Yamaha 1kva

Submitted: Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 11:55
ThreadID: 133117 Views:3149 Replies:7 FollowUps:11
This Thread has been Archived
I have a 1kva Yamaha and just bought a small induction cooker model C202-20D5
Will the gen be able to handle it? Don't want to try till I know.
Thanks in advance.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Rod N (QLD) - Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 12:02

Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 12:02
What is the power requirements for the cooker ie amps or watts?
In any case if the power draw is too high for the Yamaha the overload protection will trip.
AnswerID: 602952

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 12:05

Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 12:05
Annie

You will need to provide more info on the induction cooker - make would help.

If you have a look on the bottom of the cooker, you will find a sticker with the specifications of the unit on it. Take a photo and post it and you will get the answer that you seek.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 872572

Follow Up By: Annie N - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 09:43

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 09:43
Thanks Anthony. Voltage frequency 240 VAC
POWER INPUT 2000 W
0
FollowupID: 872612

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 09:49

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 09:49
Sorry Annie,

Your gennie won't run your cooktop. It simply doesn't have enough power.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 872614

Follow Up By: Member - Rod N (QLD) - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 12:10

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 12:10
For future reference Annie, watts and VA are roughly the same ie 1kva (1000va)= roughly 1kw (1000w). I know these are not exact because power factor affects it but near enough for the layman.
1
FollowupID: 872624

Reply By: Member - rooster350 - Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 15:29

Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 15:29
All those twos in the model no. would lead me to believe that it is 2000w and thus your yammie would not be able to run it, they draw a lot of juice those things.
AnswerID: 602957

Follow Up By: Annie N - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 09:51

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 09:51
Bumma!
Thanks Rooster and everyone who replied to me....
I'm still trying to get accepted with the password I received.
0
FollowupID: 872615

Reply By: Notso - Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 17:36

Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 17:36
I've got a single element Induction Cooker and it draws 1500watts so not likely I'd say.
AnswerID: 602961

Reply By: Member - lyndon NT - Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 23:32

Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 23:32
Heating or cooling anything takes a heap of energy. That model number doesn't show anything up on a Google. As previous poster said. Photo of the spec plate would be handy.
Now is the only time you own
Decide now what you will,
Place faith not in tomorrow
For the clock may then be still

Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 602971

Reply By: Iza B - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 07:06

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 07:06
Just plug it in and try the generator. If the cooker tries to draw more than the genny is capable of, the overload will trip and prevent any damage either way.

I don't like your chances of the 1 KVA being able to do the job.

Iza
AnswerID: 602980

Follow Up By: Annie N - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 09:45

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 09:45
Thanks Iza
0
FollowupID: 872613

Reply By: Paul and Mel - Monday, Aug 01, 2016 at 21:59

Monday, Aug 01, 2016 at 21:59
Even a 2KVA genny will struggle with it. You need at least a 2.5KVA to run it.
AnswerID: 603023

Reply By: MEMBER - Darian, SA - Tuesday, Aug 02, 2016 at 13:00

Tuesday, Aug 02, 2016 at 13:00
Yep...as mentioned, its all in the numbers...power requirement of the appliance will be on the specs placard...usually underneath...and....the 1K Yammie is only happy with 900w continuous supply (also in those specs)...the 1000w capability is brief. 'Bushelectrics' tells us that heating things need lots of watts...other electro-thingies, not so much ?? (did I say...I'm no technician ?).
AnswerID: 603041

Follow Up By: Annie N - Wednesday, Aug 03, 2016 at 09:30

Wednesday, Aug 03, 2016 at 09:30
Thanks Darian.....will just have to use gas ??
0
FollowupID: 872707

Follow Up By: MEMBER - Darian, SA - Wednesday, Aug 03, 2016 at 11:13

Wednesday, Aug 03, 2016 at 11:13
Yep....a small portable butane stove is probably the easiest solution when off mains power....a number of popular brands all offer basically the same stove, such as this one. Butane burns hotter than LPG, so they are fast cookers.....cheap and very effective....the gas cans in multi-packs are also quite cheap when on special. As with all such appliances, one has to take good note of the safety instructions.
0
FollowupID: 872713

Follow Up By: garrycol - Wednesday, Aug 03, 2016 at 11:25

Wednesday, Aug 03, 2016 at 11:25
But make sure you use them at warmer temps or warm the gas cans at night as they do not work very well at all when temps get below about 5c.

So breakfast might take a while on cold mornings.
0
FollowupID: 872714

Follow Up By: Annie N - Wednesday, Aug 03, 2016 at 11:41

Wednesday, Aug 03, 2016 at 11:41
Hehe thanks Garry! Will take note of cold mornings with the cans, I like breaky when I want it ...don't like waiting too long.
0
FollowupID: 872715

Follow Up By: garrycol - Wednesday, Aug 03, 2016 at 14:00

Wednesday, Aug 03, 2016 at 14:00
They still work just not all that well until the gas cans get some heat in them - snuggle up to them in your sleeping bag.

Some cans are better than others as the butane mix of gases can be different - the blue cans you used to get through Woolworths used to be a bit better in low temps but I dont think they are available any longer.

So just get what is available.
0
FollowupID: 872717

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)