So why didn't the Poms follow the Japs in Engineering Techniques?

Submitted: Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 18:02
ThreadID: 133460 Views:4789 Replies:15 FollowUps:36
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Instead of going no where?..I have always loved the machinery made in Great Britian,..Trains, Trucks , motorcyles, cars,tractors, stationary engines ..Whatever!,..everything was reasonably reliable ..always solid construction, but the the whole lot of everything ever made always suffered oil leaks,so was it just bad machining?,..they didn't seem to be able to mate two surfaces together with out having some major tolerance problems, Very strange actually!,...It always made me chuckle with the old joke off the Poms sending a piece of steel turned down to the thickness of a " P hair',to the japs..Exclaiming" Beat that"

The Japs sent it back with a hole drilled through it.!!
Cheers Axle.
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Reply By: Member - mechpete - Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 18:24

Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 18:24
what the poms did wrong was kidding them selves in to thinkin they could make it they should have sent the plans to the japs an got them to build it ,
emagine the RangeRover if the japs had built it
cheers mechpete
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 18:49

Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 18:49
Well in my opinion, the Japs didn't start building anything remotely close to a Range Rover until the 200 series cruiser. It's probably been the worst cruiser as far as reliability goes because it's packed full of tech. The older cruisers were very reliable if you like chugging around in tractors chewing fuel.
Then you have Nissan.....I don't think they can build a high tech diesel engine, and either do they seeing they dropped diesel from the Patrol. Their heyday was the old 4.2, once again, great if you like going slow.
Like I said, my opinion. For what its worth, I've had a 2008 LR Freelander 2 since new and it's coming up to 300k kms and just had regular servicing. I haven't even had to touch the injectors. It's been a lovely car and it doesn't leak oil either. I'm expecting something to go wrong with it soon but it has paid its dues in my book.
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Follow Up By: Drew - Karratha - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 18:10

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 18:10
Michael, my 1988 hj61 Landcruiser sits on 110km/hr no worries, and uses an average of 10.5l/100. It has 506000kms on it. I am happy 'chugging' along in my tractor...
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Reply By: Shaker - Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 18:34

Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 18:34
Who do you think the Japanese learnt from?

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Follow Up By: axle - Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 18:49

Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 18:49
True Shaker, they just did a better job!.....Sadly.


Cheers Axle.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 19:39

Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 19:39
Does that include 3.0 litre Patrols, GU gearboxes, Navara D40 motors?
That's only Nissan, Toyota have had their fair share of issues too!
Although even after that, they have done a better job, they weren't innovators but they could take an idea & improve on it. They learnt to make camera lenses because Zeiss Ikon moved their factory from Germany to Japan (before they entered the war) so that they could make bomb sights for both sides!

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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 11:21

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 11:21
The Japanese mostly learned from Germany and later the US for engineering. The UK has had very little influence in Japan.

The effect is still in place today.

Eastern Japan was more aligned to Germany and selected AEG for the initial power generation. As a result Tokyo and most of eastern Japan is 50Hz.

Osaka and the west went with US based GE and is still 60Hz.
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 12:23

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 12:23
Oh that is simply not true, the Japanese learned a great deal from just about everybody.

The early Nissan patrol petrol motor was based on an Austin motor (C series I think), the early Toyota crown was very much based on the Mercedies, the motor was nearly bolt for bolt, Pergeot had strong influence in the early days of Mazda, Fiat had an oar in there somewhere, though they got more involved in the communist block all the Ladas being old fiat designs.
.
Just about every early Japanees motor vehicle was based on something from existing manufacturers from all over the world.

After the war, everybody wanted a piece of Japan and the Japs did pretty well out of it.


cheers
Their quality control philosophy came from an American. ... talk about a prophet having no respect in his own community.

The Japs got there information and technological help for everywhere.

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Follow Up By: gbc - Monday, Sep 19, 2016 at 10:44

Monday, Sep 19, 2016 at 10:44
Perkins s2 engines powered ford/mazda for a long time too.
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Reply By: Hoyks - Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 18:36

Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 18:36
The other joke is that Landrover Engineers heard that Toyota tested the seals on their vehicles by putting a cat in the car for the weekend.
If the cat suffocated due to no air getting past the seals, then it passed.

