Ute loading

Submitted: Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 11:38
ThreadID: 133074 Views:4822 Replies:13 FollowUps:20
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I don't know what all the fuss is about! :-)
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Reply By: Michael H9 - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 11:59

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 11:59
It looks wet too. He's used the other thick strap to hold his esky and a second lighter grade one as an extra on the bale.
It was mentioned on another site, there's weight and there's moving weight. A 2kg brick sitting on your foot doesn't hurt, but drop it on your foot and see the damage. The same thing happens with big weight bouncing up and down due to road conditions, acceleration and braking. That thing must weigh around 500kgs?
AnswerID: 602747

Follow Up By: Lachie - Wednesday, Jul 27, 2016 at 08:50

Wednesday, Jul 27, 2016 at 08:50
The weight of the bale would be 350kg or less. 3 bales of lucerne hay with the correct range of moisture of 18% Would bring it to that range. So if it was just grass hay pressed dry it would be far lighter.
By the flat bottom it is been sitting for awhile and probably wasn't pressed overly tight.
Lachie
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FollowupID: 872450

Reply By: Member - John - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 12:13

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 12:13
This is what he used to drive.................

John and Jan

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AnswerID: 602748

Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 12:48

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 12:48
He's got a darn sight more of his load articles tied down, than I see on most utes or trucks, every day!

The worrying part is probably the fact that none of his Chinese straps meet any Australian load restraint standard.

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 602750

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 12:56

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 12:56
How can you tell from the photo? Is it a colour etc?
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 17:19

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 17:19
Phil, 98% of the ratchet straps sold in Australia in hardware stores are made in China. The only ones I know of, that are not, is Aerofast brand, made in NZ. Very few of the Chinese ratchet straps meet Australian load restraint Standards.

The biggest blue strap has a partly-visible name on it, but it's certainly not Aerofast. I've regularly picked up ratchet straps to buy, in hardware stores, only to find they don't meet Australian load restraint Standards - so I put them back.
All load restraints (ropes and straps) used on road vehicles, must meet Australian Standard AS/NZS4380, since April 2015.

The lifting/sling companies are among the few retailers that ensure that their ratchet straps do meet AS/NZS4380 standard - and they're clearly marked as such.

Cheers, Ron.
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FollowupID: 872393

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 17:28

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 17:28
Therefore we shouldn't say that "none of his Chinese straps meet any Australian load restraint standard". If we are going to use definitive statements and claims then we should be 100% positive that we are absolutely correct.

No doubt most came from Gubbings but being in the country they may well have come from a "proper" store that sells only "propper" items.

I thought for a minute that a colour meant something bad and that my blue ones were trash.

Phil

Back to the footy.
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FollowupID: 872394

Follow Up By: gbc - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 18:38

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 18:38
Your standard garden variety chinese "grunt" ratchet straps from Bunnings conform to 4380 these days.

There's a blue tag sewn into the strap in the pic so I wouldn't be surprised if he has a newer one.

Visually you would assume that the back of that ute should really be sitting down a bit further than that.
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FollowupID: 872396

Reply By: Member - Roachie - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 13:01

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 13:01
That bale is sitting fairly well towards the back of the tray too.....most of the weight would be behind the rear axle meaning the steering would probably be pretty light....although the ute does LOOK to be sitting fairly level.

He might just want to avoid doing any traffic light drag events..... that towbar hasn't got any little wheels on it to act as "landing gear" in the event he manages to do a wheelie!!

I think he's gone for overkill be adding the second (red) strap. Some people are just too damned careful these days ....hahaha
AnswerID: 602751

Follow Up By: Geoffr17 - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 17:13

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 17:13
The Ute is sitting very level isn''t it. no sag in the rear. I'm concluding its a fake photo
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Follow Up By: disco driver - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 20:56

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 20:56
Nah, it's a Toyota, they can carry anything without overloading
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FollowupID: 872403

Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 13:41

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 13:41
Something's a bit suss, Andrew? How do "they" make round bales with a flat side, so they sit neatly on your ute tray?

