Wrecked vehicles/trailers left in the outback

Submitted: Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 at 19:56
ThreadID: 133812 Views:7887 Replies:17 FollowUps:46
This Thread has been Archived
We have all seen numerous examples of abandoned damaged vehicles & trailers in out of the way places. (C.S.R., Gunbarrel, etc) that are a blight on the otherwise pristine landscape.(Don't anybody mention the fuel drums from Capricorn on the C.S.R.).I am acutely aware of the costs to recover these pieces of equipment but in a lot of cases the equipment would most likely have been insured hence I figured that when the insurance company "wrote off" the damaged item, said item became the property of the insurance company & therefore should be legally responsible to remove the residue.
Apparently not so according to one insurance company I spoke to today regarding insurance on our TVan."Out there, once it's written off it's out of our operation" was the reply to my question.
I was not impressed with their attitude but maybe it's a common thing.
Has anybody had any experience with their equipment being damaged, written off & left where it lay & what are your thoughts on this insurance company attitude ?
Every day vertical above ground is a bonus.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

Back Expand Un-Read 1 Moderator

Reply By: GREG T11 - Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 at 20:43

Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 at 20:43
They are only following what the government has been doing for decades. Throwing money away because in the end its all to hard and of course there are the rest of us to pay for it whether through taxes or premiums. No big deal for either entity.
AnswerID: 606111

Reply By: Hoyks - Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 at 21:08

Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 at 21:08
More often than not it would cost more to recover the the item than it is worth. so they abandon it. There is no financial incentive to recover it, as they won't get the money back at an auction and there is no penalty for leaving it there.

A mate of mine crashed his bike near the WA/NT border near the Great Central Road. Armed only with a back pack he got a ride back to Perth with the RFDS (which was most inconvenient as he lives in Brisbane),his mates cannibalised what they could dragged the bike off the road, stashed it in the scrub with a tarp over it and took a GPS fix to pass onto the insurance company.

They paid out with no issue and stated that they wouldn't recover the bike as it would be too expensive, so they just cut their losses.

So out on the edge of the Great Victoria desert there is a XR400 with a nice Staintune exhaust, long range tank, luggage rack and custom suspension lying under a green tarp with a few logs thrown on top.
AnswerID: 606112

Follow Up By: Member - batsy - Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 at 21:22

Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 at 21:22
Hoyks the problem is in the first two sentences, "more to recover the item than it is worth", "no financial incentive to recover it", & "no penalty for leaving it there".
I guess that if there was a penalty for leaving it there our premiums would skyrocket or worse, nil insurance cover for those tracks/areas.Still another piece of "litter" in the environment.
On a side note pity about the XR400, nice bike.

Cheers
Batsy
Every day vertical above ground is a bonus.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 875836

Follow Up By: Genny - Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 at 22:58

Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 at 22:58
I'll play Devil's Advocate. Some wrecks left there long enough become part of the scenery. Beadell's truck, classic old 40's, 50's and 60's cars. I know, it's a minority.
3
FollowupID: 875838

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:48

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:48
They function as stark reminders of what can go horribly wrong in the Outback.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

6
FollowupID: 875845

Reply By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 06:07

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 06:07
While I understand the point about insurance companies leaving vehicles in the bush. The number of cars would be 1% of the problem caused by other parties such as people in local communities or other private car owners.

If you drive onto some areas, there are cars every 500m. Who is responsible for those? The government or the owner?



AnswerID: 606117

Follow Up By: mike39 - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 07:58

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 07:58
You only have to travel the road between Wiluna and Meekatharra (WA) to witness that!
And even though most of those wrecked/abandoned vehicles are not that old, am pretty certain all would be uninsured, many not even registered. .
mike
0
FollowupID: 875843

Reply By: Baz - The Landy - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 06:46

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 06:46
Not sure of the rules, if there are any governing this type of issue. But without doubt, I know who will pay if there are ever rules brought in, or current ones enforced.