So, they got a cat and put it in the new Defender. Come Monday morning, the cat was gone.

But, yes. I think the Brittish held onto the the idea that highly skilled artisans manufacturing bespoke machinery would carry them through, which in the end didn't even work for Rolls Royce.

The unions probably didn't help things. Don't get me wrong, I'm all for organised labour to protect workers rights, but when sticking doggedly to your specific trade, intransigence and demarcation disputes results in you pricing yourself out of the market and out of a job, then maybe you need to rethink your strategy.

The Japanese embraced technology and efficiency which allowed them to produce a quality reliable product for much less than the Europeans could and by the time a lot of them realized they were behind they had no hope of catching up again.
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Follow Up By: axle - Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 18:47

Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 18:47
I think your right mate with the strategy scenario, The Japanese certainly embraced technology and ran with it in the early days to their benefit, right up till present times.


Cheers Axle.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 19:42

Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 19:42
Gee Hoyks, I think you just described what happened to the Australian car manufacturing industry.

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Reply By: Erad - Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 20:04

Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 20:04
There is this old myth that old Landrovers leaked oil. Totally worng. They didn't - they were merely marking their territory....
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Follow Up By: axle - Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 20:15

Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 20:15
Trouble is mate people with new driveways, do get the chits with territory marking from landrovers!!!....lol ..iknow after 16yrs of defender ownership.

Cheers Axle.
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Reply By: Bob R4 - Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 21:18

Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 21:18
I recall reading many years ago that when the Americans entered WW2, an agreement was made that the yanks would start building Merlin engines for Mustangs, and other aircraft, in large numbers, much to the horror of Rolls Royce.
However, RR offered to send over some engineers to get the ball rolling, only to be told they wouldn't be needed as Packard were re-drawing the engine, virtually redesigning it, and this would take a few months.
When asked why such a fine engine needed a re-design, RR were told the design was impossible to build as a mass produced item as its tolerances were too close.
It seemed every British built Merlin was hand build by literally going through a large selection of parts, and perfectly hand matching them, to end up with an engine with fine tolerances and excellent performance.
When RR found out the new design tolerances were plus or minus a "few thou" they were aghast, but the yanks literally shoved thousands of engines together on assembly lines without the need for "RR" standard engineers.
They worked OK and sure got a lot of aircraft into the war effort.

I thought it was interesting.

Bob
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Follow Up By: axle - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 07:58

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 07:58
That is interesting Bob ,something most wouldn't realise.


Cheers Axle.
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Follow Up By: Member - Mark (Tamworth NSW) - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 14:54

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 14:54
Bob I believe it was Spitfires (not Mustangs) that the Packard motor company made engines for. I was told this by a Packard enthusiast who also said that Packard was the American equivalent of Rolls Royce pre WWII.
Mark
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 15:19

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 15:19
I think you will find that both Spitfires and Huricanes had rolls royce motors ....... it might be the American Thunderbolt that ya thinking off ...... there where British and other squadrons flying those.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Hoyks - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 15:39

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 15:39
There were RR Merlins and Packard Merlin.
Same design, but built in the US and assembled so that all the parts were interchangeable with UK Merlins.
I also didn't know that a bunch of the RR Merlins were built by Ford in the UK.
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Follow Up By: Genny - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 19:39

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 19:39
Packard Merlins
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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 23:53

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 23:53
The Erks (maintenance mechanics) loved the aircraft fitted with Packard Merlins as they came with a superb toolkit - much better than the one from RR.
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Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Monday, Sep 19, 2016 at 09:20

Monday, Sep 19, 2016 at 09:20
Perhaps the ones made by RR did not require a superb toolkit. :)
Dave.
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Reply By: eaglefree - Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 23:11

Saturday, Sep 17, 2016 at 23:11
It was interesting bobr

In the 60s and 70s my father gave the English cars chance after chance.

