Puncture repair Kit

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 10:10
ThreadID: 13355 Views:7712 Replies:9 FollowUps:7
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Just after a reccomendation as to the best puncture repair kit available... some have the tarry rope stuff alone and others have the usuall stuff plus some glue/lube stuff. Any on know which is better?
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Reply By: Member - Bruce and Anne - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 10:31

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 10:31
Hi Rick, last year on our way back from Darwin we got a flat tyre not far from the Roper River on one of our Wrangler AT/R's and fixed it with our $13 repair kit I brought at Super Cheap Auto's. I did not get it fixed untill we got home, did about 3000 k. So I believe you do not have to spend a lot of money on these kits.
Cheers Bruce.
Cheers Bruce
D.Max and Jayco Outback

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AnswerID: 61143

Reply By: Jimbo (WA) - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 10:40

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 10:40
Rick, I think whatever kit you go for, you'll need the tubeless hole repair ropes (tarry rope stuff) and the insert tool, as well as the standard patches for both inside of tyre carcasses and tubes if fitted.

Try looking for info on "Tyreplier Puncture Repair Kit" and / or "Safety Seal Tyre Repair Kit" to get you started.

Tyrepliers are here

and Safety Seal have are here 1300 555 454
AnswerID: 61145

Reply By: Rosscoe - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 10:49

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 10:49
Rick,
I have a kit I bought from ARB about three years ago. Repaired three tyres last time I was away. Two on the Gibb River Road and one in Alice Springs (nail). They were highway tyres and I never did get them repaired professionally. Swapped to BF Goodrich not long after I came home.

The last two pubctures I repaired on the car without taking the wheels off. A little bit of soapy water with my compressor connected and no problems.

Can't help with comparison but I don't think cost comes into it when you're in the middle of nowhere in 45 Degree heat, with the dust and flies.

Still a firm believer in that "you get what you pay for".

Which ever you choose my recommendation is "don't leave home witout one"

PS also thoroughly recommed those 12V DC impact wrenches. Make changeing wheels real easy.
AnswerID: 61146

Follow Up By: 90s_owner - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 17:58

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 17:58
Rosscoe,
Glad to hear you like those 12v impact wrenches. I was looking at getting one of them. Saw one advertised for around $90, does that get a good one, do you know?
Glenn B.
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FollowupID: 322776

Follow Up By: Rosscoe - Wednesday, Jun 02, 2004 at 08:48

Wednesday, Jun 02, 2004 at 08:48
Hi Glenn,

I paid only $60.00, which was a mechanic friend's wholesale buy price. I think I've seen them for btetween $80 to $90.
They come in a green plastic box with a number of different size sockets.
They are not "workshop" heavy duty quality but for the relative few times the average motorist needs to use them they are more than adequate.
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FollowupID: 322816

Follow Up By: 90s_owner - Thursday, Jun 03, 2004 at 21:41

Thursday, Jun 03, 2004 at 21:41
Rosscoe,
Thanks, being basically lazy, I'll give one a go.
Glenn B
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FollowupID: 323059

Reply By: Member - Rohan K - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 11:14

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 11:14
Rick, just a word of caution. I recommend you choose a kit/set that has steel handled rasp and insertion tools. The plastic handled ones have been known to break. The resultant injury - a steel shaft piercing the hand - isn't really what you want in the middle of no-where, with a tyre still to repair.

The slightly higher purchase price is cheap insurance.

AnswerID: 61150

Follow Up By: Michael - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 11:50

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 11:50
I'm with you Rohan, I purchased my Safety Seal kit about 4 years ago, used it five times, at about $20 dollars a repair, its now paid for itself. Let alone the convenience at the time.. Money well spent on a quality kit.. Michael
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FollowupID: 322729

Reply By: srowlandson - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 11:32

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 11:32
I have the complete Tyrepliers kit, although just their Punture Repair kit is excellent value.

Very easy to obtain extra top up items for a reasonable price too, with the carded refill packs.

Steve
AnswerID: 61154

Reply By: Member - Pesty (SA) - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 11:46

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 11:46
If you are going to be spending much time in the bush you need a complete tyre repair kit.
I bought the R&R Beadbreaker kit because it is easier than tyre pliers to operate as we get older, as its one of those items you only buy once.
It has everything and allows you to fit internal patches or change a tyre etc. if need be.
I use it for work repaiirng all my own flats on my work vehicles and trailers and I have more than half paid for it in 12 months.
AnswerID: 61160

Follow Up By: srowlandson - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 13:08

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 13:08
I have never understood this arguement,

personally, i find wrestlnig the tyre from the rim with the 2 tyre levers the hard part,

breaking a bead with tyrepliers is easy :|

Steve
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FollowupID: 322739

Follow Up By: Member - Pesty (SA) - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 13:17

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 13:17
I liked the tyrepliers too but SWMBO watched the demo's and said would I be able to use them when I was 65, 70, 75 years old, so I saw her point.
You still need tyre levers no matter what you break the bead with, and the R&R may be a little slower but you get used to using it, and it doesnt require as much effort.
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FollowupID: 322743

Reply By: Crackles - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 18:03

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 18:03
'Camel' make a good allround repair kit available at Repco. (patches, glue, tubeless repair, valves etc) I just added a couple of sidewall patches from the local tyre joint. Cheers, Craig..............................
AnswerID: 61223

Follow Up By: Nino & Kerry (VIC) - Wednesday, Jun 02, 2004 at 15:56

Wednesday, Jun 02, 2004 at 15:56
I bought the 'Camel' kit as well and can highly recommend it, but like Craig added to it. You don't get much glue or solvent in the kit and no side wall patches. But great kit other wise
cheers Nino
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FollowupID: 322832

Reply By: vuduguru - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 21:46

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 21:46
Guys,
Tyreweld will save your butt 90% of the time. $20 a can no removal, use the left overs on the kid bikes. Very good value
Shane
AnswerID: 61267

Reply By: Bitsumishin - Mike A (WA) - Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 23:58

Tuesday, Jun 01, 2004 at 23:58
I bought the full Tyrepliers kit AFTER getting 7 flats along Gibb River Rd but I've never used it (except once to test in the comfort of my own home). I swear by the glue & rope kits that I became very proficient at. The Tyrepliers run out to about $295- but you can have mine for around $195- if your interested.
AnswerID: 61294

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