Your hip pocket. The question goes to, is it the responsibility of the person who left it there, whheter they are required to do something or not?

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
AnswerID: 606119

Reply By: Robin Miller - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:01

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:01
A few wrecks out there isn't a real problem , sought of adds to the ambience provided its not overdone !

Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 606121

Follow Up By: The Explorer - Saturday, Nov 26, 2016 at 19:29

Saturday, Nov 26, 2016 at 19:29
To a certain extent - this rolled (yes rolled:) Nissan Patrol I drove past last week on the Trans Access Road is just plain rubbish :)



Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 875946

Reply By: Shaker - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:01

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:01
I would venture to say that many of the abandoned vehicles have been left by those that are "at one with the land"!

As far as the drums at the fuel dump, I believe they cart full drums in & empty ones out.
The ones littering along the sides of the track have been left by bogan travellers that seem to think that it's easier to carry a full drum than an empty one!

AnswerID: 606122

Follow Up By: Member - batsy - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:57

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:57
Maybe different now Shaker but when we went through in 2011 there were in excess of a hundred drums at the drop site. Hopefully this has changed ?

Cheers
Batsy
Every day vertical above ground is a bonus.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 875846

Reply By: gbc - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:02

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:02
Bog roll everywhere, tyres along the plenty highway - the list goes on. Humans are the blight. How many humans are going to pay extra on a premium to ensure their already paid out wreck is removed from a remote desert, compared to a policy which is maybe $300 odd cheaper a year?
AnswerID: 606123

Reply By: Echucan Bob - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:05

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:05
Almost every car owned by members of remote communities is driven til it drops, inverted, then incinerated. There are thousands of car wrecks throughout our remote regions. Many of you will have seen the bus on the Sandy Blight Junction Road, destined to rust away for hundreds of years on the WA side of the NT border.
Surely it is not beyond the wit or resources of our governments to arrange to collect these wrecks and recycle them.
AnswerID: 606124

Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 13:40

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 13:40
Why the government (read taxpayer), why not the person who left it there...?

Just thinking it out aloud.

Cheers, Baz
1
FollowupID: 875852

Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 14:18

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 14:18
Why not? Apparently we expect the government to do everything else for us!

0
FollowupID: 875853

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 14:38

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 14:38
.
Bob, from what I have been told by 'someone-who-lives-out-there' the indigenous ethos places little intrinsic value in material possessions, so when they cease to be of practical value, they are simply abandoned. Witness the cars, fridges etc. dumped around the houses in their communities.

Accordingly, vehicles will be abandoned where they fail.... on the road. Eventually someone, often the grader driver, will 'remove' them from the road and this can result in them being inverted. It is far more likely that a 'white' traveller will "incinerate" the abandoned vehicle than its indigenous owner who is no longer interested in it. 'Whitey' is very good at purposely vandalising the environment.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 875855

Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 15:09

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 15:09
I usually pick up as much garbage as I can while out there. Sadly I don't have the facility to collect effete cars. 99.9% of the wrecks are old Holdens or Falcons - not Prados burned out by spinifex fires. The cars' owners are likely untraceable or on a government handout anyway. Collecting the wrecks benefits us all- who better to do it than government. Governments seem quite happy to collect revenue at every opportunity, how about they do something useful for a change?
Bob
1
FollowupID: 875857

Follow Up By: terryt - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 16:43

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 16:43
Allan B I'd love to know where you got the information that whitey was more likely to torch a broken down car than it's indigenous previous owner or driver.
I recently watched an episode of bush mechanics and the "burn it so them other blokes can't get it" or words to that effect came up. This show was made by people from Yuendamoo and the cast was indigenous.
0
FollowupID: 875859

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 17:15

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 17:15
.
Terry, all that I am prepared to tell you is that it was a police officer who has spent a some years in remote postings. I have known him for a long time and believe what he tells me.