Austin Farina, Cambridge then his teenage son recommended the Marina. My fault!!

Finally he bought a new Toyota Corolla in 1978. That car did what it was designed to do, run and keep running.

In 1985 he sold it as it had a noisy clutch bearing....he always regretted that decision.

Apart from a Morris Nomad I went Mazda's 808 and Datsun 2000 sports. Great engines.

But I made one big bad decision...I got involved with Lotus cars. Now there's an example of high maintenance, pull your hair out type engine
Oh, and my brother had a mini. But after spending a full day replacing the lower radiator hisr I passed on them...
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Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 13:34

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 13:34
I just drove passed about 20 or 30 Loti heading north from Romsey in Victoria. Some very fine examples.
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Reply By: Sigmund - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 08:10

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 08:10
The Brits certainly innovated in automotive design (like air suspension, E-W engine layout, frame oil tanks on motorbikes) but the Japs committed to continuous quality improvement and their build quality and reliability outstripped the Brits. Plus management nous in the Western car industry wasn't razor sharp - witness sticking with big displacement motors in big sedans for years after petrol prices started their upward climb and after the structure of the family changed forever.
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 09:31

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 09:31
Have covered a lot of Australia this year and am amazed at the number of late model Discoverys pulling caravans and campers. Expected to see the odd one broken down, but instead saw a lot of happy owners. Maybe the tide is turning?
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 10:25

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 10:25
The tide started turning around 2006 when Ford took over Land Rover. This resulted in parts being used that are common to a lot of different brands. The motor in my Freelander 2 is the same as at least 5 other brands/models that I know of and the gearbox is used in a few Mazdas. There's a fair case to make that Land Rover really isn't English any more, it's just assembled in England similar to how Hilux's are assembled in Thailand.....I think? They did a good job assembling my car, after 8 years and near on 300k over every corrugated track I've had the time to travel on, there are no rattles yet.
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Reply By: harryopal - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 09:36

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 09:36
It is interesting to note that some responses us the term "Japs" and other "Japanese". It is not a matter of political correcteness but use of "Japanese" is a reflection of the fact that we live in a shrunken world. Our neighbours, friends and work colleagues are bound to include people born elsewhere. With old standard terms like "Japs", "Poms" and "Wogs" it is easy to fall back on, "No offence intended."

As an Australian I hate to be referred to as English let alone "Pom."
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Follow Up By: Member - Bigfish - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 14:38

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 14:38
You should never call an englishman a Pom....he is a soapdodger...
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Reply By: Tony H15 - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 10:34

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 10:34
And now the Koreans are showing the Japanese how to do it right. Time moves on!
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Follow Up By: Hoyks - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 12:42

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 12:42
I think it is that the Koreans are doing it cheaper.
The Yen in relation to international currencies and the cost of Japanese labour is hurting them, especially in a time when the cost of $1000/car can be the difference in manufacturing it in one country or moving into a factory elsewhere.

The quality and longevity of the Korean product is up there though, even if it is far from what we would consider top shelf. I can remember 25 years ago when Excels arrived and we all looked at them as disposable cars. There are plenty of them still getting around.
Same for Ford Fiestiva, which was a re-badged Kia. A mate at work had one of those, 22 years old and serviced when he felt guilty about it, but you couldn't kill it with a stick. Certainly not an inspiring ride, but if you are after something that gets you too and from work and all you have to do is add fuel and change the oil every 18 months (certainly not a recommended maintenance scheduled), then you will certainly get your moneys worth.
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Follow Up By: Tony H15 - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 17:16

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 17:16
I've owned two Korean cars, both were leaps and bounds in front of my previous Japanese cars, and dare I say it my current Japanese vehicle also, in terms of both technology and quality of finish. And then there is confidence in your product: all the Koreans offer five year warranties, Kia now offer a seven year warranty.

