Engel power pack help!

Submitted: Wednesday, Oct 05, 2016 at 10:40
ThreadID: 133559 Views:4530 Replies:12 FollowUps:6
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Hey guys,

I was silly and plugged the 240 into my engel not realizing it was a bit damp resulting in smoke and a bad smell argghh! It still works on 240 but has lost 12 volt. I pulled the power supply apart and found the component that seems to have worn the impact. Only thing is, the coponent number is burnt away!

Can anyone tell me what this component is? And a part number would be great if possible! I have circled the mystery bit in red.

Cheers!
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Reply By: HKB Electronics - Wednesday, Oct 05, 2016 at 11:47

Wednesday, Oct 05, 2016 at 11:47
That type of package could be one of several types of devices, honestly if you don't know what your doing you'd be better off taking it to someone else for repair. Most likely there will be other components that are damaged and replacing just the one circled could end up causing more damage.

Unfortunately in this day and age it will most likely cost you more to have it repaired than to buy a new one.
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Oct 05, 2016 at 12:28

Wednesday, Oct 05, 2016 at 12:28
Agree 100%.

Phil
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Oct 05, 2016 at 17:45

Wednesday, Oct 05, 2016 at 17:45
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Hi Justin,

That component is almost certainly a diode, but not just any diode.... it is probably rated at 600 volt and maybe 5 amp. However, I wouldn't fool with it unless you were electronically skilled and familiar with the particular Engel product. As has been said, simply replacing it could cause even more damage.
Take the whole fridge to an Engel repair agent.

Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Member - Tony H (touring oz) - Wednesday, Oct 05, 2016 at 23:22

Wednesday, Oct 05, 2016 at 23:22
Sorry.... but it if you have lost the smoke .... that's what makes it work....your buggered!


My poor attempt at humor.....at your expense
Take your fridge to a suitably qualified repairer :-)
Insanity doesnt run in my family.... it gallops!

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Reply By: Member - Peter W (WA) - Thursday, Oct 06, 2016 at 00:23

Thursday, Oct 06, 2016 at 00:23
Mine was the opposite, big smoke and would run on 12v but not 240. Replaced the power supply for about $325. Plug & play and all's good.
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Oct 06, 2016 at 07:48

Thursday, Oct 06, 2016 at 07:48
Hi Justin

Engel do not supply individual components , but instead you have to replace the power supply.


Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: dad1340 - Thursday, Oct 06, 2016 at 09:17

Thursday, Oct 06, 2016 at 09:17
An expensive mistake Justine as you would have found out by now.

My 39L Engel is still going strong in my last 4WD. It was purchased in 1986.

Maintenance was; run it regularly and occasionally blow out any collected lint, dust etc. That's it.
Any moisture build up or water contact is to be avoided around most electrics

Cheers

dad
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Reply By: The Bantam - Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 11:47

Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 11:47
Lets assume you have the ability to desolder and resolder the part sucessfully.
Remember this is not a fibreglass board and it won't be real robust.
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Look at the PCB directly under the part ..if it is not burnt.
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Do you know what diode symbol, is?
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Chances are it's a 3 amp diode .... if it is a 1N5408 is possibly a reasonable choice 3 amps 1000V ....... under 50c from the usual suspects.
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then it might be a transorb ... then a diode is no help.
.

If it is a diode and you can replace it ...... it's possibly worth a punt ..... otherwise you are up for a new board.
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If it was mine I would trace the circuit ... does not look too complex.
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another thing is ..... get the part out and get it under good light ..... with maybe a smear of spittle ........ the shadow of the markings may be vissible

best of luck chum
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 11:51

Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 11:51
Where are you Justin
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Reply By: Sigmund - Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 11:58

Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 11:58
FWIW I never thought storing the fridge required anything more than keeping the lid ajar. However EvaKool recommend their Aus made fridges be left running.
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Reply By: justin w6 - Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 13:49

Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 13:49
Cheers for the replies,

Turns out it was VRD. The circuit should work without it. Which means something has burnt out. The fact the whole circuit probably endured 240 volts makes me think that there could be any number of components fried.

I found out the reason 240 works is that the 140 circuit is quiet simple. 240ac reduced to 22 volts Ac through a transformer then to the compressor via the thermostat. Unfortunately the 12 volt is more complex.