I have not seen your referenced Bush Mechanics episode but from a few observations of TV filmings I am very aware that the script and entire performance is controlled by the Director and they often lead the 'cast' to make expressions that are not extemporaneous. A 'good show' is not left to the ramblings of amateur performers.

Further, if a vehicle is broken beyond use, I doubt that the indigenous owners could care less about it.
I would more believe what my mate tells me than some TV show.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 875860

Follow Up By: terryt - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 17:55

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 17:55
Allan B
My query was not based on the TV show. I thought it added value as it was an old show and showed respect to traditional ways.
I also have a mate who spend significantly more than some years working on communities throughout Northern SA and the Territory. Some of the places he saw burnt out wrecks would be very unlikely to have had the "whitey" you so derogatively refer to anywhere near them.
You've heard of the black dog story. You say I've got a black dog only to get the reply I've got one too and it's blacker than yours.
I reckon my mate would be more informed than your mate.
I think they burn them so the rescue party knows to come. (I may have made that up)
We both probably fall into the trap of taking what we are told at face value.
No skin off my nose. I wondered if you had access to a study done for someones Phd.
Cheers
1
FollowupID: 875861

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 18:51

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 18:51
.
Terry, I'm just cynical about the media.

My police officer mate has had a lot of direct involvement with indigenous people, even living in a couple of the communities, so he is pretty well informed of their behaviour and of some touring "whiteys". Yes, the term is "derogative" as the particular section of the caucasian population that I refer to deserve the term.
Is the term "Whites" more acceptable to you?

Haha, so your mate's got a "blacker dog" eh? I don't think anyone needs to spend long in the Police Force to have seen pretty well all there is to see in our society.... Black or White.

Yes, I have several times heard the proposition of "burning for rescue attention" and have put it to my mate. He said "I don't think anyone at the Community would take any notice even if they did see it and neither would I." Maybe a bit like the suburban security alarm that everyone ignores!

No 'Doctoral Study', just my mate. I guess we all accept what we are told by someone we respect...... It's just that I don't respect the media but I have an awesome respect for my mate.

Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 875863

Follow Up By: GREG T11 - Thursday, Nov 24, 2016 at 22:13

Thursday, Nov 24, 2016 at 22:13
At last count the federals were putting in upwards of $900 million towards communities, I don't know about you Allan but seeing someone have an attitude that it has no intrinsic value is pretty much par for the course when it's free. Glad your happy to stump up every year for new Landcruiser or three so it can be trashed.

I leant pretty quick if you give the kids something for nothing it would be buggered in no time, make them pay and viola.

It is a problem that has been festering for years, no government has been able to address it and then you get clowns like Mundine stirring the pot.

The best part is when someone tries to put forward what may a solution that hasn't even reached a senate it gets shot down in flames by the likes of Perkins and any other lobby group with a self interest.

Cars on the side of the road is just the tip of the iceberg.
2
FollowupID: 875899

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 00:50

Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 00:50
.
Greg, $900 million?.......... Peanuts! Just today I got a "Project Upgrade" in my letterbox. The Government is about to spend $929.3 million on two traffic interchanges here on the Sunshine Coast.

But youv'e got it wrong. The "attitude that it has no intrinsic value" has little to do with it being "free". It is the indigenous ethos, encompassing thousands of years, that ascribes no value to material possessions. And we whites are unable to come to terms with that belief. We have no way of handling that. This is no criticism of either race. It is simply the fact of the matter.

By the way, "viola" is a musical instrument. 'Voila' is perhaps the word you seek? lol
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 875902

Follow Up By: tim_c - Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 12:44

Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 12:44
You beat me to it Greg: it's often been recognised (especially by those with children) that if you didn't have to work hard for something, you will never appreciate or value the true worth of having it.
0
FollowupID: 875913

Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 13:07

Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 13:07
Tim / Greg / Allan

I can see some parallels on both sides of the fence, dare I call it a divide. 40,000 of indigenous occupation and the environment thrived – Europeans get it for “nicks” and wreck our major waterways, and the land in many instances, in little more than 200 years…

I guess it comes down to what has more “instrinsic value” to you – the land on which you walk, or the “chattels” you place on it…

Agree or disagree as you see fit. I’m not up for a debate on it, just observing and offering a point of view!