On the Japanese automotive industry, Japan's Zaibatsu conglomerate began building trucks around 1910, the demand for passenger type vehicles was very small so few were built. Demand for domestic products was greatly increased by the Japanese military buildup before World War II, causing many Japanese manufacturers to break out of their shells and design their own vehicles, aircraft, tanks, weapons and so on. After the war there was an obvious slump, but before and immediately after the war Japanese industry was largely self serving, exporting was a thing of the future.

Marusho/Lilac motorcycles were an excellent example. Marusho/Lilac made several models from V twins to horizontaly opposed twins to single cylinders between 1948 and 1967 and had good success on the the racetrack against the likes of Honda and other Japanese manufacturers. Unfortunately, only a handful were exported and even fewer now survive outside of Japan.

Sadly our western products lagged behind in both technology and quality and of course their dogged persistance in building to a market that was shrinking didn't help, witness: Falcon and Commodore.

Watch out for the Chinese, with demand will come quality as it did with Japanese and Korean products.Doubt it? look at your whitegoods, electronic goods and so on, just about all Chinese now!
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Reply By: The Bantam - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 13:47

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 13:47
Probably the original reason the British automotive and engineering industry did not go down the same road as the Japanese is ....... the British had existing factories, existing methods and skill base.
The Japanese where pretty much starting from scratch.

The British manufacturers where struggling to get back on their feet and back to their primary business after being at war, for 10 years and under the building treat of war for 10 years prior to that.
Much of their machinery was old and materials where still in short supply.

The Japs on the other hand where starting again and doing something new.

The Brit's had spent 20 years building planes with facilities intended to build cars, the Jap's where now building cars in facilities intended to build planes.

The other very big factor is that the British Automotive industry ( and industry in general) was primarily focused on the domestic market with some export to empire countries.

The Japanese Automotive industry was totally focused on building for export.

The Jap's knew that if their vehicles ( and other products) where to sell against long established local brands amid an atmosphere of winning national pride and post war hatred ..... their product had to be better and cheaper than it's competitors.

By the late 60's and early 70's the Japanese where building cars that WHERE better made and better optioned than the British and American designed vehicles they where competing with.
In the 60's, many British vehicles inspite of comming from a cold climate, the heater was an option, well into the 70's most British and American designed vehicles a radio was an option. The Japanese they where integrated, came standard and they worked well.

The British and American automotive industries have never caught up and that is why both are near total collapse.

Some of the British and American designed vehicles are still new metalwork on base design that has been around for 40 or 50 years ... in that time the Jap's and their other Asian Cousins have braught out one after the other, from the ground up new designs.

The Brit's and the Yanks, have not followed the Jap's, because they simply don't know how and they won't admit that.

The Japanese culture, understands the value of shame and defeat ..... they know it is a time to take a long hard look at themselves and find a different and /or a better way.

The Yanks won't admit defeat and the Brits will just insist on doing what they always have.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 15:16

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 15:16
I only agree with that up until the late 90's at which time I think the Japanese sat back, relaxed and dropped the ball. They were reluctant to compete in terms of standard accessories like cruise, traction control, abs, fuel economy and engine power preferring to keep doing what they had been doing and charging a motza if you wanted the extras. I haven't bought a Japanese car since 1999 because I view them as old fashioned, poorly styled, lacking in standard features, ordinary ride and over priced. The reliability factor hasn't been an issue for me so I haven't regretted it in the slightest. My last purchase, a run around for my business, was a Kia Cerato, 7 years unlimited kms warranty, fixed price 15k/12 mths service interval with cruise, comfy seats and bluetooth. I wish they made a decent 4wd with low range.
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 17:07

Sunday, Sep 18, 2016 at 17:07
The second string brands especially Ford, GM, and Chrisler ( all now second string brands) are now trying to compete with the Japanese with included accessories and styling ........ but they continue with the ways of old, function not the main priority, poorly engineered, comparativly unreliable, hidden costs for the owner and nothing of substance that is new or special. ... yes and the Americans simply don't understand service.

I don't want a Ford or GM sat nav even if it's free ....... OH we include fog lamps ...... which 90% of Australians don't need ..... serioulsy who needs a voice activated HIFI ....... these included accessories are mostly a lot of BS and poor examples of what is available.

