iveco twin cab 4x4

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 17:45
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the son in law and I are looking at the 4x4 iveco 5tonner? which needs a LT licence in Vic. Looks impressive to setup as an outback rig. Does anyone have an opinion on this vechile, yep at $105k, then my own back design, is still comparable to buying a series200 landy then having to tow a trailer. Have looked at the iveco forum with no real feedback, so hopefully some here has one with a comment.
location - Warragul -Victoria
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Reply By: Alloy c/t - Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 17:51

Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 17:51
Was a recent write up on them on one of the online 4x4 magazines , lot cheaper than a Tug and bush tracker with "real" 4x4 capability ….. look into places that do Ambulance fit outs etc for design and build , cheaper yet stronger than c/van builders.
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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 18:16

Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 18:16
There are several 4WD motorhome builders converting them.
All Terrain Warriors, http://www.allterrainwarriors.com.au/
Travel Trucks, http://www.traveltrucks.com.au/ and others.
Look good on paper, have heard some reports of overheating transfer cases. Popular platform in Europe.
It would go places a Bushtracker will never go.

Lots of good information here...http://www.manins.net.au/truck_camper/

Cheers,
Peter
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Reply By: Les - PK Ranger - Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 18:24

Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 18:24
Garry, was look at the Iveco range the other day, mostly the Daily 4x4, but also noted the Eurocargo 4x4 which you could fitout very smartly.

This is the one you're looking at ?

Might not be as easy in desert dunes or tighter tracks of the high country as much as the shorter wheel base Daily, but would be an awesome tourer !!
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Follow Up By: GarryR - Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 18:47

Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 18:47
was looking at the Daily 4x4 twin cab. Have seen a body that I like build locally in Gippsland that is of good quality but not cheap. My cousin had a body built from this firm (MFI body builders in Warragul). It was more an interest in the tug. Have heard of braking issues in the high country with long braking periods. I was considering the 5tonner as I have licence for heavy transport vechiles. I do not travel high country much, a we are both from desert region and love the outback and plains over the mountains. The cook can also drive this combo with her licence. This vechile comes in 2 combo's - 4.5 tonne on std licence or 5.4t on LT licence. We were looking at the higher rating.
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 18:51

Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 18:51
Garry, yeah I really like the Daily, pro'ly just in the std 4.5t GVM would do me :)
Re braking, I read that some FUSO light trucks use the same engine, and have an exhaust braking setup . . . apparently Iveco say they can't fit this to the engine, but would be very handy on long descents.
Maybe it can be adapted from the FUSO spare parts dept to retrofit ?
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Follow Up By: GarryR - Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 19:06

Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 19:06
yes, I believe that exhaust brake is fitted only in Europe, along with rear disc brakes. Wheels size is also an issue as it comes std with 17.5" rims. Iveco Dandenong state that it can be retrofitted with 17" super singles available from Qld, which is good for tyres here. Apparently these vechiles are assembled in Dandenong Vic to customers specs. There is a new vechile being released in September this year, with a test day available near Geelong for prospective customers. Will be hanging out for that day, as my son in law and myself are keen. The hilux has done me proud, but just looking for future upgrade.
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Reply By: Member - John - Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 20:24

Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 20:24
Garry, pretty sure MFI in Warragul had a dual cab one of these in the other day fitting a camper to it. Maybe worth a call to Dallas and ask for your contact details to passed on to the owner, he maybe able to help you with your questions/queries. Was a good looking set up too..........
PS. When I replied to this post there was no replies, when I posted there are a few, even one from you about MFI, LOL
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 22:00

Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 22:00
Saw this example at Big Red Bash last year, along with a 2nd one camped nearby.



Up until that time these were on my Shortlist, together with Landcruiser 79 ute, for a new vehicle, that could legally carry my slide on camper. Bit naive of me I suppose, but didn't realise just how "tall" they are. Not much shorter than a Kenworth. :-) Be good for highway and off-road, but I also wanted it for a bit of town work too. Bought the 'cruiser........

Alan Whiting has a good video or two on YouTube about these, that are worth watching........maybe I should have bought one?

