How to successfully wash diesel out of clothes

Submitted: Monday, Jun 20, 2016 at 21:44
ThreadID: 132826 Views:4543 Replies:14 FollowUps:9
This Thread has been Archived
Hubby fitting a fuel filter managed to get soaked in diesel from head to toe.
Have tried baking soda, coke a cola and washing in hot water for hours. ( Google ideas) They still reek.
Any dead set ways that actually work would be much appreciated.
By the way, he is now scrubbed clean courtesy of this faithful wife giving him a good old fashioned scrub with detergent.
Christine
Back Expand Un-Read 1 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Scrubby (VIC) - Monday, Jun 20, 2016 at 22:18

Monday, Jun 20, 2016 at 22:18
G`day Christine,

If you can get the Degreaser that "soopa sheep" sell, it`s about $2 a pressure pack can red in colour, I reckon it would do the job.
I use it for heaps of different things from softening / cleaning paint brushes to removing the red outback dust/mud stains on the rubber and trims on the c/van and vehicle, as a hand cleaner, silicon remover prior to it being finally set, glue remover after undoing sticky tape , etc. etc.. etc.
I have cleaned oily rags with it prior to washing them.
Just rinse with water or maybe wash with soapy water first.

Scrubby.
I don`t know where i`m going but i`m enjoying the journey.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 601672

Follow Up By: Ron N - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 10:11

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 10:11
Scrubby- You'd need to be a bit careful with what you used that stuff on - it contains a small amount of caustic soda and it could be quite detrimental to some types of clothing.

However, it is a pretty effective cleaner, though. It certainly cuts through the oily grime.

Cheers, Ron.
0
FollowupID: 871208

Follow Up By: Member Kerry W (WA) - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 10:37

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 10:37
Not to mention degreasers are quite toxic and will defat your skin - worse than the Diesel.
Kerry W (Qld)
Security is mostly a superstition. It doesnt exist in nature. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.
-Helen Keller

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 871211

Reply By: Member - rondesron - Monday, Jun 20, 2016 at 23:29

Monday, Jun 20, 2016 at 23:29
Dry cleaning. Worked for me
AnswerID: 601675

Reply By: Notso - Monday, Jun 20, 2016 at 23:40

Monday, Jun 20, 2016 at 23:40
Get yourself a nice hot camp fire then roll up all the clothes with diesel on em. Then chuck them in the fire and burn them!
AnswerID: 601677

Follow Up By: Member - Christine and Lindsay - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 07:15

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 07:15
Thought of that!
0
FollowupID: 871204

Reply By: Ron N - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 00:19

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 00:19
Christine - Coles sell a stain remover in a white 500ml spray bottle, called "Ultra Stain Remover plus Prewash for everyday use".

They also sell an Ultra brand concentrated laundry detergent, which is perfumed to a certain degree.

I hang my diesel or petrol stained overalls on the line (my wife can smell one single drop of petrol or diesel on me from 10 metres away) - then I turn the Ultra Stain Remover spray nozzle to "spray" (there is also a "stream" position), and spray an even coating of the stain remover all over the affected areas.

Leave the clothes for a few minutes, then place in the washing machine, add a scoopful of Ultra Concentrated laundry detergent in the hottest water you can organise (even if it means pouring a couple of kettlefuls of boiling water into the washing machine) - and then wash on the Heavy Soil wash cycle.

We have a Fisher & Paykel 8kg top load washing machine, and it does a good job of getting filthy overalls clean on the Heavy Soil wash cycle using both these Coles wash products.
The Ultra stain remover spray is not expensive, it's about $2 a bottle, and the Ultra concentrated laundry detergent is about $4 a kg.

If all the above fails, I'd suggest you get some citrus oil stain remover, lay the overalls out on a concrete pad, spray the citrus oil stain remover on them, give them a water spray, then a scrub with an industrial broom - and then hit them with a hot water pressure washer.

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 601678

Reply By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 08:27

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 08:27
After a good wash, hang them out on the line in the sun for a week or so. Even the most expensive decreasing pre-wash sprays don't do enough. But by the time you have purchased a few products that didn't do the job, you could have bought new clothes for the price. Hence Notso has the best idea :O



Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 601679

Follow Up By: Ron N - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 10:08

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 10:08
Yeah, MH and Notso have the final solution - although you wouldn't want to be paying the full retail price for overalls!

However, as an interesting aside, I went into my local Masters store (Bayswater, W.A.) late last week,and found a "specials" table where they were throwing out good quality heavy-duty cotton overalls for $5.00!!

They were originally marked at $56.00! The sizes were a bit limited, they only had 87M, 92L and 112XL. Fortunately, 92L is a good fit on me.

