Waterproof 12 volt on off switch

Submitted: Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 20:58
ThreadID: 133121 Views:3074 Replies:6 FollowUps:16
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Hi all. I've just finished installing an in line water pump for the "outside" tap on the camper trailer. Need some help with what sort of on/off switch to use. I can mount the switch under the camper overhang to keep it out of direct rain but it would still be subject to some moisture at times. What is everyone else using? Thanks . Doc
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Reply By: Member - ACD 1 - Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 21:14

Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 21:14
Doc

I use the Narva switch below.

Mine is located on the side of my trailer and is in direct flow of rain. I have never had an issue with it. To be sure I ran a thin bead of sika flex around the edge that contacts the sheet of the trailer.



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Anthony
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Follow Up By: oz doc - Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 21:19

Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 21:19
Ha ha was just discussing that very switch however it needs a 24mm hole to mount it through. So how did you "do" yours? Thanks
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Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 21:34

Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 21:34
I used something called a step drill.

You can get them from Bunnings, Jaycar or Industrial supply Shops. Just make sure the one you get goes to 24 mm.



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Anthony
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Follow Up By: oz doc - Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 21:48

Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 21:48
Wow that's a beast of a tool! Thanks for that. Should do the job nicely. Could have done with that for a few other jobs. Cheers doc.
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Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 22:59

Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 22:59
Doc

Practice before you attack your trailer.

They require a deft hand to use well. Because of the steps you need to apply gentle pressure, but if you use to much, you will punch through to the next step quite easily - especially in soft materials like a trailer.

Cheers

Anthony
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Follow Up By: Gronk - Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 23:42

Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 23:42
Don't know how much a step drill is, but the same can be achieved with a 24mm holesaw !!
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Follow Up By: oz doc - Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 23:48

Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 23:48
Step drill $19 from Bunnings. I have not used a hole saw in metal.do you need a special type of hole saw? Kinda like the step drill idea but might need to practice or mount it on a junction box like swampy said. That way if I have an oops I haven't damaged the camper. Thanks for the ideas.doc
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 05:13

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 05:13
oz doc. With a hole saw you buy one that is suitable for metal.

NEVER use the hole saw to drill the initial pilot hole, use a drill bit that is the same size as the hole saw bit, normally 6mm. Reason for this is if the bit catches or if your hole saw catches it can break the bit and you will end up with a very damaged surface.

Just use a battery drill at a slow speed with the clutch set so it can't grab and all will be good.

Remember to make sure it can't damage anything behind when it breaks through, a piece of timber behind can be used to stop this happening.

I don't know if they still make them, but a chassis punch works well. You only have to drill a pilot hole and then assemble the chassis punch through the hole and start turning the allen key by hand.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 06:53

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 06:53
The step drill bit is a lot better to use than a hole saw and would be the preferred method I would use
There are plenty of switches to choose from with smaller holes that are suitably IP rated available at Jaycar or Whitworths, bought one last week and only cost $6.00
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Follow Up By: D-MaxerWA - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 21:10

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 21:10
Forget the hole saw, you have to buy each size as you need them. I have both, only ever use the step drill, but you are welcome to buy my hole saw setup.

Just buy the step drill that you think will cover all bases, i.e. the largest hole you think you may need. All the other sizes come as well.

If you are only drilling into soft metal, pay the postage and I will send you an old one that is too slow on steel for work.
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Monday, Aug 01, 2016 at 09:52

Monday, Aug 01, 2016 at 09:52
I have many hole saws of different types and I also have step drills.
For smaller holes, particularly in thin materials step drills are definitely the go.

Damn I wish they where around and affordable years ago.

One very big advantage of a step drill is they are great for enlarging existing holes.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Hoyks - Monday, Aug 01, 2016 at 16:58

Monday, Aug 01, 2016 at 16:58
I do sheet metal for a living, so have twist drills, step drill and hole saws.

Twist drills are fine for thin sheet, provided the drill is on the small side. Bigger drills have a habit of grabbing and twisting the thin sheet up the flutes and distorting the material.

Step drills are best for cutting a hole in thin sheet and still maintaining the center you were aiming for. They cut and de-burr without distorting the material. You have to keep the RPM down as they do have a nasty habit of getting hot and burning the cutting surface, particularly in steel. A squirt of WD40 as cutting fluid helps them last a lot longer.

Holesaws are OK for aluminium, but good ones for steel are dear as poision. They can grab and damage the surface when you are starting, so you need to take car there, they also leave a nasty burr that needs to be cleaned up. If whatever you are fitting has a bezzle, then you can often hide any damage a few mm from the hole edge.

As for the switch, I just used plain automotive switches on my motorbike. After 6 years of mud and dust they still worked fine.
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Reply By: swampy - Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 23:36

Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 23:36
hi
Use a on/off toggle that is fully dipped in plastic .[main body]
Once mounted thru panel screw on the toggle boot .
Solder wires with glued heat shrink and the switch is easily splash proof.
In wet enviroments works great .

The other way is mount a toggle on the cover of a junction box . Srew thru the j box to act as a mount . Then have the cables enter via a gland-nut. Screw on toggle boot . Very splash proof setup.

swamp
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 23:40

Saturday, Jul 30, 2016 at 23:40
I use a waterproof momentary switch. Might be the same as the first post above. Fat switch!
AnswerID: 602974

Reply By: Ozhumvee - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 07:15

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 07:15
I always used a weatherproof horn button, Hella and Narva sell them as well as others, stops people turning the switch on and forgetting, also harder for kids to waste water. They last well I think I only had one replacement in 20 years,
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

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Reply By: Member - Boobook - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 09:39

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 09:39
Waterproof toggle switch
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Follow Up By: oz doc - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 10:14

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 10:14
Hi boobook, I clicked on your link but it's taking me to a google maps coordinate. ? Doc
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 10:28

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 10:28
Oops,

try this one.Jaycar switch
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Follow Up By: TomH - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 10:50

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 10:50
Cheapest way to get hole size is bore it out to your largest drill size under 24 mm and get a rats tail file and a packet of bandaids for the blisters LOL
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Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 14:40

Sunday, Jul 31, 2016 at 14:40
Doc

That's why this site is called"ExplorOz"

If you go to those coordinates and look under the fake rock at the front door, you'll find your next clue. Boobook is going into competition with Doug's Sunday History Photograph. LOL

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

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Follow Up By: MartyB - Tuesday, Aug 02, 2016 at 11:44

Tuesday, Aug 02, 2016 at 11:44
I use the same Jaycar switch, It is a 12mm hole. I also add a missile switch cover so it can't be bumped.Missile switch.
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Reply By: Flighty ( WA ) - Tuesday, Aug 02, 2016 at 13:43

Tuesday, Aug 02, 2016 at 13:43
Hi Doc
If pump is a pressure pump, thinking it easier to mount any kind of switch and let the pump do it for you.
Switch can be fitted almost anywhere that's convenient to get at ?
But if not a pressure unit, most toggle switches can be adapted with a simple rubber boot to protect from water and moisture ingress.
My bandsaw is fitted with one and had cutting fluid running over it for a couple of years without damage.
cheers
Flighty

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