Bob

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Reply By: mountainman - Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 23:12

Tuesday, Jun 28, 2016 at 23:12
Go all out and get a unimog.
70k youd grab the one off the gumtree site and have 30-35k to blow on the back camper setup.
its a dualcab
fully restored and sound proofed as much as youd get a unimog.
be a weapon to start off with
the chassis in the iveco arent all that thick

cheers
best of luck on the choice
and post up your purchase , build
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Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 17:02

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 17:02
Australian Army had the taxpayers writing the cheques to foot the maintenance bill...

They look cheap to buy, but ongoing cost will be the killer!

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 11:38

Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 11:38
Baz is right on the mark. Not only the massive cost of European parts, which makes you weep every time you have to buy something (and I've never seen anything like Iveco prices! How about $1000 for an alloy water outlet on a 6cyl Iveco truck engine??) - but there's also the problem of constant changes to European designs that also make you gnash your teeth.

If you thought the Japs were bad for constant design changes, the Europeans make them look like rank amateurs.

You will get 3 different designs in every part, as they fiddle with changes - and you only find out, when the wrong part arrives, and you're 500kms East of the Black Stump.

The European engineers also always seem to manage to have 5 parts in a component, where the Americans or the Japs will use 3 parts to do the same job.

I'm reliably informed that the cost of a 'Mog gearbox replacement is well into a 5-figure sum.

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 12:43

Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 12:43
Saw a Unimog next to BP roadhouse in Cloncurry, with near side rear axle and associated parts removed. Don't know how long it had been there, but 10 days later it was still there.

Seemed to be a long time to be waiting for parts, especially as the 'Curry is a mining town, and freight arrives almost every day.

Bob

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Follow Up By: OutBack Wanderers - Friday, Jul 01, 2016 at 20:45

Friday, Jul 01, 2016 at 20:45
That response did it for me, thanx Bob Y and Ron N

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Reply By: eaglefree - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 00:13

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 00:13
Gee my memory of my job of test driving unimogs at Puckapunyal left me with not much desire of cruising the highways. But awesome off road of course.
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Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 07:48

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 07:48
Caught up with a party of three Ivecos at Durba spring last month, the owners love them, having moved on from cruisers and patrols.
The Iveco website blurb lists some very impressive info on the 4x4 configurations:
They are built on a truck chassis
Are fitted with a IVECO FIC 3.0 litre 4 cylinder 16 valve turbo diesel engine that puts out 170 hp/125 KWs between 3000 to 3500 rpms and 400 newtons of torque between 1250-3000 rpms
Has permanent all wheel drive with three available differential locks (front, rear, and central); it has 24 forward and 4 reverse gear ratios (now that’s a lot of gears)
Feature a:
o 3.4 metre wheelbase and an overall length of 5.43 metres
o 4.49 tonne GVM with an option of 5.5 tonne GVM
o 36deg departure angle, 50deg approach angle and ramp over 31deg
o fording depth up to 700mm
o 12 volt system with a 140 amp alternator
Suspension: front has parabolic 3 leaf springs with hydraulic telescopic shock absorbers and reinforced 24mm stabiliser bar and rear has parabolic 4 leaf springs, with hydraulic telescopic shock absorbers and reinforced 28mm stabiliser bar
Heated, suspended and fully adjustable driver’s seat
Overhead console with storage shelf
And all the usual other gear including electric windows, cruise control, door pockets and two cup and two bottle holders.
Service intervals are 40,000 kms.
There is a lot of difference between
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Follow Up By: Member - John - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 07:58

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 07:58
Phil, wow that is serious bull bar. It certainly does nothing for the approach angle, as does the side steps for ramp over. It must have been an interesting trip..........
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Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 08:15

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 08:15
Hi John Yes a serious BB.
They went to specialist bull bar manufacturer Kentweld Engineering Victoria who experimented to get it right. The bars are made of alloy and weigh 38 kgs including winch mount.

