our extreme conditions, the peculiar dangers of rural Australia, the heat level, and the remoteness of many areas. They simply need to be brought up to speed before being let loose.

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 601281

Follow Up By: Life Member-Doug T NSW - Monday, Jun 13, 2016 at 11:48

Monday, Jun 13, 2016 at 11:48
G'day Ron, one could say the same about us Aussies when we go to Countries like USA and Europe, where conditions can be just the opposite with extreme cold , do the wrong thing there and you freeze to death, I have driven in USA in January up over Bighorn Pass into Buffalo, the road is around the 2900m , I was driving a Chevy Malibu that had Front wheel drive so that was a help, other than that the road was kept open by snow ploughs and as one does here , drive to the conditions. My recent trips to Germany have been in the Northern Summer .


.
gift by Daughter

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

3
FollowupID: 870680

Follow Up By: Ron N - Tuesday, Jun 14, 2016 at 09:44

Tuesday, Jun 14, 2016 at 09:44
Doug, you're not wrong there. I've only ever seen snow once in my life, and I wouldn't have a clue how to deal with snowbanks and black ice and dizzying heights.

One the highest roads in the U.S. is Trail Ridge Rd, (U.S. Hwy 34), through the Rocky Mts in Colorado.

Trail Ridge Rd runs to 12,183 feet (3,714M) - and most Aussies would be gasping for breath in that thin air.

It's aviation law, that as a pilot, you must use supplemental oxygen if you fly more than 30 minutes at cabin pressure altitudes of 12,500 feet.

Trail Ridge Rd is a stunning drive (see the video below, it's best in full screen), but the warning signs are large and blunt.

On this drive, you need to be aware of rapidly changing weather and road conditions at those heights, and you need to be aware of the dangers of avalanches and unstable snowbanks.

Plonk an Outback Aussie into this high country wihout any advice, instructions or training, and they could just as easily get into trouble through lack of experience, as overseas tourists do here.

Dangerous roads of North America

Video - Trail Ridge Rd - opening of the pass, early Summer

Cheers, Ron.
1
FollowupID: 870712

Follow Up By: Life Member-Doug T NSW - Tuesday, Jun 14, 2016 at 10:12

Tuesday, Jun 14, 2016 at 10:12
Ron, thanks for the links, amazing country, hey I see the green Jeep in the video, I passed one same color but a hard top heading into Orange over the Weekend, Instantly the thought of GRASSHOPPER came to mind.... We had the Garrat 6029 Steam train in town over the weekend, wow it was fantastic , if you can access my Facebook which is open to all you will find some videos ,
When I was in USA June 2000 I travelled I-70 from LA to Denver , that went into The Eisenhower Tunnel at 11,158 ft . , The tunnel carries Interstate 70 traffic under the Continental Divide in the Rocky Mountains. it is one of the highest vehicular tunnels in the world
.
gift by Daughter

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 870714

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)