Mighty Hilux ute though........

Bob
Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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AnswerID: 602754

Follow Up By: Member - Charlie M (SA) - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 14:01

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 14:01
The round bales flatten out on the bottom, just sitting on the ground. If others were sat on top that would make it even flatter.
That one does not look to have had others stacked on top
Cheers
Charlie
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FollowupID: 872389

Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 17:15

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 17:15
Bob, John Deer make a baler that can produce flat bottomed bales for one of carrying or Hex bales for stacked loads. Would I lie.

That bale looks like it would be good for starting fires or mulch.

Good to see the use of telecom rope on the ladder. Safest tie on the whole load.
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Reply By: Bob R4 - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 13:49

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 13:49
To me it loos like the front is sitting fairly normal, and the back doesn't look too loaded down on the suspension.
If the hay is dry, and it looks more likely to be dry,
I don't see an issue with the load, only with the load police!
AnswerID: 602755

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 13:56

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 13:56
Only unsafe item I can see is all the ratchets are on the offside. Be a lot safer to have them on the near side, especially if doing some extra tightening on side of a highway., where few passing motorists slow down.

Bob

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Can't remember most of it.

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Reply By: howie - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 15:34

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 15:34
maybe ask the driver of this van


oh no you can't, he's dead
AnswerID: 602758

Reply By: eaglefree - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 18:11

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 18:11
Sure it would be wiser loaded if further forward but I think its legal until proven otherwise.

If it is technically legal and I wanted to transport it 300 metres to my horse paddock I'd load it like this. If its a one tonner or 750kg and its underweight. No issue.

I better take cover :)

AnswerID: 602763

Reply By: Member - Blue M - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 18:18

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 18:18
I have a question.
Would anyone out there know how heavy the bale of hay actually weighs?

It may be not as bad as it looks. (Maybe)

Cheers

AnswerID: 602764

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew & Jen - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 18:33

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 18:33
Blue M
I have asked my rural friends that very question. Their response is "It depends on what type of hay"
If it is straw it will be much lighter than lucerne or clover and how much grass is in the mix, and of course, how much moisture.
Anything from 500 to 900+kgs.
Cheers
Andrew
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Follow Up By: Member - Blue M - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 18:50

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 18:50
Thanks for that, as I was courious.
Had a quick look on the net but could mainly find weights in the UK.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 19:05

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 19:05
I've got an identical Hilux with a heavier steel tray, with racks, for a work hack. It's pictured below, carrying a Lincoln Vantage engine-driven welder, that weighs 800kgs.

For the nit-pickers - it did have multiple 2000kg ratchet straps holding it on - this pic was taken just after I'd taken the straps off and was getting ready to unload the welder with a forklift.

IMO, the welder was pretty much a near-capacity load for the Hilux. Even at that, the Hilux isn't sitting down near the bump stops.
It has settled well down from empty position (probably about 100mm, but it still has plenty of suspension travel left.



Cheers, Ron.
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FollowupID: 872399

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew & Jen - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 20:09

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 20:09
Thanks Ron
I guess my amazement - and hence reason for taking the photo - was that the bale is almost entirely aft of the rear axle, in stark contrast to your example of the welder sitting evenly across it. I don't know the nature nor weight of the other gear to the front of the tray.
Cheers
Andrew
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FollowupID: 872401

Follow Up By: splits - Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 20:17

Sunday, Jul 24, 2016 at 20:17
"IMO, the welder was pretty much a near-capacity load for the Hilux. Even at that, the Hilux isn't sitting down near the bump stops.
It has settled well down from empty position (probably about 100mm, but it still has plenty of suspension travel left."

Ron
That photo should be in all the 4wd, camper trailer and caravan magazines. When you fully load a car correctly, it works. Uneven loading doesn't and aftermarket suspension parts are not the answer.
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FollowupID: 872402

Follow Up By: Ron N - Monday, Jul 25, 2016 at 12:07

Monday, Jul 25, 2016 at 12:07
Andrew, we don't know the full story of what the bloke had planned, so it's somewhat pointless to speculate on the loading method, without talking to the ute owner and getting his input.