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Follow Up By: Flighty ( WA ) - Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 11:23

Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 11:23
Phil
At only 38 kg it must be extremely thin ali I'm thinking.
But with the shapes and angles on it am thinking still reasonably strong.
And a roo at 80 kph would still do some serious damage with costly repairs
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Follow Up By: Phil B (WA) - Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 19:59

Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 19:59
Yes it does sound a bit light on - having said that hitting a roo at 80 kph with a steel bar would create damage.
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Follow Up By: Flighty ( WA ) - Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 21:28

Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 21:28
Without being critical Phil, my steel barwork has sustained numerous roo "hits" up to 95 kph and also emus and a very small clip on a cow outside Kumarina at 60 kph.
All resulting in zero panel damage on the 2 cruisers it's been on, only driving lights destroyed which is par for the work I do.
Bar was fabricated by me to suit my requirements, and albeit heavy it has filled my needs for almost 12 years without damage.
that is my requirement in the west as you well know, and your extensive travels only prove that, with much jealousy on my behalf I must say.
Barwork on these units as I said are very well made considering the current "requirements" they look quite substanstial, but maybe an "aftermarket steel unit" without naming and the exhaust tube used in their manufacture would leave not much desire for me to purchase I'm afraid
Cheers & Regards
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Follow Up By: Phil B (WA) - Friday, Jul 01, 2016 at 05:23

Friday, Jul 01, 2016 at 05:23
Thanks Flighty, you've got yourself a terrific bar there. Imagine hitting a roo at 95 kph with an alloy bar - gulp.

My old 80 series originally had a alloy bar - a wing broke off when I hit a roo at approx 70kph. I've had steel ever since.

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Reply By: Malcom M - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 09:08

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 09:08
There is a few build threads for these on MySwag
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Reply By: Rick (S.A.) - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 12:13

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 12:13
I also have considered same, for desert travel with 3 to 6 people. A significant benefit of a unit like this is that there is no need for a trailer. I'd fit a custom canopy (not a sleeping canopy, just storage).

Here are some figures which may need to be factored to make the unit a real bush beast:

GVM 4495 kg.
Payload 2655 kg.
By way of comparison a 70 series dual cab Tojo has 1085 Kg payload, Mazda BT 50 Dual cab 1139 kg, 200 series Tojo wagon has 715 kg.


Iveco Daily 4x4 $108,332 plus on road costs
suspension up grade $1,350
custom canopy $12,000
canopy fit out $3,000
snorkel $750
tyres & rims $5,150
roofrack $1,500
window tint $350
towbar $1,120 may not be necessary
L R fuel tank 160 L $3,550 retaining 90 L OE tank
solar panels $2,000
bullbar $1,590
engine chip/remap $1,695
2nd batt etc $2,650
Misc (winch + spare tyre mounts etc) $4,995
diff & transfer case breathers $590
seat frame reduction $810
water tank 185 L $1,970

total $151,432

Makes it a serious contender, IMHO, if starting from scratch & with a healthy bank balance.

For what it's worth, a Mazda BT 50 dual cab (as near as spit to this fit out) would cost $111,314; a 70 series dual cab $134,880; and a 200 series would have to tow a trailer and would cost $148,625, including a well built trailer.

For me there are still some questions which need to be answered, like:

* Wheel track (i.e. width) - is it compatable with outback tracks which are OK with Tojo, Mazda etc 4WD's?
* Body width may be an issue on scrubby tracks, as might height.
* Is it easy to drive or do you have to drive every inch of the way, like in a Tojo 70 series?
* I presume wuith an engine re-map/chip, torgue & power will be OK?
* What is the ride like up front, sitting what looks to be like just behind the front axle?

See these sites as well:

http://www.goannatracks.com
/Home/Super_Single_Rims_for_Canter,_Isuzu_%26_Iveco.html
http://www.traveltrucks.com.au/explorer-work-module


Interesting stuff, eh?
AnswerID: 601951

Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 17:08

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 17:08
Starting with a clean sheet is not a bad way to go. Interesting the number you have on the 79 Series Dual Cab - not too far out on what I have spent - I come in less than this, but number is ballpark.