They are "Hardwick" brand. On the Masters online website, they are marked at either $15.00 or $20.00 - only in Chullora store.
I have no idea why they were throwing them out for $5 in Bayswater - but I bought 5 pairs for myself, and 4 pairs for a mate - so we're right for overalls, for a fair while now! [:-)

Cheers, Ron.
0
FollowupID: 871207

Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 14:19

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 14:19
Yes I agree with Judy, I solve a lot of smelly washing problems with a few days hanging on a line in the hot WA summer sunshine! Not going to get the same results in this weather just now however...
Or, just dedicate this set of clothes for future fuel filter changes and retire them from social use.
Michelle Martin
Marketing & Customer Support
I.T. Beyond Pty Ltd / ExplorOz

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

1
FollowupID: 871216

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 14:29

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 14:29
A bit of rain, a bit of sun and a bit or wind should all help Michelle. Will a man EVER where dirty clothes for a dirty job? Usually the newest ones that day :roll:
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 871217

Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 14:41

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 14:41
Yep you're right on both!
And don't even start on the teenage BO - nothing gets that out except for sunshine.
Michelle Martin
Marketing & Customer Support
I.T. Beyond Pty Ltd / ExplorOz

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 871218

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 14:45

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 14:45
That one leaves a bleached patch. I used to go berserk when my elder sister used to borrow my clothes >:(
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 871219

Reply By: Dion - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 15:16

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 15:16
I were a submariner, having clothes smelling of diesel was part and parcel of the job.
AnswerID: 601693

Reply By: Ron N - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 15:32

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 15:32
Is it just me - or increased sensitisation as I get older? - but I personally believe todays diesel smells a lot worse than it did, say 40-50 yrs ago.

I never used to mind the smell of diesel in the 60's, 70's and early 80's, it was aromatic, but not altogether unpleasant. I used to hand pump and consume a hundred or two hundred of litres a day with work equipment.

However, the diesel of today seems to have a lot stronger and more disagreeable odour, than it used to have.

Perhaps it's the newer refining processes where sulphur is almost completely removed from todays diesel, and other ingredients are added to improve lubricity - but whatever it is, I reckon the stuff has got a lot smellier.

Cheers, Ron
AnswerID: 601694

Reply By: noggins - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 20:09

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 20:09
Usually when you've tried all the other ways the diesel is set into the material.

I used to wash my work overalls in sunshine dish washing liquid.

The theory was that if it cuts grease off the kitchen stuff a pair of overalls should be push over.

Mainly it worked but for stubborn stuff mixed with black grease and lagging black ( from the mines ) wouldn't shift out would come the sugar soap and it would get a good dose of both.
So maybe try a double dose of dish washer powder / solvent as it has a high acidic content, to remove those stubborn greases and stuff ( according to the adds )


Mind you there were some that became fire starters too .

Ron
AnswerID: 601705

Reply By: Lex M - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 23:50

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 23:50
You didn't say what sort of fabric. If it's synthetic, dip in metho and throw in the washing machine. The metho relaxes the synthetic fibres so substance washes out.
AnswerID: 601720

Reply By: Member - Christine and Lindsay - Wednesday, Jun 22, 2016 at 11:00

Wednesday, Jun 22, 2016 at 11:00
Thanks everyone. Seems to be sorted. Tried a bit of everything. Leather belt still reeks though
AnswerID: 601727

Follow Up By: Ron N - Wednesday, Jun 22, 2016 at 11:37

Wednesday, Jun 22, 2016 at 11:37
Christine - Try spraying the belt with a 50/50 solution of water and white vinegar, leave for a minute or two, then wipe dry.
Sprinkling the belt liberally with baking soda, leaving it for a couple of hours, then wiping clean, is another option.
You could also try wiping the belt down with rubbing alcohol (Woolies and Chemist Warehouse sells it as Isocol). Be careful with the alcohol, just try a small area first, as it may remove any dye applied to the belt.

Cheers, Ron.
0
FollowupID: 871254

Reply By: Alloy c/t - Wednesday, Jun 22, 2016 at 16:38

Wednesday, Jun 22, 2016 at 16:38
CT 18 truck wash !! Soak offending in a bucket of water with 1/2 cup of truck wash for an hour or so , then article's and the water into the washing machine , normal wash cycle , prodigal sons work clothes alway covered in grease ,oil and diesel come up like new and no diesel smell ...
AnswerID: 601731

Reply By: Tony F8 - Thursday, Jun 23, 2016 at 13:01

Thursday, Jun 23, 2016 at 13:01
Plain old dishwashing detergent will do the job, although it may be a bit harder to get out now, after the dish washing detergent, give a wash in wool wash and there is no need to rinse the clothes after that.
AnswerID: 601753

Reply By: Member - Young Nomads - Thursday, Jun 23, 2016 at 22:56

Thursday, Jun 23, 2016 at 22:56
Hi Christine.

We use diluted truckwash and soak it in a bucket for a while(however long you like). rinse it out thoroughly, then put it through the washing machine with your normal detergent..removes grease and all sorts of "stuff" off your work clothes..?CT18 I think.(green).
Removes in ground red dirt from canvas too. Great stuff.
Cheers
Robyn
AnswerID: 601767

Reply By: member - mazcan - Monday, Jun 27, 2016 at 13:08

Monday, Jun 27, 2016 at 13:08
Hi
i used good old truck wash 10mls in low level wash and with warm water on a shirt that got a dose of diesel then washed it with eucalyptus based clothes detergent separetely both times now ok
cheers
AnswerID: 601868

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)