However, I'll hazard a wild-arse guess, that as the pic was taken in Warialda, the bloke had picked up a cheap single bale locally for his daughters hayburner - he wasn't planning on taking it too far, or too fast - and the weight positioning wasn't having any major effect on handling or steering.

I'd also guess it's a fairly light bale, probably 500 kgs, rather than 900kgs.
The two major problems presented with the load are ...

1. Any heavy load placed behind the rear axle acts as a lever to lift the front end.
In addition, this type of loading acts as a lever to initiate serious oversteer, in the event of sharp steering movements. It really does affect handling to a substantial degree. If the owner didn't have far to go and wasn't getting up to highway speeds, then the loading method is acceptable for the planned journey.

2. The large frontal area of the bale provides a great deal of wind resistance that will flip the bale off if not well secured, and if highway speeds are reached. A strong headwind exacerbates the problem. If the journey planned is short and speed is kept to say 80kmh, there shouldn't be any major problem with his bale loading.

I'd suggest he loaded the bale in the manner shown, because he planned for easy unloading, by merely kicking it off the back of the tray when he arrived at his destination.
It's possible he's a hobby farmer, and he might have minimal heavy-bale-handling equipment, as many hobby farmers don't have too much by way of substantial bale-handling machinery.

Cheers, Ron.
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FollowupID: 872408

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew & Jen - Monday, Jul 25, 2016 at 12:26

Monday, Jul 25, 2016 at 12:26
You could well be on the money there Ron ??
I can't add anymore to the story behind the photo.
Cheers
Andrew
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FollowupID: 872409

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Tuesday, Jul 26, 2016 at 10:39

Tuesday, Jul 26, 2016 at 10:39
Ron N, perfect load position for a single cab, wouldn't try it with a dual cab, or even a space cab, that's the trouble nowadays, dual cabs are really popular, and so easy to load badly.
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FollowupID: 872425

Reply By: Member - shane r1 - Monday, Jul 25, 2016 at 08:58

Monday, Jul 25, 2016 at 08:58
Hey I wonder if the shuttle on the other ute passing by has a strap on it?
The guy with the hay has got his priorities right , you've gotta look after the esky.
It's a good ad for the little hilux!
As far as weight goes , I buy cereal hay in round bales @ 3 to the tonne and 6x3x3 foot squares are about the same. Certainly Lucerne would be a lot heavier.
Cheers
Robbo
AnswerID: 602772

Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Monday, Jul 25, 2016 at 10:48

Monday, Jul 25, 2016 at 10:48
Robbo, where you make up the weight of the Lucerne, is the Lucerne will lighten the load in your pocket quite a bit.
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FollowupID: 872407

Reply By: Member Kerry W (WA) - Monday, Jul 25, 2016 at 11:22

Monday, Jul 25, 2016 at 11:22
Tails not scraping on the ground yet...just a lazy axle!!
Kerry W (Qld)
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AnswerID: 602776

Reply By: Alloy c/t - Tuesday, Jul 26, 2016 at 09:50

Tuesday, Jul 26, 2016 at 09:50
An awful lot of speculation without having all of the facts , unless a lot on here have some sort of magic vision ! Whats under the tarp ? What is immediately in front of the bale that the picture does not show ? For all we know for we cannot see there maybe a dozen bags of cement just behind the cab compensating the weight ….
AnswerID: 602800

Follow Up By: eaglefree - Tuesday, Jul 26, 2016 at 13:05

Tuesday, Jul 26, 2016 at 13:05
It is within normal mind frames to speculate though alloy c/t.

Its only conversation. And we get educated with different opinions.

Besides, as I mentioned previously, if its under weight it isn't a problem but preference would be for it to be further along the tray.

Opinions based on the available information is normal.
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FollowupID: 872433

Reply By: tony_j - Tuesday, Jul 26, 2016 at 10:00

Tuesday, Jul 26, 2016 at 10:00
I reckon the ute is sitting level because of the air bags! :)
AnswerID: 602801

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