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
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Reply By: Rangiephil - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 13:35

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 13:35
Have a look on the AULRO forum as a couple of members have actually bought and converted Ivecos.
They have had quite a bit of trouble with them although they love them.
Apparently the brakes are so bad that one bloke has designed and built a brake upgrade which is now commercially available.
Also a few have dropped their transfer case most notably on the Canning, and Iveco sent some techs out with a replacement to fix it!!! I don't think they will do that too often.LOL.
Another problem reported was that the radiator jumped from its mounts on the Canning.
It sounds to me a bit of a half baked development process..
Regards Philip A
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Follow Up By: Rangiephil - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 13:40

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 13:40
If you go to the AULRO forum there is even a category on them albeit with only 2 threads, as it is recent.
If you go to the AULRO forum then to the bottom left of the page there is a specific AULRO google seach.
Regards Philip A
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Reply By: Member - Jim B8 - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 13:46

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 13:46
I had one, sold it a year later, I lost $100,000 on the sale, but was a very happy man when it drove out.

I now have a Mazda.

At least the Japanese have pride when it comes to warranty.
AnswerID: 601955

Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 17:23

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 17:23
Methinks you need to look up where vehicles are actually manufactured with said statement ' Japanese have pride when it comes to warranty ' , one of the biggest recent outcries on this forum was about a Nissan Dual cab with a dud motor , Japanese ? Nah the motor is actually made in SPAIN .
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Follow Up By: skulldug - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 18:12

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 18:12
No support from me for Japanese manufactures honouring their warranties. I had to battle for my consumer rights from Mr Yota.

Can you elaborate on loosing $100k?

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Follow Up By: Member - Jim B8 - Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 05:18

Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 05:18
I sold mine cheap at 30-40,000 klms. I had 2 x major brake meltdowns on steep ranges, one cost me $10,000 to repair the front end, 28 days off the road, and "no release before payment" . Both almost cost us our lives. Also transfer case overheating at anything over 70 klms per hour, I fitted external oil coolers, it didnt work. And no warranty to speak of, they stuck to the "its been modified" approach. And from what I read on this forum, there are a lot of people out there planning lots of mods ha ha.
Tyres and rims equals "warranty issue" Who knows, maybe it was that I changed the radio? The only contact with the factory was their lawyers letter telling me they would see me in court. As a consumer, you can only contact the dealer, not the factory, when it comes to warranty
So I did what any consumer can do, I sold, and didnt look back. The 100k was setup cost less sale price. My Mazda/Ford seems fine, warts and all. Consumers always win eventually.
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Follow Up By: skulldug - Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 08:54

Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 08:54
Jim,

Sorry to hear about your very bad run with this vehicle. You would be welcome to sit around the fire with me and a small group of mates, all of whom have had a major failure with their Prados.

For me in particular, it was an enormous battle to get past Toyota's stone wall customer defence system.

In your case, I would have thought that modifications would need to cause the failure before they could void warranty.

I can understand why you walked away though. Life is too short.
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Reply By: Member - mark D18 - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 16:57

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 16:57
Garry

The thing I would be worried about the most is long term reliability.
Are they really suitable for Australian conditions . ( BIG QUESTION MARK )



AnswerID: 601960

Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 18:22

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 18:22
I don't understand what "Australian conditions" are in this context.
Most European "expedition" vehicles operate in a much wider range of conditions than we do in Australia, both in temperature, roads and altitude. Their first trip usually takes them to Morocco.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome
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Follow Up By: Member - mark D18 - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 18:40

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 18:40
Do they get back from Morroco !!
That's the million dollar Question Peter.




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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 22:22

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 22:22
Silly question....... :)

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 14:55

Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 14:55
"Do they get back from Morroco !!
That's the million dollar Question Peter"

Yes! - of course! On the back of a tilt-tray! LOL

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: GarryR - Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 16:42

Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 16:42
I am led to believe that they are used extensively in the African countries, similar to Aust conditions, with mud, sand, and temperatures from one extreme to another.
Some great comments from all. Cost and upgrading is also worth noting but, when I consider what I have spent on the Hilux ( with no regret ) and what I could outlay again is what I need to chew on. The lux will still remain in the stable, as other family members will start to venture out.
location - Warragul -Victoria
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Reply By: Crackles - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 19:24