The Japanese simply don't have to compete when their vehicles continue sell top of catagory year after year.

The koreans, the Indians and the Chinese continue to make their way in the market, but not realy at the cost of the Japanese.

We have the Europeans giving it another go in Australia ...... it was the Japs getting on their game, that ran em out of town when they gave it a big push back in the 60's and 70's ..... the Europeans will always be at a disadvantage in Australia because they are a long way from home. Their freight costs must be huge.
Yeh and like a lot of european product ..... bat$#!^ weird ...... no I don't want the indicator on the left hand of the steering wheel and ...... a speedo in the middle of the car .. are you kidding.

Where the Japanese have lost market is where they have not stuck to their guns and stayed with the primary design and function of the model and tried to build a car that is not typically Japanese.... Toyota for example have ruined the RAV and the Corrola and are loosing sales because of it.

Mazda have stuck to their guns with their 323 ( sorry 3) and it now has more of the traditional Corrola market.

Another very big advantage in Australia, is the Japanese drive on the same side of the road as we do ........ so there is no left hand drive converted BS ...... everything is designed primarily for right hand drive.

Yeh the Jap cars are here to stay, they have such a conspicuous brace of advantages.

cheers
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Reply By: cruza25 - Monday, Sep 19, 2016 at 14:43

Monday, Sep 19, 2016 at 14:43
The car industry in the U.K. Is booming with almost 2 million units rolling off the lines valued at almost 60 billion pounds
Almost more than ever during the heyday of the 60s and 70s

Honda Nissan Toyota jag Land Rover mini and BMW all have very modern plant there now

Most f1 and wrc cars are built there as well

Not quite the picture everyone thinks


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Reply By: Alloy c/t - Tuesday, Sep 20, 2016 at 10:02

Tuesday, Sep 20, 2016 at 10:02
Today vehicle manufacturing is a Global market ,there is simply no such thing as a purely 'British' or Japanese or American -Chinese -Korean or South American
….. Mazda Japanese ? Some engines are from Spain ! Even the 'All American' Harley Davidson is a bits this and bits a that sourced from all over the world [German electrics , Australian wheels etc.]
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Reply By: Zippo - Wednesday, Sep 21, 2016 at 16:32

Wednesday, Sep 21, 2016 at 16:32
In a word? Arrogance.
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Reply By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Thursday, Sep 22, 2016 at 18:26

Thursday, Sep 22, 2016 at 18:26
There are two words which make the automotive world eternally grateful the Japanese didn't follow the British model ....... and where the Poms should have followed the Japs ....

"Lucas Electrics" .....
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Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Thursday, Sep 22, 2016 at 19:48

Thursday, Sep 22, 2016 at 19:48
LOL Scott

Having ridden and raced Norton, Triumph and BSA motorcycles for many years when I was younger I couldn't agree more !!

Cheers

Gazz

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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Thursday, Sep 22, 2016 at 20:19

Thursday, Sep 22, 2016 at 20:19
The famed "Prince of Darkness" :-)

The Lucas motto: "Get home before dark."

Lucas denies having invented darkness. But they still claim "sudden, unexpected darkness"

Lucas--inventor of the first intermittent wiper.

Lucas--inventor of the self-dimming headlamp.

The three-position Lucas switch--DIM, FLICKER and OFF.

The other three switch settings--SMOKE, SMOLDER and IGNITE.

Lucas dip-switch positions: LOW and BLOW (Bruce Miller, www.hermit.cc)

The original anti-theft devices--Lucas Electric products.
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Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Thursday, Sep 22, 2016 at 20:35

Thursday, Sep 22, 2016 at 20:35
Hey Michael


"'The other three switch settings--SMOKE, SMOLDER and IGNITE.

Lucas dip-switch positions: LOW and BLOW (Bruce Miller, www.hermit.cc)

The original anti-theft devices--Lucas Electric products."


Pretty sure that's why none of my bikes got stolen ha ha ha !!