The old fridge runs at 3.5 amps @ 12 volt

Or 48 watts at 240 volt (2.2 amps) so OHMS law tells me it will draw 4 amps at 240 volt. So I think the best bet is to buy a cheap inverter which will hopefully see the fridge out then I will buy a shiny new engel to last another 30 years lol! I searched high and low to try find a 12vdc -22vac inverter as that could have been wired in easily. You can get variable voltage inverters on ebay for under $10 but getting it to AC @ 50htz is the issue.

Silly expensive mistake on my part. The engel only cost me $120 so not a big deal. Thanks guys!
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 14:30

Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 14:30
.

Justin, I'm afraid that you are somewhat confused, maybe someone is confusing you?

The component in question is certainly not what is commonly described as a "VRD" (Voltage Reduction Device). Such devices are much more complex than the simple 2-lead component circled in the photo. It is clearly a simple diode or a zener diode and from its location relative to the 12Vdc input pins I would expect it to be across the input in reverse bias in order to protect the circuit board from the destruction of having the 12V presented to the fridge with reverse polarity. This is a common protection method which shunts the reverse dc and causes the external protection fuse to blow thus preventing reverse polarity to the board. Of course, if there is not a suitably rated protection fuse (10 to 20A) in the supply then a heavy current will flow and destroy the diode and consequently the circuit board.
It is probable that this is what has happened to your fridge. The fact that it still works on 240Vac calls into question that any damage was caused by dampness and the application of 240V.

Your power calculations and conclusions are all wrong. The fridge will draw about 50W on AC or DC so if you wish to run it from a 12Vdc-to-240Vac inverter then one rated at 200W or more should handle it. It also would need to be a "Pure Sinewave" inverter to do the job. A "Modified Sine Wave" inverter MAY work but then again it may not. Certainly a "Square Wave" one will not work. However, be aware that due to efficiency losses of about 20-25% in the inverter you will be using more 12V power than with the original configuration. Incidentally, I have no idea of what you are referring to as "variable voltage inverters on ebay for under $10". Anything fitting that description and price has no application here.

All in all, if the fridge only cost you $120 then I would not spend further on it. Keep it as a 240Vac fridge for the Christmas drinks and invest in a new fridge for the vehicle.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: justin w6 - Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 17:36

Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 17:36
http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Semitec/Z6047/?qs=wgO0AD0o1vsOmMgnD9o9%252bQ%3D%3D

The part was z6047, a Transient Voltage Suppressor. Not a VRD, you are correct. The 240 volt circuit is literally 240vAC through a transformer down to 20vAC to the compressor with very little electronics.

I meant to write, at 240 volts at 48 watts is 0.2 amps. Applying OHMS law this equates to 4 amps at 12 volts. An inverter SHOULD be 85% + efficient if running at near capacity (I guess it depends on quality and PSW vs MSW)

You can get variable voltage inverters online (I was thinking perhaps i could get one that inverted 12vDC to 20vAC for the compressor as the if 20vAC was supplied then the inverter circuit (the one not working) could be bypassed.

For me this wasn't really about fixing a fridge. But more about learning (Which I did).
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 18:27

Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 18:27
.
I think that I have learned something too!

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Saturday, Oct 08, 2016 at 11:26

Saturday, Oct 08, 2016 at 11:26
told ya it might be a transorb ( brand name for a transient voltage surpressor)

Cut it out and see if the circuit runs ...... they do sometimes fail short circuit.

If you have a value for it you can replace it

cheers
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 15:03

Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 15:03
Further to my reply above, are you sure that is a genuine Engel fridge? I do not recognise the circuit board as "Engel". Maybe a very early model?
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: justin w6 - Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 16:20

Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 16:20
It is a genuine grey top 2 litre engel. Circuit matches circuit diagram (i ended up getting).
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Reply By: Dean K3 - Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 23:23

Friday, Oct 07, 2016 at 23:23
Had me searching hi n low for red circled bit - talk about testing my eyes.

Strongly looks like a diode, and if that is the fact any good older knowledgeable tv tech or radio tech should be able to identify and replace - just don't rock up to the local elctronics compoentn supp;y comapny and expect them to know what it is as most are younger than me and have evn less idea what components are then me

I just have 8 years of radio experience and look at circuits now n again -not qualified i might add

I suspect maybe other componets that have been fried though and at times cost of repairing vs new circuit board or control unit is comparable
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