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 19:24
We're running a couple of Iveco single cabs with service bodies at work & have had quite a few nagging issues. One is on it's 3rd turbo, drinks oil, transfer case issue the same problem another one had at the Beyond Buckland event. Tyres on the 5 tonner are near impossible to get & over $800 each meaning you'll be up for different wheels/tyres next time. (Originals don't wear that well on the road anyway.
Personally I think the height to get in/out, roll over potential & speed limited to 100 doesn't lend it'self to touring Australia & the increased cost to modify & service means hands in pocket all the time..
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 19:32

Wednesday, Jun 29, 2016 at 19:32
Good to get peoples first hand experiences.
Lots of thought needed before laying out near $100k for a basic platform to work on.
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Reply By: 9900Eagle - Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 05:15

Thursday, Jun 30, 2016 at 05:15
Here is a test drive done by owner driver. In the actual original editorial he was not happy about the brakes at all, this was not reported in the video. Anyway here is the Video
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Friday, Jul 01, 2016 at 00:40

Friday, Jul 01, 2016 at 00:40
9900Eagle - Unfortunately, test drives don't show up problems that appear after a period of ownership, and are quite limited in many respects.

In the "Gone Bush" website, the owner states the Iveco 4x4 engine is the same one fitted to the smaller Fuso trucks, and claims this is testament to the engines strength and reliability.

Unfortunately, this is not the case at all. What the true scenario is, is that Mitsubishi Fuso Truck and Bus Corporation (MFTBC) is now largely European owned.
Daimler AG owns 89.29% of MFTBC shares and various Mitsubishi group companies own 10.71% of MFTBC shares. MFTBC is an integral part of the Daimler Trucks Division of Daimler AG.

The FUSO trucks are built in Japan, in India, and in Europe.

Daimler chose the Iveco engine for the simple reason it was a convenient European engine, and it is built to EU specs, and EU emission levels.

It's drawing a long bow to say that Daimler AG chose the engine for the Fuso truck line because it was a superior and more robust engine to anything else available.

The engine in the Iveco 4x4 is known as the SOFIM engine. The Sofim - (Societa Franco Italiana Motori) was originally a joint diesel engine enterprise established between Fiat, Saviem (Renault) and Alfa Romeo on the 13th of September 1974 - and this company was bought by Iveco in 1981.

The SOFIM manufacturing plant is located in Foggia in Southern Italy, and today, is Fiat Powertrain Technologies largest engine plant.

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Friday, Jul 01, 2016 at 07:58

Friday, Jul 01, 2016 at 07:58
Ron, it is pretty plain that a test drive doesn't relate to the longevity of the vehicle or do I have to spell that out for everyone before I post a link.

What it does is let the person who posted, have a look at the vehicle being tested. I guess that is part of what he wanted or am I out of touch.



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Follow Up By: Ron N - Friday, Jul 01, 2016 at 09:55

Friday, Jul 01, 2016 at 09:55
Well, he just said he was looking for feedback, I was under the impression if you're contemplating purchase, then, feedback about problems incurred during ownership, the origins of the design, and reliability - are important parts of the equation that you'd like to know - as much as how the vehicle drives.

Cheers, Ron.
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Reply By: Rangiephil - Friday, Jul 01, 2016 at 11:29

Friday, Jul 01, 2016 at 11:29
Just a comment about "used in Africa"
In my month in ZA, Namibia, Botswana , and Zambia I didn't see a single one.

Lots of Land Rovers though, and a Ford Falcon ute! and of course lots of the scummiest Land Cruisers you have ever seen. I recall one that was a cut down viewing ute that had broken the Apillar clean away from the firewall.

The tour groups now seem to use mostly 8 Tonne 2 wheel drive Toyota trucks with a custom body, as they found the old merc4x4s too expensive to upkeep.

In any case even the dirt the roads in ZA and Namibia are excellent, and far better than OZ as they have teams of graders going all the time complete with trailer and second wife( who is chosen by the first wife to avoid AIDS)
Regards Philip A


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