The Triangle near Woods Point.

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 14:59
ThreadID: 132829 Views:2215 Replies:4 FollowUps:4
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The Triangle in the High country just south of Woods Point is an interesting point from a rain point of view.

-37.64815, 146.12979

It's an intersection on a 3 way point.

Any rain drops that fall a couple of meters to the North or West will eventually end up about 700km to the west in SA via about 2400km in the Golbourne Murray Rivers.

Any rain that falls a couple meters to the South West will end up about 105km to the west in Port Philip Bay via about 250km in the Yarra.

And any rain that falls a few meters to the east ends up 165km to the east at lakes entrance via about 250km in The Thompson and LaTrobe rivers.

It's a lottery for rain that falls right on the triangle I guess.
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Reply By: Notso - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 16:58

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 16:58
In mapping terms it's called a watershed. Sheds water to the lower ground on either side!

1 Metre or two makes a big difference.
AnswerID: 601696

Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 18:10

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 18:10
So that's what a Watershed really means.

Thanks
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Reply By: Dave Trees - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 21:28

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2016 at 21:28
"And any rain that falls a few meters to the east ends up 165km to the east at lakes entrance via about 250km in The Thompson and LaTrobe rivers."

...... or ends up in Port Phillip Bay via the Thomson Reservoir offtake, lots of pipes, your kitchen tap & yet more pipes :o)
AnswerID: 601708

Reply By: Member - Allan L2 - Wednesday, Jun 22, 2016 at 12:18

Wednesday, Jun 22, 2016 at 12:18
Hi Boobook ,
Very interesting, there is a similar situation in the Snowy Mountains just east of Old Adaminaby.

Lake Eucumbene was built to dam the Eucumbene River which fed into the Snowy River & entered the sea at Marlo Vic. The top of spillway adjacent to the dam wall is in fact slightly higher than an area of land in a valley just east of the Old Adaminaby Township approximately fifteen kilometres upstream from the spillway. This would have allowed the water to flow through the valley towards Adaminaby and on into the Murrumbidgee entering the sea at Goolwa S.A. via the Murray rather than over the spillway. A small man made earthen embankment was later built to avoid this situation.

There would not be too many places where one could stand and if it were to rain, the rain dripping off one shoulder would run flow to the east & off the other shoulder to the west of the Great Dividing Range. The embankment can be seen on Google Earth.

36 02 27.32 S 148 44 25.75 E

Cheers,

AnswerID: 601728

Follow Up By: Member - Rod N (QLD) - Wednesday, Jun 22, 2016 at 14:38

Wednesday, Jun 22, 2016 at 14:38
There are probably a number of cases where this would occur along the top of the range.
The top of the Range at Toowoomba is one case in point where to the east the water flows to the east to the Brisbane river and to the west it flows west to the Murray/Darling basin.
During the "inland Tsunami" all the rainfall which caused it flowed west to the Condamine and on to the Darling etc. None of that water affected the devastating floods around Grantham and Brisbane, that all came from rainfall on the eastern slopes of the range.
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Follow Up By: Notso - Thursday, Jun 23, 2016 at 16:07

Thursday, Jun 23, 2016 at 16:07
There are Watersheds everywhere in reality. The Murrumbidgee and Lachlan Basins share a watershed for over 700 kilometres. Anything that falls North flows into the Lachlan, and anything South flows into the Murrumbidgee. And of course then if we get enough water in the Lachlan it flows out into the Murrumbidgee.about 45 kilometres, as the crow flies, North East of Balranald.
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Follow Up By: Member - Allan L2 - Thursday, Jun 23, 2016 at 16:40

Thursday, Jun 23, 2016 at 16:40
Hi Notso,
Yes you are correct & I am aware that there are many areas that fit the description “Watershed” in our country. The point I was making in my reply was that in this case the section of that watershed was manmade, very narrow and well defined unlike most others. You can literally stand with one foot either side of the Great Dividing Range.
Cheers,
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Reply By: Robin Miller - Thursday, Jun 23, 2016 at 12:41

Thursday, Jun 23, 2016 at 12:41
I have just been checking out a new ECO size Foxwing ,and discovered that its not very useful in wind blown rain.

I think I can say that the watershedding from every direction ended up in one concentrated spot.

Under my foxwing.
Robin Miller

Member
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