What are these?

Submitted: Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 01:21
ThreadID: 133743 Views:3593 Replies:6 FollowUps:6
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Found on a rocky hill /outcrop in the Mt Magnet area.
Very common on this spot.
They are about what you expect a "light rock" to weigh. In other words heavier than dried clay.
The holes internally are quite symetrical and smooth bore.
Very curious.
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Reply By: Member - Odog - Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 06:25

Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 06:25
Look to me like the ancient wasp nest things, very common in the dunes around Fowlers Bay on the coast in South Oz.. place was littered with them... especially when you drive to the Mexican Hat area.. hope that answers your question, not saying it is that, but looks like it to me.. cheers Odog
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Reply By: Ron A - Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 09:53

Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 09:53
Fantastic find bungarra.
It appears you have found some very old gold moulds. They were used in the 1800's by Miners in more remote areas to enable easier storage and transport of their gold. For their age they are in excellent condition.
The larger one looks like a one ounce mould and the smaller possibly a half ounce mould.
To manufacture the Miners would find a stick of appropriate size and mould a sand/clay mixture over the stick. This was a very fine process and many Miners engaged a Chinese Miner named Suk Wun Inn to supply them to ensure a consistent size.
Whilst they were not used in the Victorian Gold Fields Sovereign Hill in Ballarat does have quite a few on display.
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Follow Up By: Life Member - Duncan W (WA) - Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 10:57

Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 10:57
Pity it's not Friday as you almost had me believing your story until you mentioned the Chinese name "Suck one in"

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Dunc
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Follow Up By: Phil B (WA) - Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 11:19

Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 11:19
Hey Ron


I'm a bit of a bullshitter myself but this answer beats many of my stunts - well done



Truthful Phil


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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 23:22

Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 23:22
Sum Ting Wong was another reasonably famous Chinese miner...
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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 23:37

Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 23:37
Arrh yes - and then of course there was the little known Chinese prospector, Him Hung Long who gave up the life of gold fossicking to become a male escort in downtown Kalgoorlie in the early 1900's.

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Greg.
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Follow Up By: KiwiAngler - Friday, Nov 11, 2016 at 18:07

Friday, Nov 11, 2016 at 18:07
But after receiving complaints from many of his escorts he had to change his name to Wun Hung Low
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Reply By: Batt's - Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 12:15

Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 12:15
Worth hanging onto and getting them checked out by an outback museum or something similar may be an interesting story behind them.
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Follow Up By: Member - bungarra (WA) - Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 12:25

Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 12:25
Some have been sent to Meuseum thanks. will be interesting
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Reply By: Member - MIKE.G - Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 20:24

Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 20:24
Hi Bungarra,

Have a look on Google for "weevil cocoons". They are fossils found in abundance on the west coast of SA. These could be the same thing but as they are further west may contain some iron content and badly worn.

Good luck.

Cheers,

Mike
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Reply By: Member - bungarra (WA) - Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 22:01

Thursday, Nov 10, 2016 at 22:01
Thanks Mike
Definitely no iron content. The hole is quite smooth internally. I thought of some sort of fossilised wasp nest except heavier than clay and definitely a light rock.
Found whilst prospecting and I am very familiar with specimens with iron content etc.
Museum may have the definitive answer perhaps
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Reply By: Member - MARIC - Saturday, Nov 12, 2016 at 10:57

Saturday, Nov 12, 2016 at 10:57
After the tears in my eyes finished rolling down my cheeks, my spouse thinks they are a type of fossil insect nest.
We lived in Cue for 3 years in the 70's and have found nearly similar but looking more like a dutch clog, think they were a wasps cocoon.
Hope that was of some help
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