Cheers, Baz – The Landy
1
FollowupID: 875916

Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 13:47

Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 13:47
There is a difference, they light a fire & it's wonderful,for the environment, we light a fire & we go to jail!

1
FollowupID: 875917

Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 16:00

Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 16:00
Shaker

Our Nationals Parks and State Forestry authorities, amongst others, including farmers, regularly conduct controlled burn-offs. As a kid growing up in North Queensland I used to enjoy watching the cane-fields burn-off before the cutting began – quite spectacular really…!

Like those referred to above, Indigenous Australians’ have a good understanding and appreciation that fire is part of the management and rejuvenation process of the Australian landscape…

I think you’ll be hard pressed to find any of these people being thrown in the “clink” for lighting a fire.

But hey, if by “we” you mean some person tossing a match into the undergrowth on a hot summers day just to get their jollies, then lock ‘em up and throw away the key.

I’m sure we’ll be in agreement!

Good weekend, Baz
0
FollowupID: 875922

Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 18:04

Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 18:04
It was a tongue in cheek comment!
Although, I look at land around communities in the Outback & struggle to believe that anyone cares, also if you talk to Station owners as I did in Arnhem Land, they light fires to get "their jollies" as well. In fact as a result of one such fire the Station staff had to light a fire to back burn to save property, plant & equipment, believe it or not the police wanted to charge them for lighting fire to save their property, even though the Police were provided with the registration number of the vehicle that sped off from the scene of the first fire, nothing was done!

2
FollowupID: 875928

Follow Up By: Member - batsy - Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 20:34

Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 20:34
Does one find it interesting how a perfectly clear simple topic can end up being quite removed from the topic/s now being discussed ?
Don't shoot me , it's just an observation.

Cheers & thanks for the dialogue.
Batsy
Every day vertical above ground is a bonus.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 875934

Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 21:17

Friday, Nov 25, 2016 at 21:17
batsy, that is a pretty good observation of the degeneration of a topic, from vehicles and trailers abandoned in the outback to where it always goes.

Had a work acquaintance that removed vehicles from remote main stream areas and he was making a good quid with his road train, I don't know who supplied the crusher though.

For those who are so quick to condemn, have a look around your streets at all the abandoned vehicles that the councils have to pick up. In my area there must be a huge influx of indigenous people by the number of cars that are abandoned.

Those same very (WHITE) people can't even get them to the recycling yards a few K's away.
1
FollowupID: 875936

Reply By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:22

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:22
So in reality, if a towed vehicle broke something and it couldn't be recovered economically, a hard floor camper for example, it could easily go over the value insured and be written off and just assumed abandoned.
An owner could use their own resources and practical skills to repair it to drive out, and properly repair back in civilization.
Of course if the insurer found out it'd be a different story they tell.
AnswerID: 606126

Follow Up By: Member - batsy - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 09:02

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 09:02
Les, if the said vehicle/camper was left abandoned with no defining ownership details & you chose to go to the effort of recovering then rebuilding it what real story would the insurance company have to tell ??

Cheers
Batsy
Every day vertical above ground is a bonus.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 875847

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 09:12

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 09:12
Well, you'd have to do it quickly, or it'd be stripped by others, and you'd have to really press them for an almost immediate decision.
Otherwise if you recovered it too soon before they more or less said sorry can't recover (and would they even do that ?) they would be able to say "was nice of you to recover your camper" go ahead and get quotes to fix it thank you".
Unless covered for recovery at an agreed rate (Club4x4 recovery ins for example) you'd be taking a financial risk doing it yourself.
Some might not mind this, others light strip what they could take out and see what transpires, if possible tow over a couple of dunes or into scrub and waypoint to come back.
0
FollowupID: 875848

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 09:22

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 09:22
I love seeing old vehicles in the outback.
AnswerID: 606129

Follow Up By: Member - batsy - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 09:35

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 09:35
Even better when people of the same vintage are seen operating them.....no offense intended Phil ??