Cheers

Gazz
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Friday, Sep 23, 2016 at 12:06

Friday, Sep 23, 2016 at 12:06
Ahh yes ,lovely Lucas ,can remember when the lucas coils gave up the ghost on my 71 750 Norton Commando Roadster when only 4mths old , was advised to fit a pair of 6v coils from early model VW beetles [ Bosche coils] , worked a dream , the Germans gave the British a bit of spark...
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Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Friday, Sep 23, 2016 at 13:18

Friday, Sep 23, 2016 at 13:18
G'day Alloy

Loved my Commandos !!

The two best British bikes I owned were a MK2A 850 Norton Commando and a 1975 Triumph Trident T160

Cheers

Gazz

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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Friday, Sep 23, 2016 at 15:45

Friday, Sep 23, 2016 at 15:45
Dad used to have an 850 Commando triple. Two things I remember from it...

1. the starter motor was hit & miss, mostly miss ... if you kicked it over you had to get it at TDC and give it everything you had - any hint of trepidation and you got shot over the handlebars...

2. when it was warming up, it used to do slow 360's on the centre stand
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Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Saturday, Sep 24, 2016 at 09:37

Saturday, Sep 24, 2016 at 09:37
G'day Scott

Commandos were two cylinders not triples like the Trident. And yes having quite a few of them both for road and race use they were a very interesting bike to kick start - but if they were tuned properly and you worked out "the knack" they started nearly first kick every time. Having a very short kick start lever didn't help.

There used to be a saying about "Amal" carbies on the old British bikes -

" There's only one thing worse than having an Amal carby on your bike - and that's having two of them " lol

Certainly wish I could have afforded to have kept one or two of them !


All the best

Gazz
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Saturday, Sep 24, 2016 at 10:50

Saturday, Sep 24, 2016 at 10:50
My Brit bike story.

1. BSA 'Gold Star' 1971 (actually a stroked Victor in a street scrambler costume). It took 3 punctures to realise that not all the spokes had been ground flush in the rim after setting up the wheel at the factory. A woodruff key, not a spline, was used to fit the kick starter. On a 500cc single! Of course kickback would trash it. Then the sidecover would have to come off, the broken key chipped out, a new gasket sourced and the thing reassembled. Only, casting forces would warp the sidecover so a heap of Gasket Goo (remember that?) was needed to fill the gaps. The Amal (anal!) carb float valve would stick and fill the crankcase with juice, or with the bowl etc full if you remembered the petcock. And so on. But it handled well.

2. Triumph Sprint 955 in the noughties. They would've learned, I thought. Not really. Clutch cable snapped on the first country ride and more crap happened that I won't bore you with. Cheap materials and components. Pearl of a motor though. And it hasn't stopped Triumph going gangbusters in sales.
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Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Saturday, Sep 24, 2016 at 12:24

Saturday, Sep 24, 2016 at 12:24
G'day Sigmund

Yep - you could sure fill a few books on British bike stories.

But I still loved every one I had and once sorted I got nearly 40,000 trouble free miles out of one of my Nortons.


Cheers

Gazz
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Saturday, Sep 24, 2016 at 14:56

Saturday, Sep 24, 2016 at 14:56
Yeah, they had character lol.
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 09:30

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 09:30
If I remember rightly the Norton 750 Commando Roadster [ not the straight Commando which we called a fastback due to the fibreglass behind the seat above the mudguard ] cost all of $1560.00 registered and insured brand spanking new in 71 from of all places the Honda dealer in Albury NSW [ Stan Steen Honda ].
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Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 09:47

Sunday, Sep 25, 2016 at 09:47
G'day Alloy

Yep you're right - they were called a Fastback !

Geez you'd snap up half a dozen of them now at that price !!

I remember drooling over the new 850 Commandos and 750 Tridents at Taylors International in Pirie Street Adelaide around 73/74 when the Norton was $2150 and the Trident was $2300 - if only I earned more than $10 a week I probably could have afforded one.

Cheers

Gazz

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