Cheers
Batsy
Every day vertical above ground is a bonus.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

3
FollowupID: 875849

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 09:56

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 09:56
Haha - no offense at all.
Its a real pity when they get burnt. Can't use them for spare parts. Often there's a leaf spring or something that gets someone out of trouble.

Some do act as timely reminders - burnt out 4wds on the Canning or Hunt Oil Rd, or older 4wds with nothing more than a burnt out clutch, or the odd Jayco campertrailer. But burnt out commodores and falcons are an eyesore.
0
FollowupID: 875850

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 14:19

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 14:19
Yes, I have heard about this 'crush & collect' activity too.
But I believe its operation depends on the current price paid for scrap steel.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 875854

Follow Up By: Genny - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 20:26

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 20:26
Pretty bold climbing into a derelict car like that. Would absolutely guarantee it's providing cover for at least one deadly snake. Saw a photo once of shifting donga's on a WA mine site - 7 snakes under the first one they shifted.
0
FollowupID: 875866

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 21:49

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 21:49
Fortunately snakes sleep in winter. In any case, when was the last time a snake killed anyone?
0
FollowupID: 875868

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 22:19

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 22:19
.
Phil, I think it was in April of this year when a bloke was killed by a Coastal Taipan in Rockhampton.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 875869

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 23:01

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 23:01
Gday Allan, Yes a rare event these days - he was a snake handler trying to catch a deadly snake - hopefully not something we tourists try to do!
In Australia, we average 2 deaths a year from snakebites - mostly from people trying to catch or kill snakes. I reckon mozzies kill more people!
2
FollowupID: 875871

Reply By: Malcom M - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 10:00

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 10:00
There's a couple of guys running road trains (one out of Alice, other further up north) who have a mobile crusher on one deck. They crush & remove any wrecks they come across, stack them up and take it all back for recycling. $20-30,000 revenue each time. $10K for a 100 series engine makes this quite profitable.
So not all wrecks are left to the elements.

Here's the Alice guy, can't remember who teh other one was.
http://www.asmr.com.au/alice-springs-metal-recyclers
AnswerID: 606132

Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 11:16

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 11:16
The bloke from Alice travels far and wide [ was even on TV a couple of years ago on the show 'Outback Truckers' ] and ventures into QLD every couple of years or so to small-ish places to the car dumps , he did a full load cleanup at Muttaburra round 2 years ago , crushed all thing metal at the dump [ old fridges ,washing machines etc.] built up over 10/ 15 years and 40/50 old cars dumped at the 'car dump' built up over 20 or so years,, made the place look nice , but nowhere then to get that '1 bolt am short of ' …..
0
FollowupID: 875851

Follow Up By: Sigmund - Sunday, Nov 27, 2016 at 08:37

Sunday, Nov 27, 2016 at 08:37
Travelling through Port Hedland this winter we saw a huge steel recovery dump, including a pile of wrecked vehicles.

Maybe they get 20c deposit back when returned to Japan!
0
FollowupID: 875951

Reply By: Member - Kevin S12 - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 13:37

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 13:37
Hi Batsy, its the cost of recovery that makes the vehicle a write off. The Insurer wont pay out more than you are Insured for and I'm sure people would not like to have the cost of recovery deducted from their payout.
The answer would be for those people travelling in remote areas to get extra cover for recovery costs. I don't even know if it is possible to buy that cover but some of the specialist 4x4 companies may be interested....if not... great opportunity for someone. Cheers
AnswerID: 606137

Follow Up By: Jackolux - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 15:06

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 15:06
I have my Dmax and Tvan insured with Club 4x4 , the std Policy has $1500 worth of remote recovery for crash or breakdown , $1500 wouldn't go far in the Simpson Canning or many other remote places .

I did take out a extra $15000 worth of cover for crash or breakdown , I'm covered anywhere in Australia I'm legally allowed to be .

I don't know what they would do if the Vehicle was a total loss , somewhere remote , they might just payout and not recover it ,

I hope I never have to find out .
0
FollowupID: 875856

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 15:15

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 15:15
From recollection of various threads on forums, Club 4x4 Ins have a small amount of recovery ins in their basic policy, think it fairly low though, maybe $1500 ?
An option on their policy is for $15000 recovery cover, can't recall what the premium is, imagine quite a bit.
Edit, Jackolux beat me to it.
0
FollowupID: 875858

Follow Up By: Member - Kevin S12 - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 18:51

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 18:51
I thought some one would do it. I'll have a look at them next time. Also I guess it gives you the option then of recovering and fixing.
0
FollowupID: 875862

Follow Up By: Jackolux - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 21:09

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 21:09
Club 4x4 offer $15000 and $30000 remote cover , I took out the $15000 cover it was a extra $140 at the time but things have changed since I took out the policy it is now a bit higher cost
0
FollowupID: 875867

Reply By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 19:30

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 19:30
Interesting topic. On a recent trip this year on the Madigan Line, we encountered a couple of vehicles in Mt Dare that were UTS. One fairly new BT50 had a broken back (overloading) that you could see from 30 yards away. Like a banana right where the tray meets the cabin. Still had a lot of gear in it and I assume the owner would come back at some stage to retrieve his kit.
Assuming it was insured, and given the cost of recovery and repair, it was an probably a write off. You would have had to pull the whole body off to fix it given that the chassis would need to be replaced.

My companions and myself wondered if it was ever going to be recovered and if not, at what point does the wreck become the responsibiliy or property of the owners of the facility - do they strip it or just tow it off into the bush or who pays to send it back on a flatbed...
AnswerID: 606145

Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 22:32

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 22:32
Just my morbid curiosity but I wonder in a case like that, or many others showing abandoned vehicles that very well may be insurance right offs, who is the legal owner of the wreck. As I'm sure most know, the wreck, when recoverable, in an economic sense, becomes the property of the insurance company on pay out of the claim. What ever is left usually gets sold off to a wrecking yard, or whoever is interested, to help the insurer offset some of the cost.
So even though the wreck is in a remote location, wouldn't whatever is left become the property of the insurance company so anyone recovering said wreck without the express permission of the insurer be stealing??
Or is there some statute of limitations whereby if not recovered within a certain time frame the ownership is considered to be relinquished???

Cheers
Pop
0
FollowupID: 875870

Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 23:53

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 23:53
Pop, agree it would belong to the insurance company. However I can't see any lilelyhood that they're going to retrieve it - just not worth it. Seen plenty of write off's behind remote garages in my time....
0
FollowupID: 875873

Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Thursday, Nov 24, 2016 at 09:57

Thursday, Nov 24, 2016 at 09:57
Scott, as you say there are plenty of what seem to be rite offs left, dumped all over the outback.
What I am getting at is if say for example you came across a 40 series that had been rolled and left there. Let's assume an insurance rite off. If you came along and saw that while there was a lot of body damage but all the mechanicals were still there. You thought that you could use them for spares and decided to recover the wreck for yourself.
Unless you could find out who was the owner, and could get written permission, would you be breaking the law by hauling it home for your own use??
In practical terms I know most wrecks get ratted for any useful parts over the years and AFAIK no one seems to get too concerned.
Dunno about you mate, but I know that when I owned any of the 4 40 series I owned I would have been very tempted...LOL.

Cheers
Pop
0
FollowupID: 875876

Reply By: Member - Robyn R4 - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 21:44

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 21:44
My bestie's car caught fire on the Savannah Way in September, about 180km east of Borroloola.
Not sure of the finer details yet but they grabbed what they could out of the car, unhitched their almost-new-saved-their-butts-off camper trailer and then watched in horror as the flames leapt the car and cooked some of the stuff they'd just rescued and thrown to the side of the road...!
Fortunately a couple came along with an empty tow-bar and two spare seats in the car and took them to Borollola. They hired a ute in town and continued their trip, buying a replacement vehicle in Darwin.
Rescuing the vehicle is beyond thought, even though the insurance assessors were wanting to see it at one point...until they were told how far out of town it was located!
It's a pity that more guys like the one in Outback Truckers don't do the roads but Australia's a damn big country...
And no, the outback wrecks don't always belong to a certain group. Sometimes they belong to a beautiful couple who've saved their butts off and have had a pretty crappy trip!

:)
AnswerID: 606147

Follow Up By: Member - batsy - Thursday, Nov 24, 2016 at 08:55

Thursday, Nov 24, 2016 at 08:55
It seems that they were lucky to survive physically unscathed, mental trauma could be another thing. Luck also came their way with the rescue by the sound of it too. Sad about the loss but as has been said before material things can be replaced, life & limb are a little harder.

Cheers
Batsy
Every day vertical above ground is a bonus.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 875875

Reply By: Member - Robyn R4 - Thursday, Nov 24, 2016 at 19:03

Thursday, Nov 24, 2016 at 19:03
Oh yeh.
I still marvel at the fact that someone not only had an empty tow ball (doesn't everyone with a tow ball have something attached to it in remote areas?!) and also 2 spare seats for them (again, doesn't everyone in remote areas have the car fairly well packed?!)
Amongst other things, she lost her bag with her wallet and all ID, her beautiful camera (she has a small photography business) and he has a pair of jeans with a beautifully burned out crotch that he wants to frame as a souvenir (like they do with signed footy jumpers!!). They're still arguing that one..!
We've promised to pay our respects to the late car when we next do the Savannah Way.
Just like I have always wondered about abandoned homes in remote places (did they hit bad times and abandon, or is there a beautiful new home over a hill?), I also now wonder at abandoned cars a little more than I used to.
:)
AnswerID: 606174

Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Thursday, Nov 24, 2016 at 19:17

Thursday, Nov 24, 2016 at 19:17
This has nothing to do with the OP's opening post.

Maybe you're responding to a followup or another reply somewhere, but right here it makes no sense at all.
FrankP

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 875889

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Nov 24, 2016 at 19:31

Thursday, Nov 24, 2016 at 19:31
Pay attention Frank. It belongs as a Followup to the post from Batsy immediately above.
You have to allow for spelling and posting errors here. LOL
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 875890

Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Thursday, Nov 24, 2016 at 20:18

Thursday, Nov 24, 2016 at 20:18
I'm trying, Allan, I'm trying. :-)

Cheers
FrankP

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

1
FollowupID: 875894

Reply By: Sigmund - Sunday, Nov 27, 2016 at 08:42

Sunday, Nov 27, 2016 at 08:42
I'd say a number of burned wrecks were done by bush fire, not directly by humans. An eg would be Willem's old wagon on the CSR - he went back for it and was not a little disappointed.

After a few years the only sign of the fire is the blackened wreck.

Acc to a press item today, a NASA satellite detected nearly 5000 bush fires on our continent in 2013.
AnswerID: 606240

Reply By: Life Member-Doug T NSW - Sunday, Jan 22, 2017 at 09:27

Sunday, Jan 22, 2017 at 09:27
I have travelled the GCH twice and the amount of cars left out there is staggering, and they not left by tourists.
gift by Daughter

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 607866

Follow Up By: Member - batsy - Sunday, Jan 22, 2017 at 09:47

Sunday, Jan 22, 2017 at 09:47
I would venture to say that more than one is tourist related but I get your point.
Hope all is well with you again.
Cheers
Batsy
Every day vertical above ground is a bonus.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 877605

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)